Author Topic: Woodburning camp stoves  (Read 55548 times)

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #175 on: July 27, 2012, 12:47:26 pm »
the smoke makes a good midge deterrent

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #176 on: July 27, 2012, 01:03:41 pm »
I think "gasification" is a great word. And I wish you lot would stop going on about these stoves. I have two meths stoves already and don't need anymore cooking gear no matter how good it is!

Charlotte

  • Dissolute libertine
  • Here's to ol' D.H. Lawrence...
    • charlottebarnes.co.uk
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #177 on: August 07, 2012, 01:33:35 pm »
Damn.  Bought one  :D

A place in Twickenham (Funky Leisure) had them for sale at £49.95 and I popped down to have a look at one and to see if it would fit into one of my camping pots.  It did, so I bought one.

So here's what you get:







A good fill of twigs:





Some smaller stuff and some paper:



Touch a match to it...





Within a couple of minutes, the woodgas catches:





After about twenty minutes (unless you feed it more fuel), you end up with this:



I did feed it some more and kept it burning for about an hour.  Here's the aftermath:



Pure charcoal  :)



The verdict?  This thing knocks my home made stove into a cocked hat.  Seriously, it's smaller, lighter, cleaner and focusses the heat that much better. 

But wait - there's more...

I was wondering whether there was a way of fitting a Trangia burner into it.  This is the stove with my Tatonka Trangia-pattern burner (same diameter, but stainless rather than brass and has a bigger reservoir).



You *can* just use the upper half of the stove as a pot support and put the burner on the ground like so:



...and the simmer ring works like this:



With a pot on it, you get something like this:



It works well enough - the burner's a little low maybe, but it's not bad.  My only criticism of the stove design is that the fold-out pot supports don't go to the horizontal, so you need a big pot to cover them all for maximum stability.  You *can* use a smaller, bushcraft-style pot, but it won't be as steady.



You might want to put the whole thing on a sturdy base - like this:



You might also consider a windshield if you're on meths:



Pondering the issue of how to raise the meths burner to a slightly higher position, I had an idea.  Don't you just love it when things fit together this well?



(Julian hardly ever uses her granny ring these days, anyway  :D)

Now you can see where the burner (and simmer ring) sit when the top goes on:



There's even enough airflow that I can use this sturdy sheet ally windshield as a pot support, like this:





So there you have it.  A kick-ass, lightweight, top-lit, downdraft gassifying wood stove with added bikey goodness.  A meths burning option for when you don't want to scrub the soot off your pan. 

It all nests together into the first pot in these photos, along with the windshield and the burner.  I'm going to knock up a nice little pair of soot-proof fabric drawstring bags for it all and give it a thorough testing on my first tour with it next week.
Commercial, Editorial and PR Photographer - www.charlottebarnes.co.uk

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #178 on: August 07, 2012, 01:50:36 pm »
Ooh, shiny.

I wonder why the pot supports aren't horizontal?
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Charlotte

  • Dissolute libertine
  • Here's to ol' D.H. Lawrence...
    • charlottebarnes.co.uk
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #179 on: August 07, 2012, 01:53:42 pm »
I'm not sure, but I'm tempted to get hacky on them until they are.  I could probably drill the rivets out and replace with some nice little stainless bolts and some custom-fabricated pot supports...

*wanders off in search of 0.5mm stainless sheet*
Commercial, Editorial and PR Photographer - www.charlottebarnes.co.uk

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #180 on: August 07, 2012, 02:10:39 pm »
Mmm, tempting - I like the alternative fuel concept.  Was wandering myself about getting one and carrying a handful of those solid fuel tablets as a backup, but wasn't sure if they would be too hot.

But it doesn't say it's downdraft - the description fits with what I suspected yours did - burn upwards with an injection of more oxygen near the top.  You might be able to test which is true with some kind of cunning blocking arrangement to force the outside area to ingest air from outside rather than stuff potentially coming down the middle.

Quote
How the Wild Woodgas Stove Works

Wood-gas stoves create conditions where 'primary air' partially combusts wood gas, then inject pre-heated 'secondary air' into the top of the combustion chamber to mix with the remaining smoke, resulting in a very hot, clean burn and quick and easy lighting. A woodgas stove produces less carbon monoxide and particulates than open fires, and even rocket stoves. The images show the hot wood gases meeting the pre-heated air, appearing as jets of yellow flame.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #181 on: August 07, 2012, 02:32:16 pm »
But it doesn't say it's downdraft - the description fits with what I suspected yours did - burn upwards with an injection of more oxygen near the top.  You might be able to test which is true with some kind of cunning blocking arrangement to force the outside area to ingest air from outside rather than stuff potentially coming down the middle.

