Author Topic: Winter bike.  (Read 2346 times)

Winter bike.
« on: December 13, 2020, 09:58:37 am »
Before Covid, I ride with a great bunch, evenings mostly occasionally Saturday. Some were stoic hardrider, similar to audaxers. Some rode carbon fibre , mudless bikes whatever the conditions. Didn't bother me, I'd get on the front as my bike has mudguards and long flaps fitted. If I was slower and dropped back I'd leave 30 ft. so I didn't get sprayed. What do others ride during winter or wet conditions?

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2020, 10:12:37 am »
I mostly enjoy riding with people who care enough about others to use long mudguards and mud-flaps in wet weather. Less considerate folk can ride alongside or behind only. Forcing me to suddenly drop way back from the group because of your selfishness is ... well, you can guess.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2020, 10:21:13 am »
Before Covid, I ride with a great bunch, evenings mostly occasionally Saturday. Some were stoic hardrider, similar to audaxers. Some rode carbon fibre , mudless bikes whatever the conditions. Didn't bother me, I'd get on the front as my bike has mudguards and long flaps fitted. If I was slower and dropped back I'd leave 30 ft. so I didn't get sprayed. What do others ride during winter or wet conditions?

My bike. If it's icy, I'll fit studded tyres.

I don't use mudguards as I have not found any that fit my bike and aren't shit. But the tailfin stops the majority of spray.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2020, 11:14:08 am »
Any carbon bike can be fitted with mudguards. People who turn up to group rides without them on wet/muddy days are simply... whatever word you want to choose.

Although a lot of the clip-on variety are so short they mostly serve to focus skog on the rider behind's face, so a simple "you must have mudguards" rule can be totally counterproductive.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2020, 11:38:31 am »
I prefer to think of "dry" and "wet" bikes, as there are still dry days in winter although damp roads take longer to dry out.

The only difference is the dry bikes don't have mudguards, the wet bike does. And none of them are hack bikes, life's too short for that.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2020, 12:15:52 pm »
I suppose I've misjudged or inferred that people have a crappy bike for winter.I agree with two separate points, I have a wet bike and a dry bike. The wet bike has big (40 mm Clement Explorer) ideal for current wet, gravel and mud strewn roads, and it's actually a really nice bike as life is too short for a rubbish bike , excellent gears, hydraulic brakes great handling etc. Lightweight it is not but that's not important to me in winter. I can't say I'm impressed when mates turn up without mudguards in wet weather, but then again, life's too short to complain. I just get my own house in order.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2020, 12:18:38 pm »
Topical issue, my day to day steed is a Croix de fer 10 which up to today was fitted with 28c tyres and race blade pro XL. Given up on the latter, just not enough coverage to stop the frame and my feet getting sprayed so I just ordered Longboards and 32c Marathon tyres.

I’m rapidly forming the opinion that life is too short to suffer in silence

A

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2020, 12:29:25 pm »
I've been mostly riding my Streetmachine, because it's my favourite bike, is reliable, low-maintenance, and high enough not to get me splashed with skog or dazzled by headlights.

If it turns icy, I'll use the trike (which is a faff) or whichever upright has studded tyres, depending on what sort of ride I'm doing and how much I feel like cleaning the bike afterwards.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2020, 10:33:50 pm »
I was out today . On my favourite , most used bike . Titanium frame , full mudguards & flaps ,28mm tyres , 8 speed  triple with friction levers on kelly take offs and biggish saddle bag . It's the modern version of a clubman allrounder bike  . Reliable but also cheap and easy to fix by the road side . Stopped twice today to help out other cyclist . First one had punctured his  23mm thin, tyres and had no tubes & mine wouldn't fit .  So I gave him a hand to fix it with my puncture repair kit . Second one , the rear mech was playing up , so I ended up pouring water from a puddle  on to the mech to clear  all the muck off it . I would say apart from a few club men with mudguards , 80% of the riders looked like they had been cycling on the pit heap . Absulutley caked in mud. A friend of mine thinks a lot of born again road cyclist  are from a mountain bike background  and think its quite normal to have a wet arse . I bet a lot of component manufactures are laughing all the way to the bank . After I dropped my bike ( it doesn't go around muddy corners like my trike) , I notice a broken spoke , who says 36 spokes in a back wheel is overkill . Saved me  buggering about I just rode it home . Will winter bike be killed off with trendy folks with disposable income . A local sportive club to me ride all year around in tight Groups with not a mudguard in sight . All wear glasses and face covering .
Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the soul  three wheels Nurses !!!

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2020, 10:47:06 pm »
Ps  when the gritters out the trike is out . In fact I use It most of the time . But its not friendly to other cyclists with only a front mudguard but the drive train lasts longer than similar 7/8 speed triple bikes .       
Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the soul  three wheels Nurses !!!

