Author Topic: Have you been out today - non-cycling  (Read 1463 times)

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Have you been out today - non-cycling
« on: 26 April, 2022, 07:06:50 pm »
I don't think I've seen a thread for this kind of thing, and the other thread is in the Rides and Touring board.
If there is, point me to it and I'll move this.

Anyways, I found myself on the West Coast this weekend, for dinner at the excellent Three Chimneys on Skye.
On the way home, we stopped to take in a hike of the Forcan Ridge.

I've been playing with a website called Fatmap, which can connect to data sources like Strava, and plot them on a pretty 3D sat view.
(I use this for ski tracks, mostly).
But I see it has a 'share' function, so I thought I'd test it here.
I'm not sure how well it works if you don't have a login, so this is just a test really.

https://fatmap.com/adventureid/31702476/the-saddle-forcan-ridge-and-sgurr-na-sgine?fmid=cp


Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #1 on: 26 April, 2022, 08:44:03 pm »
Yes that works well on Ubuntu/Vivaldi. A thoroughly good day there.
Tha rothaireachd math dhut.

cygnet

  • I'm part of the association
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #2 on: 26 April, 2022, 09:52:33 pm »
No.  :'(
Reasonably Inconsiderate

Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #3 on: 26 April, 2022, 10:14:45 pm »
Works on Firefox on Windows 10, thx!

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #4 on: 26 April, 2022, 10:37:36 pm »
My initial suspicion is that Fatmap is downloading a very large amount of image data in the first instance.
Then, I think it is doing a lot of 3D rendering on the local machine.

On my faster machines, the imagery loads as low-resolution initially, then fills in the detail, much like interlaced images from the dial-up days of the Internet. This takes around 3 seconds, but then scrolls around easily.

On my fondleslab on the same Internet connection, it grinds to a point, then just fails to proceed.

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #5 on: 26 April, 2022, 10:49:24 pm »
I was on my first proper hike in donkeys for a club mates final Corbet on Aonach Buidhe.
I buggered off home on Sunday and fell asleep in the car (I wasn't driving btw.) and in my bed within minutes of arrival.
I also fell asleep during the party...

Others did Forcan Ridge on Sunday, it looks a tad beyond my comfort zone.

https://www.yogile.com/dmc-2022-04-22/024853908l/share/?vsc=1087652c2

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #6 on: 27 April, 2022, 12:23:42 am »
I have been to exotic Shepherds Bush.  And back.  The Man has changed the route of the W15 between Whipps Cross hostipal and Leytonstone station so it goes along the Whipps Cross Road and down the High Road instead of faffing around in the residential backwaters of Leytonstone, which takes ages at hours 18:00 of the clock chiz.  Wuffo they do that ???
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

ian

  • why would any decent person have such thoughts?
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #7 on: 27 April, 2022, 09:18:48 am »
My initial suspicion is that Fatmap is downloading a very large amount of image data in the first instance.
Then, I think it is doing a lot of 3D rendering on the local machine.

On my faster machines, the imagery loads as low-resolution initially, then fills in the detail, much like interlaced images from the dial-up days of the Internet. This takes around 3 seconds, but then scrolls around easily.

On my fondleslab on the same Internet connection, it grinds to a point, then just fails to proceed.

Works fine on a fancy new M1 iPad. Less impressive with English hills, of course.
Authoritarian Thought Leader, the Pol Pot of Powerpoint, the Stalin of Spreadsheets, the Putin of pandas

Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #8 on: 27 April, 2022, 11:22:04 am »
My initial suspicion is that Fatmap is downloading a very large amount of image data in the first instance.
Then, I think it is doing a lot of 3D rendering on the local machine.

On my faster machines, the imagery loads as low-resolution initially, then fills in the detail, much like interlaced images from the dial-up days of the Internet. This takes around 3 seconds, but then scrolls around easily.

On my fondleslab on the same Internet connection, it grinds to a point, then just fails to proceed.