I agree.  I can't see how the convection of gas between the walls would be stronger than that heading upwards from the primary fire, to the point where it would invert the flow.  I reckon the way to test it would be to sample the gas mixture between the walls and test for combustibility, but I haven't been allowed near gas syringes since that year 9 hydrogen incident...
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Charlotte

  • Dissolute libertine
  • Here's to ol' D.H. Lawrence...
    • charlottebarnes.co.uk
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #182 on: August 07, 2012, 02:33:48 pm »
But it doesn't say it's downdraft

Fair point.
Commercial, Editorial and PR Photographer - www.charlottebarnes.co.uk

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #183 on: August 07, 2012, 02:36:37 pm »
Charlotte beat me!

I used one as the only heat source on a recent trip. I set off with some wood and scavenged enough from the surrounding area. To get it going I used Flamers firelighters www.certainlywood.co.uk. they are easy to light (even with a spark) and burn fast and hot. I took a Light My Fire sparker rod; this inspired E Minor to do all the firelighting while I did something else.

I think that it is not a downdraught stove, rather a secondary combustion job. I got lots of smoke: some of my pieces of wood were too long and burned above the gas flame,therefore giving off sooty smoke. I also used wood that was a bit thin compared with Charlotte's fuel. I guess that the ideal size  is about the same as a man's thumb.

It certainly packs small; stove, tinder, lighting tools and two pans in the same volume as a Trangia.

It worked well for brews and pasta and was acceptable for vegetables. When I get the hang of fuelling it properly, it will work very well for me/us. It is worth considering a light axe and small saw for fuel preparation.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #184 on: August 07, 2012, 08:25:08 pm »
Now there's a lovely little thing!
Getting there...

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #185 on: August 07, 2012, 10:23:09 pm »
I don't camp enough, or cook enough when I do camp to justify getting one of those lovely little stoves but I wants one precious. Particularly as my homemade out of tin cans one is no good at the burning of sticks.

Rather tempted, might have to wait for a sale but even if I just burn stuff in the garden it'd be fun.
Miles cycled 2014 = 3551.5 (Target 7300 :()
Miles cycled 2013 = 6141.4
Miles cycled 2012 = 4038.1

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #186 on: August 22, 2012, 12:17:39 pm »
Just bought one of these, online direct from WildStoves. Not immediately impressed, have to say. Wonder if I might have been sold an original rather than the allegedly more robust Mark II. Could other purchasers help me confirm which variant I have?

Brown box bears no label, unlike Charlotte’s which clearly announces the content as a Wild Woodgas Camp Stove Mark II. Instead has paper label/sash in green, red and brown describing content as Wild Woodgas Campstove with no indication of model or variant. Dark brown on pale brown Instructions leaflet - “Congratulations! You own a Wild Woodgas Campstove” -makes no mention of this being a Mark II. Drawstring bag is black plastic affair:  I’ve seen what looks like a red fabric job on their site and in youtube reviews.
Nowhere on the packaging/labelling does “Mark II” appear, only on the invoice.
What’ve I got?

Damn.  Bought one  :D

A place in Twickenham (Funky Leisure) had them for sale at £49.95 and I popped down to have a look at one and to see if it would fit into one of my camping pots.  It did, so I bought one.

So here's what you get:





Does your instruction leaflet in pic 2 - which I don't have - specify Mark II, Charlotte?

Charlotte

  • Dissolute libertine
  • Here's to ol' D.H. Lawrence...
    • charlottebarnes.co.uk
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #187 on: August 22, 2012, 12:53:34 pm »
Not sure.  Post some pictures and we might be able to tell you...
Commercial, Editorial and PR Photographer - www.charlottebarnes.co.uk

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #188 on: August 22, 2012, 01:01:48 pm »
Regret am unable to post pictures of the white instruction leaflet that accompanied your stove, but which is absent from mine...!
Mark II allegedly stronger. Not sure this would be visually discernible from a photo. Plainly I've received a different package to you - you've the red fabric drawstring bag for starters..


Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #189 on: August 22, 2012, 03:38:15 pm »
But it doesn't say it's downdraft - the description fits with what I suspected yours did - burn upwards with an injection of more oxygen near the top.  You might be able to test which is true with some kind of cunning blocking arrangement to force the outside area to ingest air from outside rather than stuff potentially coming down the middle.

I agree.  I can't see how the convection of gas between the walls would be stronger than that heading upwards from the primary fire, to the point where it would invert the flow.  I reckon the way to test it would be to sample the gas mixture between the walls and test for combustibility, but I haven't been allowed near gas syringes since that year 9 hydrogen incident...
The velocity of the gases from primary combustion cause a venturi effect thereby pulling air in through the secondary jets to feed the secondary combustion.
Welding, fabrication and light engineering available to forum members.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #190 on: August 22, 2012, 08:16:33 pm »
I agree.  I can't see how the convection of gas between the walls would be stronger than that heading upwards from the primary fire, to the point where it would invert the flow.  I reckon the way to test it would be to sample the gas mixture between the walls and test for combustibility, but I haven't been allowed near gas syringes since that year 9 hydrogen incident...
The velocity of the gases from primary combustion cause a venturi effect thereby pulling air in through the secondary jets to feed the secondary combustion.
[/quote]

Yes.  Gas from the primary combustion rises and draws air in through the jets from outside for a secondary burn.

