Author Topic: Haggis  (Read 3910 times)

ElyDave

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Re: Haggis
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2021, 10:40:51 am »
I recently found out that swede is a contraction of Swedish Turnip, so neeps = swede makes sense.
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Haggis
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2021, 10:45:47 am »
I recently found out that swede is a contraction of Swedish Turnip, so neeps = swede makes sense.
My dad also refers to swede as turnip which also confuses matters.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Haggis
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2021, 10:50:15 am »
Swede is yellower than turnip.

What about bageys?
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Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Haggis
« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2021, 11:11:10 am »
Swede is yellower than turnip.

What about bageys?
Bogeys are yellow too but I've never heard them called turnips.
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jiberjaber

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Re: Haggis
« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2021, 11:12:48 am »
I recently found out that swede is a contraction of Swedish Turnip, so neeps = swede makes sense.
My dad also refers to swede as turnip which also confuses matters.

Sweeds were always turnips until I moved down South then I discovered the smaller white ones.  We also used to hollow out and use them as lanterns for Halloween.
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Joergen

Re: Haggis
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2021, 11:13:12 am »
Swede is yellower than turnip.

What about bageys?
In Scotland (or some part of Aberdeenshire at least) what you call a swede is called a turnip. What you call a turnip is called a white turnip.

Re: Haggis
« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2021, 11:34:23 am »
I recently found out that swede is a contraction of Swedish Turnip, so neeps = swede makes sense.
My dad also refers to swede as turnip which also confuses matters.

Sweeds were always turnips until I moved down South then I discovered the smaller white ones.  We also used to hollow out and use them as lanterns for Halloween.
I had forgotten the Halloween thing.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Haggis
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2021, 11:52:49 am »
I was disappointed in the US to find that the excitingly named rutabaga turned out to be a swede.

Turnips are a variety of Brassica rapa (as is pok choi and of course, rape – which Americans can't say, so have to call it something else– fact fans), swedes are a variety of B. napus, a cross of B. rapa and B. oleracea – basically a cabbage did it with the turnip and they had a big baby.

Kohlrabi is a german turnip, that's pure cabbage.

Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, sprouts kale, etc. are all the same species (B. oleracea).
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Re: Haggis
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2021, 12:42:48 pm »
Swede is yellower than turnip.

What about bageys?
In Scotland (or some part of Aberdeenshire at least) what you call a swede is called a turnip. What you call a turnip is called a white turnip.

As I discovered when I moved to Scotland. Though being from Suffolk, I'm quite happy to eat swede.

Oddly enough my wife, who is from Foreign Parts, had never come across the vegetable before. As she rather liked the taste, she asked her mother whether anyone ate it in her home country. "Yes", came the reply. "Prisoners of war."

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Haggis
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2021, 12:52:33 pm »
Nope, not here. Neep = swede.
Often to be found lying in fields for sheep feed.
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ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Haggis
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2021, 01:25:55 pm »
Swede is yellower than turnip.

What about bageys?
In Scotland (or some part of Aberdeenshire at least) what you call a swede is called a turnip. What you call a turnip is called a white turnip.

As I discovered when I moved to Scotland. Though being from Suffolk, I'm quite happy to eat swede.

Oddly enough my wife, who is from Foreign Parts, had never come across the vegetable before. As she rather liked the taste, she asked her mother whether anyone ate it in her home country. "Yes", came the reply. "Prisoners of war."

As mrs P notes, I've heard the same re cattle feed.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Haggis
« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2021, 01:28:02 pm »
Bageys are often found in fields of sheep too. In Northumberland.
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citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Haggis
« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2021, 01:30:59 pm »
I've always understood 'neeps' to refer to what I as a sassenach call swede.

We used to observe Burns Night for my Scottish mother-in-law's benefit but haven't done so for a few years, since she died. But we have haggis every now and again as the mood takes us - as I mentioned elsewhere recently, it's too good to be eaten only once a year. Always a treat.

Macsween's is good but the best haggis I ever had was from Cockburn's in Dingwall, when we were visiting my wife's relatives up there.
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ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Haggis
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2021, 01:42:55 pm »
Neeps should be swedes, turnips taste different and won't mash up right.

I'm a bit meh on haggis, it's all right, but I wouldn't eat it often (which seems to be the general view).
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Haggis
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2021, 01:58:14 pm »
English <-> Scottish
Swede. <-> Turnip,neep
Turnip. <->   White turnip,neep

You can convert one turnip variety into the other by boiling with sweaty socks.

Haggis is traditionally served in batter with chips.


