Author Topic: robots and cycle lanes  (Read 6348 times)

Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #25 on: 07 October, 2023, 08:24:21 pm »
Historically going back you also have to remember that not much over 100 years ago, before the rise of the motor car, that most roads were not signed, and only the locals used them.

In fact if you go into the lanes to the west of Hitchin you will find many of those lanes still have no signs and you have to know how they connect or be following your GPS.

In France at the end of the 19th century there were no road signs or directions at all. It was Michelin who, having developed excellent tyres, had to find a way for tourists to use their vehicles and wear out their tyres (so that they would need to replace them). This meant drawing maps and guides so that people would know where they might like to go - but there were no signs on the roads so Michelin had to put up signs as well! Perhaps if there was a bit of a commercial incentive nowadays the paths and the signage would be much better (as we find in places like the Loire valley).

Incidentally some Michelin road signs still exist. I used to photograph interesting ones if I had a camera to hand. I don't know if the Michelin guides were aimed more at cyclists at first or at motorists - I don't think Michelin cared either way so long as they sold more tyres! Now did anyone think in the same fashion in early 20th century UK?

I have never managed (admittedly not had a lot of experience trying but more than not at all) to follow ant british cycle route. I always miss a sign somewhere (or perhaps the sign was already missing!)

Pingu

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Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #26 on: 07 October, 2023, 08:33:37 pm »

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #27 on: 07 October, 2023, 09:51:30 pm »
What is Gc? Grande chemin? And why have the letters and the 2 of 20 been removed from both signs, but not the 0?
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #28 on: 07 October, 2023, 10:42:00 pm »
Historically going back you also have to remember that not much over 100 years ago, before the rise of the motor car, that most roads were not signed, and only the locals used them.

In fact if you go into the lanes to the west of Hitchin you will find many of those lanes still have no signs and you have to know how they connect or be following your GPS.

In France at the end of the 19th century there were no road signs or directions at all. It was Michelin who, having developed excellent tyres, had to find a way for tourists to use their vehicles and wear out their tyres (so that they would need to replace them). This meant drawing maps and guides so that people would know where they might like to go - but there were no signs on the roads so Michelin had to put up signs as well! Perhaps if there was a bit of a commercial incentive nowadays the paths and the signage would be much better (as we find in places like the Loire valley).

Incidentally some Michelin road signs still exist. I used to photograph interesting ones if I had a camera to hand. I don't know if the Michelin guides were aimed more at cyclists at first or at motorists - I don't think Michelin cared either way so long as they sold more tyres! Now did anyone think in the same fashion in early 20th century UK?

I have never managed (admittedly not had a lot of experience trying but more than not at all) to follow ant british cycle route. I always miss a sign somewhere (or perhaps the sign was already missing!)

I like to find plaques de cocher.

Mr Larrington

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Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #29 on: 08 October, 2023, 12:41:47 am »
Wikinaccurate claims the first Michelin Guides were aimed at motor-ists, cyclists being too impoverished to want posh grub. OK, I may have made the second part of that sentence up.
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Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #30 on: 20 October, 2023, 08:57:28 am »
Just out of interest, do these delivery robots have a legal right to use cycle paths? After all they are self propelled vehicles, not cycles which would put them on the same footing as a moped or motorcycle using these paths. So do they have a special exemption or did delivery services just started using the robots hoping no one would object?
I am often asked, what does YOAV stand for? It stands for Yoav On A Velo

Kim

  • Timelord
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Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #31 on: 20 October, 2023, 01:10:36 pm »
Just out of interest, do these delivery robots have a legal right to use cycle paths? After all they are self propelled vehicles, not cycles which would put them on the same footing as a moped or motorcycle using these paths. So do they have a special exemption or did delivery services just started using the robots hoping no one would object?

AIUI they're operating as a 'trial', much like the e-scooter hire schemes, where they make up the rules as they go along in negotiation with the local authority.

Otherwise, in BRITISH law, they're surely a motor vehicle by default.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #32 on: 20 October, 2023, 01:16:55 pm »
Presumably, as with e-scooters, the 'trial' will come to an end once the commercial landscape alters. There will be no law change.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #33 on: 20 October, 2023, 02:12:22 pm »
I know the robots can be a liability for blind and wheelchair using pedestrians as the disability communities are pretty against them. Especially when they freeze up and block dropped kerbs or are unexpected obstructions...

