Author Topic: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike  (Read 1179 times)

Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« on: November 06, 2020, 09:05:47 am »
Has anyone seen one? In real life?

Saw pictures of the bike onscreen and was rather taken by it. It appears ridiculously cheap. Its non folding but thats what appeals to me. Yes,I guess the components  and so on might not be branded,and the weight might be somewhat OTT(perhaps),but this might be one robust machine. Altho I've never seen,experienced nor have read of any mid frame failure in a folder,the all-in-one frame appeals to my thoughts of security in travel. I dont travel fast(I cant and dont want to),but this machine looks as if it could handle a few years of robust travel within any country in Europe with few problems. With better engineered steeds at much higher prices one is more considered in them being stolen or in having them damaged. With this machine I dont think I'd have these worries.

Others thoughts?

Has anyone ever seen one? Lumps of iron,or wot?

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2020, 10:15:16 am »
Challenge is Argos* own brand. It likely has the typical BSO problems - unbranded components made of cheese that are impossible to adjust correctly and last just long enough for it to go in the shed rather than be taken back to the shop; bearings that don't stay round for very long; etc. The listed weight is 13.5 kg, which is approximately one ton. The geometry doesn't look great (short wheelbase) and the chainring looks tiny for a small-wheeled bike if you have any intention of making progress.

The frame is likely solid and if you're prepared to replace a lot of the components (pedals, brakes, bottom bracket, hubs, chainset, saddle, tyres, grips, ...) it might be ok.

(* the book of dreams one, not the other one)

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2020, 11:41:55 am »
Can see your point of view Grams. Compris. Howsoever,my own view is that if someone 100 plus years ago went around the world on a bike that had bad engineering,components and grubby roads to cycle on...then,surely,any bike even from Argos on today's roads must be better. I guess it all boils down to what you want to do,how much you can afford,how comfortable and reliable you want your ride to be. Alas,I could buy a pretty expensive bike but be passed any day by any half decent club cyclist...it colours my view: no use going out all togged out to be passed or bettered by someone on gaswork job. Too humiliating  ;)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2020, 12:07:25 pm »
I'd trust a low-end bike from Decathlon a lot more than one from Argos.  They tend to make the necessary compromises in more sensible places, so you end up with a heavy bike with uninspiring components that actually work.

For example: https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/tilt-120-folding-bike/_/R-p-120068
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2020, 01:36:46 pm »
^
This.
Whoever specs the bikes at Decathlon, has a good idea of what they are doing.

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2020, 01:53:16 pm »
Can see your point of view Grams.

I've owned a Challenge 20-inch folding bike since new and I've simply listed the parts that have required replacement. Not through wear-and-tear or to upgrade but through being straight up not-fit-for-purpose from the factory.

Quote
Howsoever,my own view is that if someone 100 plus years ago went around the world on a bike that had bad engineering,components and grubby roads to cycle on...then,surely,any bike even from Argos on today's roads must be better.

One of the wonders of capitalism is that it's as effective as encouraging innovation in the "how poorly can I make this thing and get away with it?" category as it is in improving anything.

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2020, 08:53:26 am »
Well,that's buried the idea of the Challenge bicycle(tho I had no intention of buying one!) I still like the idea of the no fold frame tho.

I like the look of the Decathlon jobbie: especially in red. Sweet.

Have 'they' given up on stealing small wheeled bikes yet? I rarely see any secured in the open. Can you really take them shopping as in  'easy'. I cant and wont take my own(tho not as origami fold as Brompton) Had two stolen. Now ride and park open framed cycle into town: now no anxiolytics need to be taken.

Hilldodger

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2020, 04:50:42 pm »
Howsoever,my own view is that if someone 100 plus years ago went around the world on a bike that had bad engineering

I wouldn't say that bikes from over 100 years ago had poor engineering - far from it in my view.

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2020, 03:04:21 pm »
Howsoever,my own view is that if someone 100 plus years ago went around the world on a bike that had bad engineering

I wouldn't say that bikes from over 100 years ago had poor engineering - far from it in my view.

Exactly!

Thus 100 years on I should be able to tour about the world on an equal or better bike than what was 100 years back...and especially so as(I guess)roads have improved and with them shops.mechanics,spares etc.

One of us is getting mixed up in what I meant.

Probably me.

And to get RTW as good as anything offered in 1910 with the state of metalled roads then.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2020, 08:41:53 pm »
There's more to engineering than making better Things, because most Thing-engineers work for businesses who make their money from selling Things, and a lot has been learned about production costs and marketing in those hundred years.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Challenge Urban 20inch wheeled bike
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2020, 10:49:36 pm »
I'd trust a low-end bike from Decathlon a lot more than one from Argos.  They tend to make the necessary compromises in more sensible places, so you end up with a heavy bike with uninspiring components that actually work.

For example: https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/tilt-120-folding-bike/_/R-p-120068

Can you actually buy a tilt in UK? They are in category "unobtanium" in France (as are a lot of  D4's other offerings; they've even gone into the secondhand market in order to have something to sell!) This is one of the reasons why I bought my Montana (although I think it might be a slightly better bike than the tilt)