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Re: Haggis
« Reply #40 on: January 26, 2021, 03:03:14 pm »

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Haggis
« Reply #41 on: January 26, 2021, 03:06:57 pm »
A [Scottish] friend of mine blamed the English for haggis, on the grounds that the only reason to eat it is to demonstrate sufficient national pride.
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Mrs Pingu

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Re: Haggis
« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2021, 05:19:01 pm »
A whole haggis is too much, really. It's one of those things I like for the first couple of mouthfuls and then it all gets a bit much.
Can eat plenty neeps though, as long as they're covered in black pepper.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Haggis
« Reply #43 on: January 26, 2021, 05:26:03 pm »
Yes, I remember the first time I had haggis, I thought it was actually quite nice, but after a modest portion, I wasn't particularly enticed by a second helping. The general view was to get it over with for the year on Burn's night and be done for the year.

That said, I had flatmates who had it on pizza fairly regularly. But they were from Stirling, which made them very special.
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Hot Flatus

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Re: Haggis
« Reply #44 on: January 26, 2021, 05:35:25 pm »
Careful.

My children are 1/4 Stirling, and if you don't watch what you say I'll send them round to yours for the old surprise visit



TheLurker

  • Goes well with magnolia.
Re: Haggis
« Reply #45 on: January 26, 2021, 05:37:44 pm »
A whole haggis is too much, really.
McSweens* sell ones that are a little larger than a chip shop black pudding and they make a very pleasant meal for one. It says 2-3 on the label, but that's a lie.


*Back inna dawn of time when I was a PSO the shop was but a hop, skip and stagger* from the hovel I called home and I was immensely pleased to see them when they appeared (as if by magic) in our local supermarket a few years ago.



*After closing time. :)
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ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Haggis
« Reply #46 on: January 26, 2021, 05:43:01 pm »
Careful.

My children are 1/4 Stirling, and if you don't watch what you say I'll send them round to yours for the old surprise visit




Yeah, that's Stirling. The younger brother went to work in the US, not realising that you needed to be 21 to drink. Not drinking was inconceivable to him, it's the only antidote to being from Stirling.

Anyway, when I went to visit him, his room was full – literally – of booze. Crates, bottles, you name it. He'd turned himself into the Al Capone of illicit hooch for the local university campus. I'm you do know this is probably very illegal to which his response was och, it's only beer. For some reason, he was never caught, though I suspect he could have drunk the evidence if pressed.

Also, not one person in the US could understand a word he said.
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Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Haggis
« Reply #47 on: January 26, 2021, 05:45:00 pm »
I love haggis, faggots*, black pudding, white pudding and other offal related products.  About the only things I don't like is tripe and andouillette (the French really don't know how to cook offal).







*Both types.
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Hot Flatus

  • Mediocre polyglot.Scoutmaster and nudist
Re: Haggis
« Reply #48 on: January 26, 2021, 05:57:41 pm »
Careful.

My children are 1/4 Stirling, and if you don't watch what you say I'll send them round to yours for the old surprise visit




Yeah, that's Stirling. The younger brother went to work in the US, not realising that you needed to be 21 to drink. Not drinking was inconceivable to him, it's the only antidote to being from Stirling.

Anyway, when I went to visit him, his room was full – literally – of booze. Crates, bottles, you name it. He'd turned himself into the Al Capone of illicit hooch for the local university campus. I'm you do know this is probably very illegal to which his response was och, it's only beer. For some reason, he was never caught, though I suspect he could have drunk the evidence if pressed.

Also, not one person in the US could understand a word he said.

The first time I went up there and met my would-be kids great-grandmother (her son, would-be grandfather died that year...alcoholic, like his dad) I knocked on her door and and seconds before it opened would-be Mrs Flatus said " Shit! I forgot to warn you she's got three fingers missing on her hand!"

Door opened, white haired octogenarian looked at me and proferred a stump with only a thumb and a vestigial little finger to shake. I shook it, but I'm pretty sure she heard my internal scream. She'd lost the fingers in a loom, working in a mill when she was 12.  Didn't seem to affect her badly though and she went on to gas her 8 year old son's pet rabbit as a punishment.

Yeah...Stirling.

Right, better go and give the kids my car keys and your address.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Haggis
« Reply #49 on: January 26, 2021, 06:44:43 pm »
A whole haggis is too much, really.
McSweens* sell ones that are a little larger than a chip shop black pudding and they make a very pleasant meal for one. It says 2-3 on the label, but that's a lie.


*Back inna dawn of time when I was a PSO the shop was but a hop, skip and stagger* from the hovel I called home and I was immensely pleased to see them when they appeared (as if by magic) in our local supermarket a few years ago.



*After closing time. :)

McSweens, Bruntsfield...?
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