Author Topic: A random thread for small things that don't really warrant a thread of their own  (Read 2377267 times)

We’ve had a Hurricane (aircraft) stooging about several times over the last month (we’re close to RAF Halton, and the passing out parades get a flypast), according to Flightradar24 it was built in Canada in 1942 and served its time there. Anyway, today we had the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Avro Lancaster do a couple of circuits at c800ft. Glorious noise.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Quote
4. Cut back on car washing
If you need to wash your car, do it the old-fashioned way with a bucket and soap rather than hosing it down. The water contained in a bucket (roughly 30 litres) is significantly less than the average that flows through a hose (around 15 litres per minute). Better yet, avoid washing your car entirely during a drought.
No mention of baby elephants...

https://theconversation.com/five-easy-ways-to-use-less-water-at-home-and-not-just-in-a-drought-187885
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
IME lobbing a bucket of water over the car is rarely a water-efficient way to rinse it off.  But then I only wash cars for MOT tests and when something (hopefully not a baby elephant) has shat on the windscreen.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Washing the car is something the garage does when it’s service time.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
We’ve had a Hurricane (aircraft) stooging about several times over the last month (we’re close to RAF Halton, and the passing out parades get a flypast), according to Flightradar24 it was built in Canada in 1942 and served its time there. Anyway, today we had the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Avro Lancaster do a couple of circuits at c800ft. Glorious noise.
Two Spitfires flew over the Scout camp during the week., side by side. Flightradar24 showed them coming out of Biggin Hill, so I guess the two seater sort from the outfit that Jurek had a go with. One was in D Day stripes. The Scouts thought it was brilliant.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

We’ve had a Hurricane (aircraft) stooging about several times over the last month (we’re close to RAF Halton, and the passing out parades get a flypast), according to Flightradar24 it was built in Canada in 1942 and served its time there. Anyway, today we had the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Avro Lancaster do a couple of circuits at c800ft. Glorious noise.
Two Spitfires flew over the Scout camp during the week., side by side. Flightradar24 showed them coming out of Biggin Hill, so I guess the two seater sort from the outfit that Jurek had a go with. One was in D Day stripes. The Scouts thought it was brilliant.

It is. Maybe 15 years ago my wife and I were down at the dead end of the village, leaning on a gate, when the full flight of Lancaster flanked by Hurricane and Spitfire went over at <500ft. The only comparable noise was that of a Vulcan I saw once flying over Thornton Heath (some 60 years ago). Or the Vogon constructor fleet.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Washing the car is something the garage does when it’s service time.

This - call from my local garage (5 mins walk) "you car's ready, passed, no advisories, just being washed now".
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Beardy

  • What’s this do?
  • I’ve always wondered where this was
In other news I have now bought* and downloaded a text on overcoming procrastination and we’ll get around to reading it as soon as I stop finding fewer less important things to do.

*lie. It was free as part of my Kindle membership.
Sorting my life out, one shed at a time.

Bought a replacement Flymo. We have a small amount of uneven grass, ideally suited to said type of mower. The last one (still limping along) we’ve had for 15 years, and the deck is now brittle, worn through at the skirt, and punctured in several places. Replacement was £75 and should see me out  :o
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

I've just ordered a Yamaha Venovo. It's a little plastic saxophone type thing. I plan to wile away the evenings attempting to learn it as the country plunges into recession. I don't even particularly like saxophones that much, it's just I've always wanted to play El Bimbo, the music from the police academy movies that struck up whenever they went near the blue Oyster bar

robgul

  • Cycle:End-to-End webmaster
  • cyclist, Cytech accredited mechanic & woodworker
    • Cycle:End-to-End
I watch quite a lot of YT stuff about woodwork, engineering, DIY etc and never cease to be amazed at the way people pour liquids from a plastic 5 litre (or similar) container that has the cap offset to one side  and slosh the contents all over the place as they pour with the opening at the bottom ???
(like this )

The effect is that the air that has to be displaced causes a surge in the liquid flow - surely people have been taught to pour with the opening at the top so that the air is displaced smoothly?

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
The effect is that the air that has to be displaced causes a surge in the liquid flow - surely people have been taught to pour with the opening at the top so that the air is displaced smoothly?

No, never been taught that, but it's something I've learned from experience.

University of life, mate, innit.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

robgul

  • Cycle:End-to-End webmaster
  • cyclist, Cytech accredited mechanic & woodworker
    • Cycle:End-to-End
The effect is that the air that has to be displaced causes a surge in the liquid flow - surely people have been taught to pour with the opening at the top so that the air is displaced smoothly?

No, never been taught that, but it's something I've learned from experience.

University of life, mate, innit.

I was taught/told at age 12 by the woodwork master at school when pouring out some woodstain!   ..... but then do they still teach woodwork at schools nowadays?

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
surely people have been taught to pour with the opening at the top so that the air is displaced smoothly?

Never been taught it, not done it often enough to work it out through experience, will make a note for the future.   :thumbsup:

T42

  • Patron saint of the dry joint
I was taught/told at age 12 by the woodwork master at school when pouring out some woodstain!   ..... but then do they still teach woodwork at schools nowadays?

I had one year of woodwork at school, then they stopped offering it and turned the workshop into a lab.  All I ever really learnt there was how to cut mortises & tenons.

Wish I had some of those old mortise chisels now...
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
I did woodwork at school, but for some reason pouring liquids out of large plastic containers wasn't part of the curriculum.

A few years ago, I did an NVQ carpentry course. That didn't cover pouring liquids out of large plastic containers either, just shit like how to build a door frame and fit a door in it.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
The effect is that the air that has to be displaced causes a surge in the liquid flow - surely people have been taught to pour with the opening at the top so that the air is displaced smoothly?

No, never been taught that, but it's something I've learned from experience.

University of life, mate, innit.

The handle is in the wrong place to pour it properly. There needs to be an additional handle on the side.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

The effect is that the air that has to be displaced causes a surge in the liquid flow - surely people have been taught to pour with the opening at the top so that the air is displaced smoothly?

No, never been taught that, but it's something I've learned from experience.

University of life, mate, innit.

The handle is in the wrong place to pour it properly. There needs to be an additional handle on the side.

Which is why I’ve always poured that type of container whilst holding it on its side with the spout (in my case) on the right.  Left hand on the handle at the top, right underneath at the back.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

The effect is that the air that has to be displaced causes a surge in the liquid flow - surely people have been taught to pour with the opening at the top so that the air is displaced smoothly?

No, never been taught that, but it's something I've learned from experience.

University of life, mate, innit.

I was taught/told at age 12 by the woodwork master at school when pouring out some woodstain!   ..... but then do they still teach woodwork at schools nowadays?

Well that’s one thing I have learned today.  Never taught that at school, never really taught anything practical at school.  That’s the benefit of an expensive grammar school education!  It’s obvious now you say it, but it hadn’t occurred to me.

TheLurker

  • Goes well with magnolia.
I've known about that since I was a spotty and fundamentally useless youth employed as chief spanner holder and spare pair of hands (cars, repairing of, for the use of) by Pater so I'm surprised to find that it's unknown to others, but the *main* thought that crosses my mind is; "What comparable, elementary and obvious everyday things don't I know about?"
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