Author Topic: 90hrs  (Read 3476 times)

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #25 on: March 13, 2019, 11:25:03 am »
I'm finding these tips really helpful, except I've now started worrying about not being able to find my bike at busy controls ::-)

Another newbie question, given that I don't want to looking for ATM's on the ride, how much cash would people recommend carrying during the ride?

Related but maybe impossible to answer, is it better to buy Euros now or wait until July?

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #26 on: March 13, 2019, 11:42:18 am »
I'm finding these tips really helpful, except I've now started worrying about not being able to find my bike at busy controls ::-)

Another newbie question, given that I don't want to looking for ATM's on the ride, how much cash would people recommend carrying during the ride?

I think I had €200 or so (although I was there for a bit before and after) and I go to Europe semi regularly so having some left over is never a problem for me.

You'll ride through small towns where cash machines are easy to stop at (usually there's one at the post office - La Poste - which is generally easy to spot).

Related but maybe impossible to answer, is it better to buy Euros now or wait until July?

Given the big unknowns the optimal strategy to try and minimise cost is to buy half now and half closer to the time. That way if there is a wild swing you're only half as affected.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

marcusjb

  • Full of bon courage.
    • Occasional wittering
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #27 on: March 13, 2019, 11:59:08 am »
I can't remember how much things cost - but here's my rough memories:

Dorm bed - 3-5 Euros
Shower - 2-3 Euros
Quick grab and go meal - 4-5 Euros
Bigger meal at controls - 10-15 Euros

I also ate at proper restaurants and expect to pay 15-20 Euros for lunch, coffees 2-3 Euros at cafes.  McDonalds similar price to UK.  McFlurry cravings satisfied.

As per greenbank, I think I probably had 200 Euros cash or so on me for the ride.
Right! What's next?

Ooooh. That sounds like a daft idea.  I am in!

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #28 on: March 13, 2019, 12:15:51 pm »

Related but maybe impossible to answer, is it better to buy Euros now or wait until July?

You should have got them on Monday... They will only get more expensive in coming weeks, but may get drastically cheaper, or *REALLY* expensive come about about 1st of April...

When it comes to getting Euros, the cheapest way is usually to mug the first cash point you find on French soil (don't use the one on the ferries, or in the eurostar terminals).

I'd make sure you have a small bag of coins as well as notes, many places will want 50c if you want to pee, and they won't like you trying to pay with a 20 euro note...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #29 on: March 13, 2019, 01:24:18 pm »
Most supermarkets will accept card payment (Maestro)

T42

  • Tea tank
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #30 on: March 13, 2019, 01:26:11 pm »
We're getting away from speed & cushions so I'll add something else a bit OT: remember to pump up your tyres at least once on the way round. Last time I forgot to: I made it round then got pinch flats back & front on a speed bump going into the campsite.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #31 on: March 13, 2019, 02:06:52 pm »
Most supermarkets will accept card payment (Maestro)

Maestro is pretty much NL only, no UK banks issue it. UK banks issue: Visa Debit, or Mastercard Debit. Something many Dutch people seem to not realise, as their Maestro works in most places (except for online payments), but the reverse is not true. This is a problem in Amsterdam where you have an increasing number of shops and bars going card only, they accept Maestro and V-pay only. Effectively making them shops for locals only. This is because Maestro is 2c per transaction at 500 transactions per month, where as at such low volumes, visa and mastercard are 20c+3.4%. Accepting Dutch only cards would be fine if they took cash, but it seems the Dutch are scared of such things... But I digress. Don't rely on a uk issued card working everywhere, carry some cash, hope.