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #34 on: 23 October, 2023, 03:46:21 pm »
I know the robots can be a liability for blind and wheelchair using pedestrians as the disability communities are pretty against them. Especially when they freeze up and block dropped kerbs or are unexpected obstructions...

Whilst waiting to get my hair cut on Saturday I was watching the robots on the pavement across the road.  Three of them ended up in a line, blocking the pavement, as they didn't want to go through a puddle.
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barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #35 on: 23 October, 2023, 11:25:04 pm »
Helpful of them... Bit pathetic that they can't get through puddles. Useful to know we can drown the fuckers ;)

Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #36 on: 24 October, 2023, 08:46:30 am »
They need a toddler subroutine. Any young child knows that puddles are for splashing through (regardless of footwear at the time).

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #37 on: 24 October, 2023, 10:32:24 am »
I have to confess that if I saw these robots blocking pavements and dropped kerbs in such situations, it might bring out the imp in me. I'd probably be tempted to pick one up and put it down upside-down. No, I have no idea how much they weigh, but I presume they would bleep like a hired e-scooter when you move it out of the way.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #38 on: 24 October, 2023, 10:45:58 am »
I thought they were secretly piloted by remote workers in low income countries? Perhaps they should hire low income toddlers instead.

Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #39 on: 24 October, 2023, 12:45:36 pm »
They need a toddler subroutine. Any young child knows that puddles are for splashing through (regardless of footwear at the time).

if (path == puddle) {
    if (puddle == muddy) {
        jumpUpAndDown}
    else {splashThrough}}
else {driveOn}

Kim

  • Timelord
    • Fediverse
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #40 on: 24 October, 2023, 12:52:56 pm »
They need a toddler subroutine.

Or a sign saying "Rufford Ford"

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #41 on: 24 October, 2023, 09:36:42 pm »


Now the robots are carrying bombs...

https://m.ai6yr.org/@ai6yr/111291889586336440

J
--
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Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #42 on: 25 October, 2023, 01:10:35 pm »


Now the robots are carrying bombs...

https://m.ai6yr.org/@ai6yr/111291889586336440

J
This could lead to robot civil war: Call the police! Get them to send in the bomb disposal robots!
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #43 on: 25 October, 2023, 04:05:40 pm »


Now the robots are carrying bombs...

https://m.ai6yr.org/@ai6yr/111291889586336440

J
This could lead to robot civil war: Call the police! Get them to send in the bomb disposal robots!
But they are running Vista...
https://youtu.be/Uh64nPT7JWk

Re: robots and cycle lanes
« Reply #44 on: 26 October, 2023, 02:17:27 am »
Where in Stevenage were you trying to get to and from on the cycle ways?

Does the cycle network in Stevenage properly connect to anything?

It studiously avoids going near the town center. It whizzes past the far end of the car park of every supermarket. The connection to the railway station is through a hole in the fence into a dark corner of the car park that may as well have been put there by vandals.

It's bizarre. It's like the cycle network was put in by a member of the planning team that everyone else hated.

It connects directly to Tesco in the town centre, it connects directly to Aldi, it connects directly to Costco, it connects directly to Asda, it connects directly to Sainsbury’s . It connects to within 50m of the other end of the pedestrianised town centre, there’s a connection to within 100m, plus another connection that ends at the start of the pedestrianised zone.  It makes a fairly decent connection  to the station on the other side. It connects you to the hospital.  It connects you to the swimming pool. It connects you to the leisure centre. It connects you to every major park and passes through a few of them. It connects directly to every area of Stevenage built at same time via over 30 miles of segregated cycle ways.

Whilst some bits are nowhere near as good as 50 years ago when built, due the subsequent planners prioritising the car and newer areas like Chells or adjacent Great Ashby (built in 1990s) didn’t expand the cycleways to the new housing. For the most part it remains intact.

It’s pretty damned decent, and seems bizarre you think it doesn’t connect places.

                Compared to Oxford it sounds like paradise
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