Author Topic: Electronic thermometers  (Read 1768 times)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Electronic thermometers
« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2021, 12:34:36 am »
I've always considered the glass to be a greater hazard than the mercury...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Electronic thermometers
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2021, 03:03:42 pm »
I've always considered the glass to be a greater hazard than the mercury...

I think that's true for a clinical thermometer, which only uses a drop of mercury.

Old Skule sphygmomanometers contain quite a lot of mercury thobut.

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Re: Electronic thermometers
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2021, 06:33:26 pm »
I love a cat's facial expression when the vet does that.  They don't even warm it first.

Vets do it because it's the only way to put one over on a cat.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Electronic thermometers
« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2021, 06:57:49 pm »
I've always considered the glass to be a greater hazard than the mercury...

I think that's true for a clinical thermometer, which only uses a drop of mercury.

Old Skule sphygmomanometers contain quite a lot of mercury thobut.

Still metallic mercury, which is mostly harmless.  It's when it's vaporising or forming salts with things that you've got trouble.  A subtlety that seems lost on health & safety regulations, which for good reason aren't really a place for subtlety.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Electronic thermometers
« Reply #29 on: January 21, 2021, 12:58:07 am »
Indeed but a drop of metallic mercury won't generate much vapour in your average home.

There is probably some mercury lurking in my molars anyway.