My works HP lappy (gen 7 i7 "second user") loaded it no problem in Chrome, less that 10 seconds, half of which was the splash screen.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #9 on: 27 April, 2022, 11:31:27 am »
I've been playing with a website called Fatmap, which can connect to data sources like Strava, and plot them on a pretty 3D sat view.
(I use this for ski tracks, mostly).
But I see it has a 'share' function, so I thought I'd test it here.
I'm not sure how well it works if you don't have a login, so this is just a test really.

https://fatmap.com/adventureid/31702476/the-saddle-forcan-ridge-and-sgurr-na-sgine?fmid=cp

Very snappy to load on Chrome onna two-month-old middling-spec FruitCo fondleslab.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Wombat

  • Is it supposed to hurt this much?
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #10 on: 27 April, 2022, 03:33:10 pm »
Well, yesterday I did indeed go out, sans bike.  However, t'was no fun, as it was a duty visit to ancient crumbling mother who'd just been released from hospital.  Left home at 0500, got back home about 1715 or so, having driven in excess of 400 miles, largely across country.  400 miles driving for a visit which my remaining family and my mother had been demanding loudly, and lasted about an hour and a half till mother made it plain she no longer wanted me there.  Only useful bit of the journey was to call in at Sainsbury's in Hedge End for shopping unavailable in the wilds of Wales, and to Hobbycraft in (Urgh!) Swindon or thereabouts, to buy some picture frames to match the others on the wall, for our gallery of assorted pets.  When I informed the lady in Hobbycraft that I can't get such stuff in Wales, she proudly announced that there is a Hobbycraft in Cardiff.  Well maybe there is, but "down there" is almost another country, and its around 100 miles away.

One reassuring bit, although 400 miles in one day is a fair old trek, driving my 8 year old Skoda Citigo across everything from muddy country lanes to the M4, was pleasant and efficient.  But then, we occasionally use one of them (the other is 10 years and 95k miles old) for blasting across France for 450 miles at close to the autoroute limit, so I should know that, but its nice to be reminded.
Wombat

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #11 on: 04 May, 2022, 08:21:35 am »
Went out for a hikelet yesterday. Bus to Keynsham, then walk up the Chew, past the mill, through the cow fields, across the hare field, cross the river again and the back way to Marksbury avoiding Burnett. Then a bit of path I'd not used before, which took me past two playful pigs (mostly pink with black heads and rumps), over the stony fields and up the hill to Stantonbury. Have a snooze, make some tea. Down again past the pigs but then turn left, start walking down the track that is actually in the stream, and then left again into Compton Dando. The follow the Chew again. Interrupted by various breaks to make tea using my new, shiny, tiny (really tiny) stove what I "won".
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #12 on: 10 May, 2022, 08:39:24 pm »
That link works perfectly on a five year old MacBook.  Neat day out.
Rust never sleeps

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #13 on: 07 July, 2022, 08:59:14 pm »
My sister has been over from NZ for a few weeks, mostly visiting Mother Dear.
Before heading back, we'd agreed to Go Up a Hill.
And so we did.

This is Liathach, one of the major Torridonian hills, complete with airy pinnacles and all.

It wasn't very wet all of the time.

https://fatmap.com/adventureid/36110154/liathach

If you follow the 'View on Strava' link, you'll get some photos too.



FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #14 on: 07 July, 2022, 09:30:32 pm »
On Saturday I went up Norman's Law, Fife with a friend and dugs, my foot behaved, my lungs behaved, my HR nearly didn't.
On Wednesday I went up Mount Hill (That hill with the monument you see on the A92 in North Fife), with same friend, her Dug and another club mate, my foot didn't behave, my lungs and HR did behave.

I will be further testing out my walking ability at the weekend, I am packing the Factor Duffel Coat, so it's my fault if this weather breaks early.

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #15 on: 23 July, 2022, 09:44:43 pm »
A bit of an exploration of local history today.

Cowie Stop Line - Part 1


Cowie_1 by Ron Lowe, on Flickr

If you have ever cycled to Stonehaven over the Slug and then taken the Swanley road, you may have noticed the concrete cubes and pillbox defending Haugh Head bridge over the Cowie Water near Bossholes horsey farm and wondered what his was for.  Why the defences on this little bridge crossing such a modest little river?

I found the answer to this in the book 'The Hidden Ways', by Alistair Moffat.

When Norway fell in June 1940, that opened up a potential invasion route into Britain: across the North Sea, landing at the poorly-defended beaches between Findhorn and Stonehaven.  These beaches had shallow sandy approaches suitable for landing, and inland access.  South of Stonehaven, the coast becomes rockier with sea cliffs defending them.

But the Grampian mountains provide a natural defence line, with few natural crossing points, which could be defended: The Cairnwell pass was defended at the Devil's Elbow, and the Cairn o'Mount at the Bridge of Dye.  However, the mountains peter out towards the sea, leaving a vulnerable gap between Fetteresso forest and Stonehaven: The Stonehaven Gap.

