Author Topic: favouritekitchenthings  (Read 20560 times)

Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #25 on: 09 June, 2021, 03:34:47 pm »

Oh, And my gralefruit knife.
Gralefruit = typo in the lunchtime menu of one of the episodes of Fawlty Towers.


A grapefruit knife!  I've not seen one of those for ages.  Probably about the time my family stopped eating grapefruit due to my fathers blood pressure medication.
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #26 on: 09 June, 2021, 03:58:16 pm »
I can't eat grapefruit either, as I'm on daily anti-histamines.

I'm not sure how widely known it is that you shouldn't eat grapefruit (or have the juice) if you're taking hayfever medication, but there you go.

I used to have a grapefruit knife. You can still get them.

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #27 on: 09 June, 2021, 04:04:08 pm »
The last time I drank grapefruit juice it felt like I'd stripped the enamel off my teeth, so I've avoided it ever since.   
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ian

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #28 on: 09 June, 2021, 05:04:42 pm »
Don't inadvertently mistake the grapefruit juice carton for the milk and put it in your coffee, wander back to your office, and take a big gulp.

As they say in tasting circles, citrus notes.

Grapefruit juice (all citrus, there's just generally more in grapefruit) contains a category of chemicals called psoralens which inhibit a key form of cytochrome p450 (an enzyme, mostly in the liver) that is involved in drug metabolism, so those drugs normally broken down by this cytochrome build up in the system and have a much longer half-life.
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #29 on: 09 June, 2021, 05:21:07 pm »
OT: whereas this word always makes me think of Vivian Stanshall on Tubular Bells.  As does “pangolin”.  I'd pay good money to watch Mike Oldfield trying to play a pangolin.

So, thanks to you, Mr L, not only have I had Tubular Bells as an earworm all afternoon, I've been driving myself mad by trying to replace all the names of instruments with names of animals*. I've run aground though - I got as far as "two slightly taller giraffes" and that has broken me. I can't carry on. I am officially useless for the rest of the day.


*surprised Weird Al Yankovic hasn't done this already.
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #30 on: 09 June, 2021, 05:25:31 pm »
Plus…

(click to show/hide)

My work here is done. Goodnight.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #31 on: 09 June, 2021, 05:32:19 pm »
Reed and pine bunting?

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #32 on: 09 June, 2021, 05:41:35 pm »
My Baby Boa Constrictor strap wrench.
Means EVERY and jar is openable, without damaging the top/lid.
I've often thought of buying a second one, to hold the jar itself.

Might be a tad awkward to stop them unravelling but these things are hardly expensive or bulky, unlike some things mentioned upthread. You could splash out!

Given that you live in France, where screw cap bulbs abound, you could justify one for lamp fittings...

citoyen

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #33 on: 09 June, 2021, 06:12:09 pm »
Reed and pine bunting?

Excellent!  ;D

Now, how about coming up with one for glockenspiel? (starting to think this needs to be split off into a thread of its own...)
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #34 on: 09 June, 2021, 07:42:10 pm »
Goldfinches
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

ian

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #35 on: 09 June, 2021, 07:54:16 pm »
And finally, a topic I start becomes too cryptic even for me to understand.
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #36 on: 09 June, 2021, 07:56:41 pm »
So much stuff. I'm fortunate to have a well equipped kitchen with many things that do their job well, and are satisfying, like exoglass bread tins, microplane graters, magimix, they are all favourites in their own ways but not so much to call out as favourite.

So.

#1 has to be my dick knives

After that, coffee production kit (Rancillio & Eureka) is a relatively recent addition, and much appreciated. My venerable pressed steel frying pan would be very hard to replace and sees a lot of service. Otherwise, favourites tend to be little things picked up around the world, like a lime squeezer from Mexico, a cherry stoner from a French market, a falafel plonker from Jerusalem (what would you call something that shapes the mixture and plonks it in the oil?), you get the idea.

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #37 on: 09 June, 2021, 08:14:59 pm »
Reed and pine bunting?

Excellent!  ;D

Now, how about coming up with one for glockenspiel? (starting to think this needs to be split off into a thread of its own...)

“Grand piano” is obviously “Giant panda”.
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #38 on: 09 June, 2021, 08:18:52 pm »
So much stuff. I'm fortunate to have a well equipped kitchen with many things that do their job well, and are satisfying, like exoglass bread tins, microplane graters, magimix, they are all favourites in their own ways but not so much to call out as favourite.