[tangent]Many UK government agencies now don't take credit card, Dutch banks only issuing Maestro, meant I was unable to pay my student loan, until I managed to get a mastercard debit card issue by a German bank... This also court a number of people out in January when it came time to pay UK tax...[/tangent]

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small just Far Away at the back
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #32 on: March 13, 2019, 05:47:12 pm »
The only places I've had issues using my Pre-Paid Mastercard (CAxtonFX) are:
Albert Heijn in Bergen, NH - Just handed over the cash, thankfully wasn't in a CnP only lane
A bus in Langesund, NO - No card worked, probably wanted to work with on card authorization
A market stall in Bergen, NO, Visa Credit card worked



My previous Mastercard Debit cars did have a Maestro logo on the back (because Switch and Solo were integrated into Maestro), but I'm using Visa Debit now.
And according to Wikibolloksica Mastercard Debit is not the same as Maestro, so I guess UK banks have moved, as have many others.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maestro_(debit_card)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debit_Mastercard

What's interesting in the info on Debit Mastercard is it stating that one of the reasons for UK banks switching to that scheme is because of worldwide acceptance...

The differences in the Visa debit card schemes seem to be easier to understand
Visa Debit - can pay more than available funds
Visa Electron - Can't pay more than available funds

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #33 on: March 20, 2019, 02:26:22 pm »

[tangent]Many UK government agencies now don't take credit card, Dutch banks only issuing Maestro, meant I was unable to pay my student loan, until I managed to get a mastercard debit card issue by a German bank... This also court a number of people out in January when it came time to pay UK tax...[/tangent]

J

I dont quite understand this last part, why go to the trouble of using a German bank? - I live in NL and often have to pay a UK(Pounds) bill or transfer funds to family members in the UK, i use revolut now for my UK/Euro transactions. You can hold both currencies on your account and switch them around, easy to move any funds you have from your dutch bank too. The attractive part is that you can move your funds from pounds to euros and vice versa real time using market rates (dont do this in the weekend when markets are shut)... and there is a free version which works fine for me because i dont use it for any major transations.





Regards,

Alan

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #34 on: March 20, 2019, 02:58:16 pm »
Random brain dump from my 2007 and 2011 rides:

Take a tiny cafe lock to stop your bike from being moved when you're in controls. Make sure it's a combi not a key and an easy to remember number.
The number of riders coming up the hill out of Brest towards you will be depressing. Just think how good it will feel when you are one of them waving at the depressed riders yet to make the turn.
The Roc goes on for a while but isn't steep, you're just tired.
Take a few press-seal sandwich bags for carry out food (and for your brevet card if it hoons it down).
Have pocket food in a pocket (or top tube bag as is the fashion at the moment) that you can access whilst riding so you don't have to choose between staying on the group that's working nicely or stopping because you're staving.
Don't miss out on the village patisseries on the way back.
The official photographer will be somewhere in the first 100k ish, so that you still look human for the pictures. Fix up look sharp if you want a picture worth buying.
The Brits shout 'clear', everyone else seems to shout 'free/frei'.
Stick a Union flag sticker on your bike if you want people to talk to you in English, stick a St George's flag on your bike if you want people to ask what country you come from.
Don't feel obliged to eat at controls; some of them are a rip off and some serve shite food.
If eating in a cafe / restaurant / bar along the route, ask what they can cook quickest or what they would recommend; everyone on the route knows what's going on and that you're not there for a leisurely four courses.
There's cheap good espresso coffees at pretty much all controls, take care not to OD on caffeine like I did in 2011 by drinking my normal amount of coke on a ride *and* the coffees.
Don't expect to find an empty bus stop for a nap from night 2 onwards.
Think carefully before going to the medics at controls for something minor; if you look like death they can stop you from continuing if they think it's in your best interests.
As said in a previous post, you get to see everything twice, so don't be afraid you're missing things if you're swift though controls and focussed on riding on the way out. Race out, sit on a bench smoking at every control on the way back.