The suggestion was that pyrolysis gas was being drawn *down* from the primary combustion area, mixed with air from outside and then burnt off at the secondary jets.  Nice trick if you can manage it.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #191 on: August 22, 2012, 08:47:15 pm »
Regret am unable to post pictures of the white instruction leaflet that accompanied your stove, but which is absent from mine...!
Mark II allegedly stronger. Not sure this would be visually discernible from a photo. Plainly I've received a different package to you - you've the red fabric drawstring bag for starters..

I believe the mk I and mk II are different in size as only the mk II fits inside the stowaway pot. Not sure if the dimensions for both are online but maybe Charlotte would be kind enough to measure hers to compare with yours?
Miles cycled 2014 = 3551.5 (Target 7300 :()
Miles cycled 2013 = 6141.4
Miles cycled 2012 = 4038.1

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #192 on: August 23, 2012, 11:43:05 pm »
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #193 on: August 29, 2012, 10:05:38 pm »
Just bought one of these, online direct from WildStoves. Not immediately impressed, have to say.
Did have the mark II: later product run.
And having returned it and been refunded can now wax on its shortcomings. The collapsible design is genius and somewhere there's an excellent stove struggling to get out. But I thought the execution left something to be desired. Didn't like the pot support ring, seemed v fragile and brittle, reminded me of the plastic used in 1970's toys. The three pot supports are wafer thin, like knife blades, hinged on tiny copper rivets and tiny spot welded to the rim: can't see them enduring repeated flaming and cooling. Integrating the 'wings' into the mould of the pot support ring - they'd be out of the way with the ring inverted when packed up - and beefing the thing up some might be a solution. Or selling it with a cruciform trivet to sit on top.
I may be out of touch with the cost of stuff these days, but I felt I had £20, at most £25, worth of thing in my hands.
Shame.

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #194 on: September 04, 2012, 09:29:53 pm »
I used my WildStove for 36 nights this summer and I am really happy with it. I used a Trangia type burner with meths for about half the time. I put a few aluminium pie dish jobbies underneath it and a fire shield. Using it with meths was reliable and consistent. Using it with wood was a bit hit and miss, maybe because I'm not a very successful pyromaniac! Sometimes the fire was too smoky when getting going -  other times it was easy to get it going. That it burns from the top down seems so counter intuitive to me, but it surely does. I got into the habit of rubbing a drop of liquid soap on the pot bottoms, and when I remembered to do that washing the soot of was a cinch. I wonder if that would work just a well with ordinary soap?
The trangia burner fits in nicely when folding away the stove and the stove fits inside my pots, saving space compared to using the trangia. So far the hinges on the pot stand have been fine - but I agree that they don't look particularly robust. In the UK meths seems expensive, in Brittany this summer it was about 1Eu90cents a litre, but I was pleased that I could save money using bits of wood just lying around some of the time.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #195 on: September 16, 2012, 08:19:49 pm »
I have just today broken mine through sheer incompetence. I nested it together wrongly when still hot and then broke it trying to get it apart again, by bashing it without sufficient planning thought. I'm gutted. And have just ordered a replacement.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #196 on: June 19, 2013, 08:10:52 pm »
THe pot support hinge finally borked on my wild gas stove. However wildstoves.co.uk have re designed the pot stand here
http://wildstoves.co.uk/stove-spares/wild-woodgas-stove-replacement-pot-support-top/
If you contact them they will offer a good discount as an upgrade/replacement.
I haven't used the new pot support yet though!

Speshact

  • Charlie
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #197 on: June 19, 2013, 11:23:44 pm »
I meant to mention that we've used ours a few times so far this year. Really enjoyed it, successfully brewed tea and coffee and spent evenings gazing into the flames.

Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #198 on: June 20, 2013, 12:16:05 am »
i bought one in may but have not used it in anger yet   mine is the mark II t. i tried in the garden and it seem to work well. :)
the slower you go the more you see

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Woodburning camp stoves
« Reply #199 on: September 04, 2013, 09:30:26 pm »
Turista's in action at Mildenhall.  I have to say the potholder is a weak point of this design:


DSCF1871 by TJ Clarion, on Flickr


DSCF1877 by TJ Clarion, on Flickr


DSCF1889 by TJ Clarion, on Flickr


DSCF1888 by TJ Clarion, on Flickr


DSCF1929 by TJ Clarion, on Flickr

Getting there...