So.

#1 has to be my dick knives


A well handled Dick is an impressive thing.  There are plenty of interesting instructional videos available on the web.......   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1bvHHxu4Dg
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #39 on: 09 June, 2021, 08:57:06 pm »
Hmm. Probably the Brabantia sauté pan we bought as an add-on to a sofa from Cargo nearly 20 years ago. The food processor that my wife bought 30 or so years ago. The Prestige pressure cooker. And the Jamie Oliver knife block set, adequate for my needs.
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ian

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #40 on: 09 June, 2021, 09:19:43 pm »
I had a wobbly stainless steel pan (I think we inherited it from my wife's grandmother when she went into a home) – I suspect it might have gone back to WW2, the rivets were coming loose. Still, I can't look up these days without seeing a bloody Spitfire, so I guess some stuff lasts. Anyway, I neglected using it because I figured at some point the important pan part of it would – complete with hot food – fall on my toes. Probably better than a Spitfire though.

That pair of replacement stainless steel pans I bought the other week have been awesome though. I got a lot of fond going on. They're proper heavy enough to spang a charging rhino into insensibility. If I dropped one I'd probably crack the Earth's crust and Kent would fall into the sea.
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #41 on: 09 June, 2021, 10:00:29 pm »
....And the Jamie Oliver knife block set, adequate for my needs.

Does it come with the obligatory drizzle of olive oil?     

ian

  • why would any decent person have such thoughts?
Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #42 on: 09 June, 2021, 10:04:21 pm »
I like Jamie Oliver. I'd keep him in my kitchen.

Of all the chefs I'd like to have dinner with, Anthony Bourdain is still winning. I'm not planning to be early for that meal though.
Authoritarian Thought Leader, the Pol Pot of Powerpoint, the Stalin of Spreadsheets, the Putin of pandas

Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #43 on: 09 June, 2021, 11:07:42 pm »
Props to those stainless steel pans. Carbon steel Sabatier knife here, decades  old but the only reliable way to slice tomatoes.
Otherwise, wooden spoons... (impossible to stir pots with anything else) , chopping boards and our swoony gold-flecked black granite worktops. (But don't get me started on the spice drawers...)

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #44 on: 10 June, 2021, 07:43:35 am »
According to my very big OED subscription, mandolin is an accepted spelling (the original British spelling, -e came from the US), though I know someone would seize on the confusion and imagine me attacking fennel with a string instrument. I know I did. You could probably slice an egg with one.

Or you might persuade a pedant to strum the kitchen variety. ;D
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T42

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #45 on: 10 June, 2021, 07:50:27 am »
My Baby Boa Constrictor strap wrench.
Means EVERY and jar is openable, without damaging the top/lid.
I've often thought of buying a second one, to hold the jar itself.

Might be a tad awkward to stop them unravelling but these things are hardly expensive or bulky, unlike some things mentioned upthread. You could splash out!

Given that you live in France, where screw cap bulbs abound, you could justify one for lamp fittings...

Funnily enough, the most recalcitrant bulbs I've come across have been the bayonet-cap variety, where the solder contacts have softened and espoused the shape of the contacts in the socket. Given that you have to push in and then twist hard, the chances of leaving the cap in the socket are much higher than with an Edison screw.
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight

Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #46 on: 10 June, 2021, 09:06:58 am »
The bread knife we bought from a French supermarket a decade or so ago.
My Le Creuset cast iron grill pan
An Ikea chefs knife that never fails to take an edge and I use for cutting up most things
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #47 on: 10 June, 2021, 09:32:57 am »
Apropos of sous-vide, which I think is basically a foot spa you are using to cook food (and I don't have either, but if someone gives me an excuse), I asked myself what are the best things in my kitchen:

  • […] mandolin

OT: whereas this word always makes me think of Vivian Stanshall on Tubular Bells.  As does “pangolin”.  I'd pay good money to watch Mike Oldfield trying to play a pangolin.
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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #48 on: 10 June, 2021, 10:09:57 am »
Stick blender. Home made Mayo takes longer to wash the thing than make the mayo.

I bake, so all the measuring spoons.
Also, I love this which I inherited from my best friend's dad.

My pickled veg I shred in the food processor. But the julienned salads are done with a microplane mandoline. While I wear the glove.


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Re: favouritekitchenthings
« Reply #49 on: 10 June, 2021, 10:17:51 am »
Slow cooker.
Mango slicer.
Quote
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