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #35 on: March 20, 2019, 05:12:13 pm »
I rode straight through to Brest , got there 3 am second night , proper beds only 2 to a room . Great weather last time . I had an 8 hour stop with sleep and refueling etc. Will try again , but a bit older fatter and slower so not sure I will be able to get there so fast

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #36 on: March 20, 2019, 08:16:15 pm »
Random brain dump from my 2007 and 2011 rides:



Is this you at St Martin? If it is, then you forgot the tent at Loudeac. Same clip as on the Scenes at Brest thread.

https://youtu.be/HSCzDorP7vw

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #37 on: March 20, 2019, 09:34:27 pm »
Random brain dump from my 2007 and 2011 rides:



Is this you at St Martin? If it is, then you forgot the tent at Loudeac. Same clip as on the Scenes at Brest thread.

https://youtu.be/HSCzDorP7vw

Bloody hell, didn't think I was ever that young. :thumbsup:

Further tip: don't have fixed sleep stops provided by family / friends who have put themselves out to assist, you feel obliged to waste time even if they don't fit with how your ride is panning out.

Martin

  • Give me bas relief
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Re: 90hrs
« Reply #38 on: March 20, 2019, 10:37:11 pm »
I suppose the best advice I can offer is "don't plan to finish in 90 hrs"  try to finish quicker

I think I went along with an 80hr plan in 2007 (not mine I will add) which went out of the window on the first night. I then revised it to 85hrs so I had a cushion; you may well need it too as you will have no idea what may happen

(in my case ankle failure in both legs at 1000k)

IIRC the timings help you as you have to get to Brest in 40 hours so that's a built in cushion

I planned my two sleep stops at Loudeac; unfortunately so did everyone else...

also no amount of personal support is going to help you turn the pedals, if anything it's an easy ride home if you pack

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #39 on: March 20, 2019, 11:27:08 pm »
I'm finding these tips really helpful, except I've now started worrying about not being able to find my bike at busy controls ::-)


I've add3d a big ball of string to my equipment list. Retracing to my bike should be simple  ;)
   Eddington  81 miles  112 kms

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2019, 11:58:49 pm »
Random brain dump from my 2007 and 2011 rides:



Is this you at St Martin? If it is, then you forgot the tent at Loudeac. Same clip as on the Scenes at Brest thread.

https://youtu.be/HSCzDorP7vw

Bloody hell, didn't think I was ever that young. :thumbsup:

Further tip: don't have fixed sleep stops provided by family / friends who have put themselves out to assist, you feel obliged to waste time even if they don't fit with how your ride is panning out.

The other bloke outside the phone box at the top of Shap in 2003 in this video is Stewart Bond. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPyYn0aRrEo
At PBP that year he was supported by his son, and he realised at one point that this was the closest relationship they'd shared for a long time, so he stopped in order to spend more time with him.

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #41 on: March 21, 2019, 08:42:52 am »
Random brain dump from my 2007 and 2011 rides:



Is this you at St Martin? If it is, then you forgot the tent at Loudeac. Same clip as on the Scenes at Brest thread.

https://youtu.be/HSCzDorP7vw

Bloody hell, didn't think I was ever that young. :thumbsup:

Further tip: don't have fixed sleep stops provided by family / friends who have put themselves out to assist, you feel obliged to waste time even if they don't fit with how your ride is panning out.

Sweet.

BTW the baby photo taped to a stem towards the end of that clip is Rob junior who was under 1 at the time.   Not entirely sure how I got away with that trip.

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #42 on: March 21, 2019, 09:34:57 am »
I'm finding these tips really helpful, except I've now started worrying about not being able to find my bike at busy controls ::-)


I've add3d a big ball of string to my equipment list. Retracing to my bike should be simple  ;)
Like it!

Actually the best suggestion so far was from Ivo - he plans to use a bike with a stand. Genius  :thumbsup:


(I'd add that this is a real problem - although I rarely got to a bike-park before a crowd arrived, I did waste several highly stressful minutes at Villaines-de-BEDLAM hunting for my beloved steed  :facepalm: )
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2019, 09:45:38 am »
I'm finding these tips really helpful, except I've now started worrying about not being able to find my bike at busy controls ::-)


I've add3d a big ball of string to my equipment list. Retracing to my bike should be simple  ;)

We go to the Semaine Federale, where there can be twice the number of bikes at the welcome points, which are generally 25 miles or so apart. I've taken to flying the Duchy of Lancaster pennant from a pole attached to the back of the bike. It's actually quite useful as a marker for other riders, and gives a precise indication of where to form an echelon.

