Author Topic: Michael Mosley  (Read 2938 times)

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #25 on: 17 June, 2024, 05:45:58 pm »
I've noticed when touring in 40+ temperatures that I'm ok when actively cycling cause of the airflow over the body.  It's when you stop that things get unpleasant - or on one case climbing the bloody steep hill north from Malaga when the tailwind was exactly the same speed and direction as me so I was effectively in still air.
The sound of one pannier flapping

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #26 on: 17 June, 2024, 06:01:35 pm »
Every breath taken if the ambient exceeds body temperature needs to be chilled to body temperature.
Metabolic heat of around 80-100W at rest must be dissipated. Once muscles are used, there is more metabolic heat to dissipate, sometimes several hundred watts.
Evaporative cooling is almost the only way the body can lose heat if not actively chilled by cold immersion or ice.

Thermoregulation can get overwhelmed.
There seem to be several tourists in trouble in Greece right now.
A parasol will not chill the inhaled air of a man on the move to any significant extent..

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #27 on: 17 June, 2024, 06:07:07 pm »
Four more dead due to heat.More missing.

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #28 on: 17 June, 2024, 06:45:35 pm »
Four more dead due to heat.More missing.
Where?

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #29 on: 17 June, 2024, 06:50:39 pm »
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #30 on: 17 June, 2024, 06:54:43 pm »
Every breath taken if the ambient exceeds body temperature needs to be chilled to body temperature.
Metabolic heat of around 80-100W at rest must be dissipated. Once muscles are used, there is more metabolic heat to dissipate, sometimes several hundred watts.
Evaporative cooling is almost the only way the body can lose heat if not actively chilled by cold immersion or ice.

Thermoregulation can get overwhelmed.
There seem to be several tourists in trouble in Greece right now.
A parasol will not chill the inhaled air of a man on the move to any significant extent..

Carrying loads of water isn't just for drinking.

Dampen a shirt, put it back on. Evaporative cooling. Ditto a hat.

The classic leather aussie bush hat is quite cooling (especially the suede finish ones). They get wet from your sweat then cool your head. All of the farm ones had a disgusting ring of salt.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #31 on: 17 June, 2024, 07:07:25 pm »
During the heatwave a few summers ago, my favoured nocturnal cooling technique was to wet a flannel, lie on my back and place the flannel on my belly.

If you have an iced drink, you can lose some heat in hot urine, then wash your hands & leave them to dry.

This would not have been possible for an isolated walker in the wild.

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #32 on: 17 June, 2024, 07:41:33 pm »
Four more dead due to heat.More missing.
Where?
Greece?


Two more Greece and two Cyprus. Rest of those missing are Greece.

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #33 on: 17 June, 2024, 08:36:19 pm »
Every breath taken if the ambient exceeds body temperature needs to be chilled to body temperature.
Metabolic heat of around 80-100W at rest must be dissipated. Once muscles are used, there is more metabolic heat to dissipate, sometimes several hundred watts.
Evaporative cooling is almost the only way the body can lose heat if not actively chilled by cold immersion or ice.

Thermoregulation can get overwhelmed.
There seem to be several tourists in trouble in Greece right now.
A parasol will not chill the inhaled air of a man on the move to any significant extent..

Carrying loads of water isn't just for drinking.

Dampen a shirt, put it back on. Evaporative cooling. Ditto a hat.

The classic leather aussie bush hat is quite cooling (especially the suede finish ones). They get wet from your sweat then cool your head. All of the farm ones had a disgusting ring of salt.

As do mine, Aussie leather one and 30 year old Christie Lightfelt.  When I was doing long runs it was a baseball cap, dipped in a stream or water poured in it before putting it back on.

I was in Bodrum whilst all this was going on, and I can only say it was brutal.  We were definitely hiding from the midday sun, but I still managed to feel the effects of it in the late afternoon/early evening. 

As QG says, we need to learn to moderate our exposures rather than sitting out there as a lobster - the check-in queueueue was full of folks with peeling faces, shoulders and necks on the way home.  I had been wearing at least a short sleeved shirt all week.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #34 on: 18 June, 2024, 11:00:34 am »
My wife is very much an owl and would happily on holiday get up midmorning and then lie in the sun throughout the hottest part of the day.  Even she now has accepted that getting up early and sunbathing for a couple of hours then a siesta before another couple of hours is more enjoyable as temperatures rise everywhere.

Last October we were in Marrakesh and daytime temperatures were in the 30s.  we spent about 4 hours a day inside in buildings designed to stay cool without a lot of energy.  The pool in the middle of the house acted like a very efficient cooling source.

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #35 on: 19 June, 2024, 11:36:26 am »
When I was a very active child in Cyprus I used to love going out in the afternoon sun. Fortunately I seem to have had the right skin type and also had plenty of hair back then.  I was as dark as any native of the island (I was born in Africa).  Eight years after I returned to the UK I had lost some of my immunity and can remember the first summer I got sunburn (slightly, on my forearms).  I have only very rarely got sunburnt as I don't do sunbathing!

Is the sun's heat more intense today than it was in the fifties? 
Sheldon Brown never said leave it to the professionals.

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #36 on: 19 June, 2024, 11:51:50 am »
Yes, in australia. Much stronger UV.

To lesser extent the Ozone layer has thinned over europe as well.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #38 on: 20 June, 2024, 08:20:07 am »
I have no idea what that would feel like.
Hottest I've experienced (outdoors, sustained period) would be in the low 40s.

50C or above sounds like a nightmare, barely survivable.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #39 on: 20 June, 2024, 07:55:48 pm »
Death Valley, in the USA, has its name for a reason, I presume.

Inactive adult humans can be nursed nude at 28C.

It’s a major physiological challenge to keep the body down to 36-7C at higher temperatures, levels of activity or humidity.

Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #40 on: 20 June, 2024, 08:05:16 pm »
Death Valley, in the USA, has its name for a reason, I presume.

Inactive adult humans can be nursed nude at 28C.

It’s a major physiological challenge to keep the body down to 36-7C at higher temperatures, levels of activity or humidity.

Why are the nurses nude?  :o

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Michael Mosley
« Reply #41 on: 20 June, 2024, 08:16:17 pm »
Because its so hot
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens