Author Topic: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?  (Read 619 times)

Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« on: March 18, 2021, 12:40:37 pm »
I bought a bent at a reasonable price,  when I decide it deserves another user what is fair with the price? I bought it from a guy on a forum at a reasonable price. Being an old model I think it's possibly depreciated as much as it will ever  is it acceptable to put the same price up? I've never sold on anything like a bike so I have no idea of pricing.

If things have gone up in price do you increase and profit. If they go down do you take a loss? Basically market prices or what you feel is honest considering you bought it secondhand too.

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2021, 04:07:49 pm »
I think you would need to be specific to get a view. It could be £500 up to £2 - 3K. If it's old model then it's likely to be at the lower end. Some 'unknown' bents go for peanuts.

I have personally purchased something for £400 a couple of years ago and it's going for double that these days. I have also considered purchasing one knowing it's way over priced but it may be another year before another comes up. Sometimes people post bents on ebay /facebook for crazy prices and they sit there for months. 

It depends on the brand, model, components, condition, how rare, where you live, the season etc. If you advise on the model and brand I'm sure people can offer an opinion.

Or if you want to PM me I can add my two pennies worth........

LMT

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2021, 02:32:40 pm »
What you think it is worth is fair value, what it is worth on the market is market value. Fair value will always be more than market value as you have a bias towards getting a higher price as it means more money to yourself.

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2021, 03:28:34 pm »
Not if I bought at a low pricing ebb in the market. AFAIK all bike prices both new and secondhand have gone up during this pandemic. So my fair value is what I paid for it but market value could be a few hundred more. That I don't know but I am guessing that pandemic prices have increased with a lot of exercise, fitness and sports equipment.

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2021, 06:48:17 pm »
I wouldn't assume used 'bent bike prices have gone up. We are in a recession, lots of people furloughed. I wouldn't be happy to sell a bike at a lot below market value only to have the buyer sell it on at a profit.

The problem with selling a bent bike is finding the buye, particularly if you are not wantilng 'to ship it.

LMT

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2021, 07:11:40 pm »
Not if I bought at a low pricing ebb in the market. AFAIK all bike prices both new and secondhand have gone up during this pandemic. So my fair value is what I paid for it but market value could be a few hundred more. That I don't know but I am guessing that pandemic prices have increased with a lot of exercise, fitness and sports equipment.

No you paid the market value, because this how much the bike sold for. The person selling the bike would have sold it at their fair value.

Since that time the market value has gone up which could inpact your fair value.

Out of interest what bike did you buy?

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2021, 07:51:05 pm »
If someone's willing to pay, then it's a fair price. But I do get the moral dilemma. With low volume stuff it's also hard to know, but I seriously doubt you're going to get anything more than double, which in itself isn't going to make you rich. You might set a low price and get no one. You might set a high price and get 3 offers, luck of the draw - and often how ride-able it is on selling. A little of your time & expense to refresh the chain, brake blocks, cables and tyres might also make you feel a bit better at the price you sell it at.
Cruzbike V2k, S40

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2021, 10:16:01 pm »
My dilemma is that I bought it from a guy who was fairly regular at the time on a certain forum and I think he undersold it. I think that having owned it for some time and realising it's a really well maintained bike that performs well. It's a streetmachine GT from HP Velotech. He sold it onto someone who would look after it and enjoy it, me, and I got the impression he did so because he wasn't using it as much as it deserved. Kind of like me now. A good bike should be ridden even if it's getting on a bit.

I'm not that sure the GTe version is really that much better. Seat is improved and suspension changed too. Ultimately it was designed and made right from the very first version IMHO.

Since buying it I've basically just maintained it and bought a new seat pad. One of those well padded seats with that very coarse polypropylene mesh outer. The one that drains freely. You can practically ride it dry straight after the rain has stopped pouring on it.

Bikes of all kinds have gone up including niche bikes. There's been a change in bike shops near me too. One went into R&M cargo bikes. Another into electric bikes especially eMTB. Not many in stores round here before pandemic for sure.

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Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2021, 04:30:32 am »
It depends I guess. Deep down you seem to feel that the guy who sold it to you did a kind thing as part of a community. Upthread you have an asocial person telling you that people don't matter. Only money matters. I guess you have to just chart your own way between those two points.

PaulF

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Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2021, 06:15:45 am »
If you feel guilty at selling it for more than you paid then why not give the person that you bought it from a share of the “profit”?

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2021, 07:27:20 am »
. You did not buy it to make a quick profit, you’ve owned it , ridden it, improved it, and for what ever reason , are now selling it. Personally , I would take advantage of the current situation, the fact that HP won’t be selling any bikes in uk for a good while, summers coming , and there is a bit of a new ‘bent buzz I feel. Say you paid £500 ( was this the black one from Scotland?  Whilst searching for mine I came across the old advert, and it was VERYcheap , but this was the advertised price, not a special, personal , deal) and it’s in reasonable nick, then on a forum  such as this, I would say £700 would be reasonable,and a stonking bargain, as you’ve maintained/ improved it. But on EBay you might get more, it’s a open market. I think to put on forum for £900 would be a bit strong, but up to you. On eBay recently, an ‘Action bent’ bike went for £568 needing tlc, 2 days later it was back with pumped up tyres and a rack  bag , for £1100, now £950, not sold. Don’t feel guilty, SM’s are excellent bikes, I ride mine, then ride my upwrong, and can’t understand why folks would be so uncomfortable,  but they don’t suit all situations, and not always suitable as a ‘go to ‘ bike, so tend to get put in the attic! Don’t they ! 😊.  When looking for one I was keen on one in Leeds for £900 on gumtree, haggled them down to £700 , but backed out. Soon after it was sold, only to reappear on e bag some 4 months later for £1200 (GTE) , the new owner had genuinely bought it, used it, and didn’t get on, and also didn’t complain about getting a wee bit more money.

Re: Selling on a secondhand recumbent- etiquette?
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2021, 09:00:32 am »
If you feel guilty at selling it for more than you paid then why not give the person that you bought it from a share of the “profit”?
That's surely got to be the way ahead.
Sell it for as much as you can and split the profit with the previous owner.
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