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2020, 10:54:24 am »
The mudguard bike is down at present after a bottom bracket/chainset incident. So I quickly built up the Aithein frame I intended to sell with some spare bits and am riding that at present. Very wet yesterday, but I’m not sure it’s worse for the drivetrain than guards would be - and I’m not riding with other people at the moment.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2020, 10:54:36 am »
Same bikes all year round. My recumbent, road or folder.  All of them have mudguards with flaps fitted.  The only difference in winter is that I fit more robust tyres as I don’t want to stop for punctures in the cold.  Mostly I ride my recumbent as I wanted to make it my audax bike of choice.  So that required some dedicated riding to get the legs up to speed. When I first built the recumbent, the carbon fork had a hole in fork crown but no mudguard eyelets. So I rode it with a rear but no front mudguard. This resulted in a load of muddy spray in my face the first day it was wet.  Not long after I got some PDW adapters to fit a front mudguard.

Never quite understand why road bikers like a muddy stripe up their backs and a filthy frame.  I too used to mtn bike, and a post ride clean with a low pressure hose, plus stripping off in car parks if you’d driven to the ride, were the norm. But I’d rather not have that if I’ve been on the road.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2020, 05:56:54 pm »
I tend to revert to a fixed-wheel machine when conditions are poorer. Old habit.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2020, 06:00:23 pm »
Maybe it’s my mtn biking years but my derailleurs would get caked in mud year round and they never missed a bit.  These derailleurs are now on my recumbent and still fine more than a decade on. Winter certainly doesn’t destroy derailleurs

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2020, 06:02:11 pm »
Most MTBs don’t actually cover a lot of miles compared to road bikes.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2020, 07:48:46 pm »
winter/wet weather. Generally the touring/endurance bike  full mudguards and 48mm tires (650b) tubeless
Fair weather road racer. 26mm tires. tubes. Never mud guards.
Gravel bike. Hull mud guards dependant on weather. 32 mm. tubeless.
often lost.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2020, 08:26:59 pm »
Most MTBs don’t actually cover a lot of miles compared to road bikes.

Still a few thousand a year. It was about 4,000 miles a year on the mtn bike for me. More when I commuted on it. Not a lot compared to what you can rack up on a road bike but still.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2020, 09:45:45 pm »
Deliberately bought a wet weather/winter bike 14 months ago and have put almost 4,000 miles on it.
Chose a titanium framed gravel bike with a 1x11 gear setup.
Full mudguards with flaps and running 35 mm tyres.
Still very happy with my choice.
I don't want to grow old gracefully. I want to grow old disgracefully.

Chris N

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #18 on: December 17, 2020, 09:35:04 am »
All my bikes are winter bikes - lights, guards, flaps, the lot.  It rains all year round.  :thumbsup:

The Family Cyclist

  • Formerly known as Johnny Faro
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2020, 01:36:13 pm »
I generally ride my tourer as has guards, lights and suitable tyres for crap roads covered in crap

My fast bike comes out on the days the stars align when guards etc aren't required

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #20 on: December 22, 2020, 06:50:17 pm »
The mudguard bike is down at present after a bottom bracket/chainset incident. So I quickly built up the Aithein frame I intended to sell with some spare bits and am riding that at present. Very wet yesterday, but I’m not sure it’s worse for the drivetrain than guards would be - and I’m not riding with other people at the moment.

This morning I added a set of Topeak i-glow clip on guards to the Aithein. They're on special at Wiggle and much better than no guards. They're not very long and the rear doesn't run past the brake mount, but for what they are they're fine. They wouldn't clear anything bigger than 25's, but nor will the bike. It's quite nice when you turn them on in the dark and they light up:)

What I miss about the other bike is the big tyres and full guards. What I like about the Aithein is how it steers. I'm pretty ambivalent on the rim vs disc thing in most conditions, although discs are clearly better when it's really wet and skoggy.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #21 on: December 22, 2020, 08:48:40 pm »
I don't have a winter bike. Or perhaps more likely I don't have a summer bike. I have two bikes, one has a rack, the other has a saddlebag, both have mudguards.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2020, 09:03:39 pm »
^ this
Mudguards just make sense for my riding.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2020, 10:23:32 pm »
I ride a Dolan Preffisio (alloy framed) bike for the winter months.  Sadly not available anymore except from Ebay from time to time.  Before that, I had a Ribble (alloy) Blue which were very popular at one time but they too were dis-continued.

In early Spring, I usually switch to my Van Nicholas Yukon (titanium) and then to my Enigma Etape (Titanium) for the summer months.

All bikes are fitted with either SKS or Portland full length mudguards as I like to stop at cafes along my routes without being covered in mud or sh1t.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2020, 02:24:11 pm »
^ this
Mudguards just make sense for my riding.

+2.  I ride in the UK, so mudguards make sense all year round.

The exceptions are the Reasonably Priced Mountain Bicycle, which has half-arsed mudguards that serve only to keep the sheep shit / snow slush off the top half of the rider, and The Red Baron when it's actually racing.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...