It's also a conversation starter. It has led the Normans and Angevins to theorise that England is actually a Norman/Angevin colony, which is a fair analysis of the Plantaganet period. The people of Western France don't need much encouragement to think of themselves as separate.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angevin_Empire


Re: 90hrs
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2019, 10:29:47 am »
I'm finding these tips really helpful, except I've now started worrying about not being able to find my bike at busy controls ::-)


I've add3d a big ball of string to my equipment list. Retracing to my bike should be simple  ;)

There is an eminent member of this forum who, having started perhaps a little under-prepared one year,  decided at one point that it was important to hide his cycle in a field.  Walking down the road about an hour later he came to and realised what he'd done and had to spend some time searching for the machine.

He did finish in time.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #45 on: March 21, 2019, 01:39:58 pm »
Further tip: don't have fixed sleep stops provided by family / friends who have put themselves out to assist, you feel obliged to waste time even if they don't fit with how your ride is panning out.

... unless said friends or family know they are there for your convenience and have low expectations on anything from you..

TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #46 on: March 21, 2019, 02:04:33 pm »
Further tip: don't have fixed sleep stops provided by family / friends who have put themselves out to assist, you feel obliged to waste time even if they don't fit with how your ride is panning out.

... unless said friends or family know they are there for your convenience and have low expectations on anything from you..

In 2011 Heather got a sat-nav shortly before departure, it failed to load maps. So navigation was a constant problem for her, and by extension, for me. I had to wait for her to arrive at Dreux, when timings were tight for a sub-84 time.

It would have been impossible to carry out my project without her, and the sub-84 bit was a last-minute idea, but being supported is a two-way street.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
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Re: 90hrs
« Reply #47 on: March 21, 2019, 02:14:30 pm »
I can't remember how much things cost - but here's my rough memories:

Dorm bed - 3-5 Euros
Shower - 2-3 Euros
Quick grab and go meal - 4-5 Euros
Bigger meal at controls - 10-15 Euros

I also ate at proper restaurants and expect to pay 15-20 Euros for lunch, coffees 2-3 Euros at cafes.  McDonalds similar price to UK.  McFlurry cravings satisfied.

As per greenbank, I think I probably had 200 Euros cash or so on me for the ride.

That's about what I lived on in 2015.  I'd been on holiday in Ireland a few weeks before, and on the last evening, went to the horse races at a tiny little town in the west.  I had no luck in the first 6 of 7 races, so in the last I put 5Euros each way on horse number 7, race 7, 7 horses.  The Irish, unswayed by superstition, had left this the outsider a 25-1.  The jockey took a wide line to avoid rain-softened ground and it romped home by 13 lengths.  So I ate and slept my way around PBP courtesy of Seamus McCoy Bookmakers, Ballinrobe.   :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Eddington Numbers 124 (imperial), 168 (metric) 517 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)

Re: 90hrs
« Reply #48 on: March 29, 2019, 05:34:17 pm »
Just reading the comments about trouble finding your bike when leaving controls, has given me a thought. The other week, on returning to my bike locked up in the city centre, someone had helpfully added brightly coloured saddle covers advertising a local restaurant to all the bikes in the rack. I didn't think anything of it and shoved it in my bag, but it weighs next to nothing and could easily go in my top tube bag. Might be a useful addition to make my bike stand out in the PBP bike parks.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: 90hrs
« Reply #49 on: March 29, 2019, 05:39:04 pm »
Just reading the comments about trouble finding your bike when leaving controls, has given me a thought. The other week, on returning to my bike locked up in the city centre, someone had helpfully added brightly coloured saddle covers advertising a local restaurant to all the bikes in the rack. I didn't think anything of it and shoved it in my bag, but it weighs next to nothing and could easily go in my top tube bag. Might be a useful addition to make my bike stand out in the PBP bike parks.

May I be the first recumbent rider to suggest that riders of boring, hard-to-see bikes should get a flag?   :D
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...