Author Topic: Cutlery lust  (Read 96282 times)

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #450 on: 14 October, 2018, 09:13:22 pm »
When I was in Vienna earlier in the year I was impressed with the several cutlery shops I saw. Haven't seen shops like that in the UK for decades. Sold Swiss Army knives, Opinel, carving knives, hairdressers scissors etc etc etc. Lovely.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #451 on: 31 December, 2018, 03:53:37 pm »
Saw Millets was having a decent sale and got a SAK Waiter to replace the one I've mislaid, and a Leatherman Micra. The latter really is weeny - it will probably mostly live in a bag pocket, but would happily fit on a keyring.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #452 on: 31 December, 2018, 04:10:10 pm »
Not being a fan of sporks, I have a set of stainless steel cutlery for camping that slots together into a holder that looks like it should double as a tin opener. I've never used the tin opener part so don't know how well it works – I'm unlikely to use tins on camp and in any case have a tin opener on my SAK. As cutlery it works every bit as well as anything you have at home, but it is quite heavy. So I was quite pleased to find a set of ultralight "aerospace alloy" aluminium cutlery, with no tin opener but a miniature carabiner to hold it all together. Upon opening the packet, I was slightly less impressed; everything's light and sharp but, of course, ultralight means a little bit flexy. Still an awful lot better than a spork though.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #453 on: 31 December, 2018, 06:01:48 pm »
I made these when I was an apprentice Blacksmith
[IMG-0115.jpg](https://postimg.cc/ZCVT3NNP)

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #454 on: 17 April, 2020, 10:25:57 pm »

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #455 on: 17 April, 2020, 10:56:41 pm »
I have been trying to source some new but traditional pattern butter knives recently. Not an easy task. Someone now thinks that these knives should be tiny. presumably for use with biscuits etc rather than the traditional 8" or so English large flat bladed knife with 'bone' handle for walloping bread rounds. I eventually found a Viners set of full size knives but not the pattern I was seeking, but never mind. Opinel do something similar but with timber handle which has its disadvantages.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #456 on: 18 April, 2020, 11:01:42 am »
Fork facts.

http://www.eatingutensils.net/
Fails to mention my favourite, the scrap of chapati or roti. But we can all be thankful for:
Quote
Spork - Hybrid of spoon and fork.
Knork - Hybrid of knife and fork.
Spife - Hybrid of knife and spoon.
Sporf - Hybrid of knife, fork and spoon.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Pedaldog

  • Aka Pedaldog
  • Contemplating the ashes of experience.
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #457 on: 18 April, 2020, 11:13:04 pm »
Titanium Spork arrived inna post today. Hope it's not too long before I can use it "In Situ".

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #458 on: 04 May, 2020, 12:07:16 pm »
When I was in Vienna earlier in the year I was impressed with the several cutlery shops I saw. Haven't seen shops like that in the UK for decades. Sold Swiss Army knives, Opinel, carving knives, hairdressers scissors etc etc etc. Lovely.

Same in Switzerland last year, we came home with a small set of kitchen knives from Victorinox which are made small enough to fit into our camp kitchen.
Somewhat of a professional tea drinker.


Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #459 on: 24 October, 2020, 08:11:25 pm »
I have spent this afternoon at my very good pal Penelope's house preparing a large vat of curry for her freezer. Although I took my favourite kitchen knife with me, she had a very lovely ceramic one with the make "Ernesto"* engraved on the blade. Pen bought it in Lidl, apparently, a year or two ago, but hasn't used it since a small slip had her in A & E having her finger patched up.

It is beautifully sharp and has a protective sheath around the blade to prevent mishaps.

Does the panel have any recommendations for a similar product?

*I speculated that his surname might have been Vipers.

Edit: I've just realised that this thread is ostensibly camping-related, whereas I want a kitchen knife - which I suppose might come camping with me should I ever go camping again.
Bach without a doubt.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #460 on: 24 October, 2020, 10:46:28 pm »
I fear a knife in a provocative sheath
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #461 on: 07 March, 2021, 11:12:45 pm »
Am proud owner of not one but two titanium sporks bought on eBay for less than £4 each, free postage from China, take six weeks to arrive. Very light. And sporks. Ok for what I want, which is carrying for 500 miles as I walk a pilgrim route in Spain again. Not as good as knife, fork and spoon set but much lighter.
One of the sporks folds, the other doesn't. 
Besides, it wouldn't be audacious if success were guaranteed.

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #462 on: 08 March, 2021, 10:04:33 am »
I bought a Tramontina machete to attack the brambles with - works well enough, but need to spend some time on the edge with a stone. The question is, dare I take it with me in the Carradice when I go bridleway-bashing, or is that an invitation to getting nicked...?

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #463 on: 08 March, 2021, 10:45:51 am »
my understanding of the English law is that it is perfectly ok to carry an enormous cutting blade whereever you go providing that you have a good reason, so taking a machete into Tesco is probably not a good idea but hiding the blade and cycling to a bramble bashing place is perfectly legal.
Besides, it wouldn't be audacious if success were guaranteed.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #464 on: 08 March, 2021, 11:46:45 am »
And the application of English law depends on things like your age, race, where you happen to be and whether you pass the attitude test.

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #465 on: 08 March, 2021, 04:27:51 pm »
I'm aware of the letter of the law, and as a white middle-class middle-aged bloke I'm likely to be given a large slice of the benefit of the doubt, but on the other hand I'd rather not be arguing my legitimate case up before the beak. If I were just going to and from the allotments that would be one thing, but having it with me on a longer rough-stuff ride might be more dubious. I suppose the pragmatic response is either to use something that fits entirely in the saddlebag (folding saw, etc.), or to cover up the handle of the machete so that it's not obviously a BFO blade when poking out the side of the bag...

Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #466 on: 23 March, 2021, 10:16:16 pm »
This young man has no problems carrying a knife, a big kitchen knife in full view. We all know you need a knife to cook meals when camping. We have been stopped going onto a ferry to europe and they wanted to take the knifes , i said you may as well take all the camp cooking gear . They decided it was not worth the hassle. 

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: Cutlery lust
« Reply #467 on: 23 March, 2021, 11:16:39 pm »
On cycling in to the docks at Dover donkey's years ago I was sent into the customs examination shed where a perplexed jobsworth asked me, sitting on a bike festooned with camping kit, tent etc, if I had a knife. I lied and assured him that no I certainly didn't. So he let me cycle on to the ferry. Where I could have stolen one from the restaurant or bought one in the shop. What was I going to do? Hijack the bloody ferry and fly it into an office block?
Border Force isn't worth tuppence. I've been out of Portsmouth several times with a club and we're usually searched, I'm convinced this is because a bike counts as a vehicle but is easier to search than a car. A Labour former home secretary once said the Border Force was not fit for purpose. From the evidence of my own eyes, I'd agree.
Besides, it wouldn't be audacious if success were guaranteed.