The line of the modest Cowie Water was chosen as a defensive Stop Line to stop or at least slow the progress of a German Panzer invasion through the Stonehaven Gap.  This modest little river has steep banks along much of it, rendering it impassable by tracked vehicles.  Those vulnerable parts of the river, where the banks were flat, or there were bridges, were defended with concrete cubes and pillboxes: the Cowie Stop Line.

Many of the defensive features can still be found, of you follow the line of the Cowie.

I set off from Stonehaven along the South bank of the Cowie, starting at the bridge.  The first evidence of the line can be seen straight away: several concrete cubes at the NW corner of the bridge, covered in undergrowth.  I head up the road which follows the river, leading to the football pitches.  After a few hundred metres we come to the cricket pitches on the left, and a grassy clearing on the right, overlooking the river.  On the far side of the river, I can see the first of the pillboxes, covering the flat ground where the cricket and football pitches now are.

This road continues as far as the railway viaduct, and I pass under the vast tall piers. It is not possible to follow the river bank closely here, the undergrowth is too dense. I have to follow a path up and into the school playing fields, where a rough path follows the perimeter.  The river is down to my right, at the bottom of a steep-sided gorge.  I make a couple of exploratory forays part-way down, one to examine a weir who's function is not clear to me.  At the end of the playing field, a small path heads off to cross under the A90 bridge.

Beyond the bridge, the way is barred.  It is fenced off because of the vast Ury Estate development.  I ignore the closure and climb over, and very soon find myself at the edge of a building site, all trace of the path gone.  Work appears to have been abandoned on this section of the development: there are concrete foundations with years of undergrowth coming up through them.  I try to avoid the site, and skirt around it following the course of the river as closely as possible.  The dense undergrowth makes this very difficult, and my shorts were possibly not the best choice.

I eventually come out directly across the river from Ury House at a small metal bridge which looks like it's recently been re-built with fresh steelwork.  Here, there are concrete blocks at the bridge, and a pillbox overlooking it.  I know there is a second pillbox, but that took a lot of finding; it is well hidden in dense undergrowth of the scratchiest kind.  My legs are cut to shreds.

I follow the rough service road along the line of the river, till I reach a magnificent viaduct which was obviously once the main approach to Ury House from the Slug road.  This is defended with concrete blocks, and a pillbox on the North West side of the bridge. Far below this high viaduct is a much smaller and older bridge, but I could not see any defences around it.  I briefly explored a little around here, coming across the ruined walled garden of Ury House.

Deciding I have enough scratches and cuts on my legs for one day, I follow the estate road back to the Slug road, and then the easy way back to Stonehaven.

https://www.strava.com/activities/7515130775

In the unlikely event anyone has any historical interest in this, then a good starting point would be Gordon Barclay's 2005 survey:
https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-352-1/dissemination/pdf/vol_135/135_119_161.pdf



Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #16 on: 02 August, 2022, 01:25:19 pm »
Continuing the local history thing...

Cowie Stop Line - Part 2


Cowie Stop Line - Stage 2 by Ron Lowe, on Flickr



A continuation of my exploration of the Cowie Stop Line - a series of defences along the line of the Cowie Water in an attempt to plug the Stonehaven Gap which would have allowed invading forces to pass South, avoiding the Grampian mountains.

I start at the point I finished Part 1, the Ury Viaduct. There is no further path along the South bank of the river here, and it is all private land.  So I cross the viaduct and follow a farm track on the North side, heading to the Findlayson Bridge, which carries the Slug road over the Cowie near Mowtie.

This track has recently been improved, and I come to see why: it descends to riverbank level, where a large section of flood plain has been cleared for development!  I follow the obvious bulldozer track to the end of the clearing, where it stops abruptly at a large pile of cleared tree debris.  Inspecting the line of trees beyond reveals a small chink, and this leads to a small but very clear path continuing directly beside the river.

A short distance along this path, I see the first evidence of the defences on this section: a row of 15 concrete cubes interspersed between large old Beeches on the South bank.  Beyond here the path becomes less distinct, but nonetheless leads me all the way to the Fildlaystone Bridge, at river level.

I cross under the bridge, and up the bank on the upstream side.  Crossing the bridge, I can see the pillbox with a commanding view over the bridge, but it takes a bit of looking because it's rather buried under fallen trees from the January storms.  The path continues into the woods here, leading to the riverbank where the Cowie enters a steep-sided gorge.  No further progress is possible here, so I have to scramble up a fairly steep bank to gain a track above.

