Author Topic: Confessions of a tool junkie  (Read 18816 times)

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #75 on: May 10, 2019, 10:25:05 am »
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.

Dear oh lor. I think we got that lesson at school when I was 9.
We teach it at Scouts from time to time. I learnt it from my Ladybird Book of Electricity. Or if I didn't, I certainly used said tome to advise my Mum which size fuse was needed in the washing machine.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #76 on: May 10, 2019, 10:39:44 am »
Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #77 on: May 10, 2019, 12:38:58 pm »
I happened to be in Homebase and saw one of these

https://uk.ryobitools.eu/power-tools/drilling-and-screwdriving/drill-press/rdp102l/rdp102l-1/ which is also in the same price bracket

It seemed to be better quality than some of the Titan stuff I've seen, although obv it varies from item to item. I liked the front placed switch, too. I liked the motor was lower and more likely genuine wattage than the Titan.

I also managed not to buy it.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #78 on: May 10, 2019, 01:11:24 pm »
Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!

Advice on fuses changed at some point, with 3A or 13A now covering most options[1].

The important thing is to bear in mind that the job of the plug fuse is simply to protect the cable.  The appliance will, if necessary, have its own protection downstream of the cable entry.


[1] The notable exception being the IEC C13 'kettle lead', which probably merits a 10A fuse in accordance with the connector rating.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #79 on: May 10, 2019, 02:12:21 pm »
Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!

Advice on fuses changed at some point, with 3A or 13A now covering most options[1].

The important thing is to bear in mind that the job of the plug fuse is simply to protect the cable.  The appliance willshould have, if necessary, have its own protection downstream of the cable entry.


[1] The notable exception being the IEC C13 'kettle lead', which probably merits a 10A fuse in accordance with the connector rating.
corrected that for you.  :)
Sorting my life out, one shed at a time.

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #80 on: May 10, 2019, 02:40:06 pm »
<stuff about wiring plugs>

Good plan. I might do that (for the Skills Challenge of course). Getting the right fuse is almost a separate task!

Advice on fuses changed at some point, with 3A or 13A now covering most options[1].

The important thing is to bear in mind that the job of the plug fuse is simply to protect the cable.  The appliance will, if necessary, have its own protection downstream of the cable entry.


[1] The notable exception being the IEC C13 'kettle lead', which probably merits a 10A fuse in accordance with the connector rating.
We combined The Wiring of Plugs* with a Brief Introduction to Ironing. This then morphed into a Short Discussion on Fuses and Fire in The Home when an iron burst into flames.


* This is the cord grip, which in your case you have not got.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #81 on: May 10, 2019, 02:48:57 pm »
I happened to be in Homebase and saw one of these

https://uk.ryobitools.eu/power-tools/drilling-and-screwdriving/drill-press/rdp102l/rdp102l-1/ which is also in the same price bracket

It seemed to be better quality than some of the Titan stuff I've seen, although obv it varies from item to item. I liked the front placed switch, too. I liked the motor was lower and more likely genuine wattage than the Titan.

I also managed not to buy it.

I've seen some negative YouTube crits of that Ryobi - an ungreased spindle bearing on one and one of the sockets that take the raising & lowering handles left unthreaded on another. Also a very flimsy pulley cover on top and a hard-to-reach belt tensioning wheel.  Belt tensioning looks very easy on the Titan.

I'll have a gander at the Titan next time I'm in town.  It's hard to find a shop around here that actually has such items in stock, you mostly get "you order it and we'll get it in".
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #82 on: May 10, 2019, 03:29:25 pm »
A tip for getting pillar drills back perpendicular to the table if you have tilted it: Bend a 'Z' shape, only with right angledish corners about 2-3" sides, from stiff wire. put one end in the chuck, and adjust table height until the other end touches it. turn chuck by hand and fettle until the 'pointer' end just touches the table 360deg.  ;)

Told yiz all the Universe would fall apart without wire coathangers.

Didn't one of the Brontesaurus sisters write a book called Coathanger Abbey?

No, Coathanger Abbey was by Jane Austin-Westminster.
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #83 on: May 10, 2019, 08:45:47 pm »
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.
My father taught me how to wire a plug, probably around the time I was ~ 10 years old, and wires were red black and green. He was in the employ of Hoover at that time.
What he didn't teach me and, to be fair, I only discovered this very recently, is to be very generous with the length of earth wire which you leave inside the plug.
That way, when things have gone awry, and the flex has been ripped away from the plug, the last remaining connection is the earth. :thumbsup:

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #84 on: May 12, 2019, 10:38:14 am »
I'm not sure why being able to wire a plug is having knowledge about electrics.

Wiring a plug is just cutting and stripping wires and doing up a few screws! Anyone can do that just by following a diagram and instructions.

Quote
My boss's daughter has moved into new premises with her boyfriend recently.
He has helped them move.
His words:
They cannot fit a plug.

