Author Topic: bike fit for long distance  (Read 1675 times)

bike fit for long distance
« on: August 14, 2017, 04:36:55 pm »
A query for readers with reasonable experience of 600+ riding.  I'm thinking about getting a bike fit service to look at my position, having experienced some problems after the Pendle and the 24hr TT.  Like many riders, I have self-tweaked over the years to stop issues of ride-stopping proportions - but I think I've gone as far as I can down that route.

Is it necessary to seek out someone who understands 600km + riding to do this, or is it just a case of finding a reputable provider of bike fits?  I saw from the knowledge board that Hewitt's are recommended and that's only about 1hr from South Cumbria where I live.  Does anyone have any recommendations in the region - Manchester, Yorks Dales, Carlisle are about as far as is reasonable to travel.

Paul

Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2017, 05:26:51 pm »
I would go to Hewitts there are lots of places with fancy tackle charging a lot more , but Paul has a lot of knowledge and he won't try to sell you something that won't fit .
I once went in to buy a Cervelo Frameset only to be told he would love to sell me one but I would not fit it as I was not flexible enough, now ask yourself how many shops would do that 🤔.
He builds all our wheels too , never had any issues and I travel a hour these days each way to get his shop.

Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2017, 05:31:11 pm »
What issues are you having? Are they the type that can be fixed by a bike fit? You may find it's the bike that has to change rather than yourself.  I had a bike fit some time ago that showed me I needed a new frame as I couldn't get my saddle back far enough.

Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2017, 05:38:40 pm »
I have used Cyclefit in London on two sperate occaisions. They now have a studio in Manchester http://cyclefit.co.uk/stores/manchester

The first fit back in 2007 made some pretty big changes to my setup, but made a huge difference to my overall comfort on longer rides.
The second fit in 2015 only made some very minor adjustments to my previous fit, which was comensurate with another eight years of ageing!

Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2017, 06:47:30 pm »
What issues are you having? Are they the type that can be fixed by a bike fit? You may find it's the bike that has to change rather than yourself.  I had a bike fit some time ago that showed me I needed a new frame as I couldn't get my saddle back far enough.
I don't really get much in the way of problems on 200s or long flat rides, but on long hilly rides I get some anterior knee pain and post ride loss of feeling in the fingers.  I'm also interested to see if my position could be made more efficient as I am often near the back of the field and would prefer to be able to build up a bit more sleep time on the very challenging events.

Also thank you to the others who have posted, it's appreciated.

Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2017, 08:31:05 pm »
Before you decide it's perhaps worth having a read of the various articles linked from: https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/faq/
Unfortunately their UK guy (The Bike Whisperer) is a long way from where you are.

frankly frankie

  • I kid you not
    • Fuchsiaphile
Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2017, 11:16:42 pm »
The last time I had a frame custom-built  (and we're talking a very long time ago here, because I have long since learnt that for someone my 'normal' shape and build custom is completely pointless and actually counter-productive) - since I was aware my builder was mainly into the racing and TT-ing scene, I simply told him I want a bike to do an End-to-End on.  (That is, a proper non-stop End-to-End, not one of these new-fangled 2-week jobbies). 
It served me very well for 2 PBPs and 6 or so randonneur years, until I splashed the cash on a carbon frame that was simply in a different league.
you only live but once, and when you're dead you're done, so let the good times roll

Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2017, 07:11:59 am »

Quote
[size=0px]but on long hilly rides I get some anterior knee pain and post ride loss of feeling in the fingers[/size]

One way of interpreting this  is..


Anterior knee pain suggests over extension of the leg. The fact that it only happens after 200km suggests that the saddle is only just too high. Numb/tingling fingers implies there is too much weight on your hands which suggests that your saddle is too far forwards.


So in the first instance you could investigate moving your saddle back to remove pressure on your hands and then reduce saddle height so that the distance between the crank axle and the centre of the saddle is less than before you started moving the saddle. MOving the saddle back effectively increases the distance between the saddle and pedals hence the need to also lower it.


You may be surprised at how much you need to move the saddle back to remove the pressure on your hands.  Like me you may find that a frame with a 73/4 degree seat tube doesn't allow the saddle to go back enough even with a long layback seat post.




Other info to muse upon is this


http://wheel-easy.org.uk/uploads/documents/Bike%20Set%20Up%202017a.pdf

Re: bike fit for long distance
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2017, 06:14:40 pm »
A bit further south than you wanted but Adrian Timmis just south of Stoke is another option. TDF rider who still rides and fits a lot of racers. However he understands ahead as well.

Lots of good advice on how to ride your bike which does not come naturally to most of us!