After perhaps half a k, this path splits, with the main track gaining height to the left and a more minor fishermans path heading down to the riverbank to the right.  I take the less-troden path (.. "perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear"), well actually because I wanted to follow the river as best I could!
This leads to a clearing in a tree lined glade where the water is dark and deep; a fisherman's bench sits here, with a plaque proclaiming it to be the Gove Pool.  Beyond the Gove Pool, the path wends its way into a large circular clearing, encircled with massive beech trees, which meet at their tops creating a vast vaulted ceiling; a cathedral of trees.  Some brave soul has climbed one of these, and tied a rope many tens of metres up, creating the most magnificent Tarzan swing I have ever seen!

Beyond here, things take a turn for the worse. The paths on the OS maps towards Swanley simply don't exist on the ground.  At least not at this time of year.  The bracken is taller than me, and is basically impenetrable.  But being the thran sort, I push on anyway.  It takes a very long time to travel about 1k through this,  and by the time I reach the Swanley road, I find I'd lost my glasses somewhere along the way.

Once on the Swanley road, I jog down to Bossholes farm and the Haugh Head bridge.  There are two pillboxes here; the obvious one high on the hillside overlooking the bridge, but there's a second one downstream of the bridge, on the edge of a horsey field.

This is very difficult to get to, and I end up wading down the Cowie.  The riverbed is very slippery!  But this gives me a view of the confluence with the small Burn of Day, where there is a series of concrete blocks, which I would have missed if I'd done the sensible thing and crossed the field!  I reach the last pillbox, and sensibly cross the field back to the road.

I decide not to re-trace, but to follow the Slug road back to my starting point.  But I notice that there seems to be a short-cut track from the bridge, reaching the Slug road at Bogheadly.  This works well, and cuts off a long loop via Mergie.

So I am home in time to cook my bits of dinner, with a pair of shorts that would do an eight-year-old proud, and legs that are stinging and ripped.  Again.

ian

  • why would any decent person have such thoughts?
Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #17 on: 02 August, 2022, 01:48:51 pm »
Not dissimilar, though the Jungles of Surrey edition. I plotted a nice circular route from Ockley though Walliswood and Forest Green up to Leith Hill and down the other side, around to Capel and back to the car. The first half went fine, the second half less so, we emerged less from a stroll through affluent Surrey looking more like we trekked through the jungle of a minor war zone. The footpaths passed through some large, un-waymarked fields in the second half, which was OK, if fiddlesome and required some tedious orientation around field boundaries. It would have a lot harder without GPS, since the OS footpaths didn't align with the current reality.

Then The Missing Footpath. It should have been there, on the other side of the road, where a new house was being built. But it was just a fenced-off building site. It wasn't even clear where the footpath should have gone (or we'd have barged through). So we ended up walking down the A29 which is several shades of unfun to take the next footpath, which took us into a field of neck-high ready-to-harvest oilseed rape with no evident way of passing through or around other than the wade. It was a big field. That took us into the valley of savage brambles and an obstacle course of fallen trees to the rotten steps up to the A24 (the steps up to a rotten sign by the dual carriagewaywere the only clue a path existed). It got a bit better after that, though our blood loss was significant enough to require a beer transfusion at the end. The various detours and reorientation added an unplanned 5km to the total (came in at 32 km in the end).

Will have to grink the authorities about the missing path – I presume the building work removed it, but it wasn't clear where it had ever gone and all the aerial imagery seems too recent for clues.
Authoritarian Thought Leader, the Pol Pot of Powerpoint, the Stalin of Spreadsheets, the Putin of pandas

Re: Have you been out today - non-cycling
« Reply #18 on: 02 August, 2022, 10:54:28 pm »
Continuing the local history thing...

Thanks for that.  Very interesting.  I live close to the remains of one of the big defensive lines to the NE of London.  I have always been fascinated with spotting the ghostly tank traps, pillboxes and mortar bases that still remain in the local landscape, either as part of that defensive line or as an element of one of the many airfield defences around the area.  I had no idea there was a similar defensive stop line on the east coast of Scotland.

As for my non-cycling trip today, a beautiful walk in Lorne Doone country from Malmsmead in Exmoor.  Not too strenuous, a short climb, a leg out across open moorland in the wind and drizzle and a return leg down the river valley.  Very enjoyable and another good excuse for another Devon cream tea.