Author Topic: Touring Bikes?  (Read 2497 times)

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #100 on: Yesterday at 10:03:10 am »
Och, just when ye think ye have the bike all sorted, up pops this wee beastie... Very braw indeed!

Tbh if you're thinking of heavily loaded touring potentially on dirt roads, I'd go discs.  Your rims are bound to take a beating and a buckled rim won't kill your braking on a disc bike.[/list]

I've never had a bike with disc brakes, so this may be a dumb question: how easy is it to pack up a bike in a soft bag for flying so that the discs don't get bent in transit?
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #101 on: Yesterday at 10:24:58 am »
If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.

Why would parts be easier to get if you're using down tube or bar end shifters? And what relevance is that to broken cassettes* or mechs?

*Has anyone ever actually "broken" a cassette?!

I helped out a guy a few years ago on the Kidderminster Killer who had broken his cassette.  He didn't understand why his gears were playing up until I pointed out that a significant chunk of one of the larger cogs on his expensive-looking cassette was making a bid for freedom.  I fully removed the broken chunk and told him not to use what was left of that gear and to be really careful when he changed across the gap that was left.

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #102 on: Yesterday at 04:08:54 pm »
Quote from: Pickled Onion
[/quote

I've never had a bike with disc brakes, so this may be a dumb question: how easy is it to pack up a bike in a soft bag for flying so that the discs don't get bent in transit?

I'd you are running hydraulics then more of an issue is someone or something applying the brake levers and the pads coming out too far so having either a lock for the lever or something to stick in between the pads is worth doing.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #103 on: Yesterday at 04:13:39 pm »
I'd you are running hydraulics then more of an issue is someone or something applying the brake levers and the pads coming out too far so having either a lock for the lever or something to stick in between the pads is worth doing.

That's why you need to remember to put the little yellow plastic blocks into the caliper between the pads so that this doesn't happen.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #104 on: Yesterday at 05:26:10 pm »
I've never had a bike with disc brakes, so this may be a dumb question: how easy is it to pack up a bike in a soft bag for flying so that the discs don't get bent in transit?
Plenty of bike bagging vids on Youtube, some different options, but the obvious thing is to pack the wheels with the rotors facing into the bag. 
If that's not possible, or you're still not convinced they're well enough protected, it's a quick job to remove them and transport them somewhere else.  I've done this a couple of times when taking an Airnimal on coach holidays without a decent bag, rotors came off and packed in a pannier.   

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #105 on: Yesterday at 06:09:25 pm »
And ultimately, truing a disc rotor isn't particularly difficult given somewhere quiet and an adjustable spanner.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #106 on: Yesterday at 10:01:12 pm »
And ultimately, truing a disc rotor isn't particularly difficult given somewhere quiet and an adjustable spanner.

Or a bottle opener...

https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/collections/tools/products/bottle-opener-with-rotor-truing-tool

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #107 on: Yesterday at 10:50:57 pm »
If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.

Why would parts be easier to get if you're using down tube or bar end shifters? And what relevance is that to broken cassettes* or mechs?

*Has anyone ever actually "broken" a cassette?!

I have to agree.

I went round the world with bar-ends rather than STIs but it wasn't for reliability, it was so I could run 8 speed gears.  The supply of decent 8 speed stuff is drying up though, so it probably didn't buy me much of an advantage.  If I did it again I'd probably run 10 speed and STIs, and know I could get high quality spares anywhere across Asia.  Loads of intercontinental tourists do this and they don't seem to come to any harm.

The other thing to note about STIs breaking (which they won't, because they don't) is that non-functioning gears are a lot less of a problem than non-functioning brakes, so you don't need to worry about them quite so much.  One could kill you, the other will just mean you have to push up a few hills until you get to the next bike shop.

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #108 on: Today at 08:31:57 am »
When I built Fred I went for friction shifting from the outset as I didn't want the hassle of tuning index shifting to cope with a huge gear range.  On the road I find friction shifting just as easy to use as index shifting which I have on another bike (Dakota).

On Fred I swapped to downtube friction shifters when Fred was going to spend a lot of time being transported on car roof racks.  DT shifters were fine but I've swapped back to bar ends as its nice to be able shift without taking your hands off the bars.