It's endemic.
How did that happen?

 If somebody doesn't know how to do it, it's probably they've never seen it done (and never had the need to wire a plug, as mentioned), it doesn't mean they don't have the ability to do it once they know how.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #85 on: May 12, 2019, 05:35:08 pm »
What he didn't teach me and, to be fair, I only discovered this very recently, is to be very generous with the length of earth wire which you leave inside the plug.
That way, when things have gone awry, and the flex has been ripped away from the plug, the last remaining connection is the earth. :thumbsup:

This is one of the many safety features of BS1363.  If you strip the wires to the correct length (usually specified on the little bit of cardboard that comes with new plugs) for the channel inside the plug, the earth always gets yanked out last.

I remember my parents having some (presumably non-compliant) plugs where the terminals were all in a neat horizontal row.  Much easier to strip the wires to the right length, and at the time I wondered why all plugs weren't made that way.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

CommuteTooFar

  • Inadequate Randonneur
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #86 on: May 13, 2019, 03:18:00 pm »
Today I unpacked my Evolution Rage Table Saw.  Fiddly slightly awkward process, I dropped two bolts into the machine. Found one when i turned it over. Not sure where the other has gone.

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #87 on: May 13, 2019, 04:04:40 pm »
Health to use it, as me Da would always say.  Wish I still had my old Lurem table saw combo. You'd have a time turning it upside down, it weighed 300 kilos.

Anyway, I'm about to go and unpack the Titan drill press I just splurged on. It seemed to come out of the YT reviews OK.

Missus did the dirty on me just as I was turning into the Brico Depôt car park: "I could use a new pair of running shoes..."  :-\  :facepalm:
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #88 on: May 13, 2019, 04:13:01 pm »
Today I unpacked my Evolution Rage Table Saw.  Fiddly slightly awkward process, I dropped two bolts into the machine. Found one when i turned it over. Not sure where the other has gone.

It's hiding inside the venturi tube.

This piece of wisdom is a hangover from many years ago when I was putting a head back together and bolted the air intakes to the horizontal twin Webber DCOE probably that bit too late at night and, after probably half hour of searching, decided it must have fallen on the floor. As has been by now established, it hadn't and got sucked in a mile or so down the road :(

Even if the saw doesn't have a venturi tube, it will have something functionally similar.

In other news I dug up my Wolfcraft saw/router table over the weekend, it's a bench that allows you to convert a skill saw into a table saw, router into table router. While not perfect it does a job and has - thus far - prevented a splurge on something I have no room for.

ETA something like this. only mine has a router hole and mount in it, too.

andytheflyer

  • Andytheex-flyer.....
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #89 on: May 13, 2019, 06:16:35 pm »
Today I unpacked my Evolution Rage Table Saw.  Fiddly slightly awkward process, I dropped two bolts into the machine. Found one when i turned it over. Not sure where the other has gone.
In other news I dug up my Wolfcraft saw/router table over the weekend, it's a bench that allows you to convert a skill saw into a table saw, router into table router. While not perfect it does a job and has - thus far - prevented a splurge on something I have no room for.

ETA something like this. only mine has a router hole and mount in it, too.
Drool...……………..

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #90 on: May 13, 2019, 06:35:17 pm »
In other news I dug up my Wolfcraft saw/router table over the weekend, it's a bench that allows you to convert a skill saw into a table saw, router into table router. While not perfect it does a job and has - thus far - prevented a splurge on something I have no room for.

ETA something like this. only mine has a router hole and mount in it, too.

I picked up quite a nice Skil circular saw for £10 at a car boot sale the other week with the idea of doing a DIY version of that. Loads of plans and ideas for doing this on Youtube, some very involved that seem to require you already having a table saw to make them which kind of defeats the object ....
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #91 on: May 13, 2019, 08:25:04 pm »
Well, when I bought it, it was sub-£100 (£70 comes to mind?) and it is now £140 - according to the blurb it is compatible with routers, although I can't see the cutouts I have (circle centre with four radial tracks to secure the device) if it does still work for that, it is really worth having.

I got mine to replicate some victorian mouldings, so it paid for itself. It isn't perfect, but it is bloody good, and with the addition of a clamp behind the guides (to avoid any play) it can be a precision bit of kit, and it folds down. One of the nicest aspects is the PROPER on/off control you get with it.

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #92 on: May 13, 2019, 09:02:14 pm »
They cannot fit a plug.
I think I commented on this to a thread involving Kim before. As physics students around 1980, we got a lecture on wiring plugs, because so many post-graduates were electrocuting themselves.

Dear oh lor. I think we got that lesson at school when I was 9.
We teach it at Scouts from time to time. I learnt it from my Ladybird Book of Electricity. Or if I didn't, I certainly used said tome to advise my Mum which size fuse was needed in the washing machine.

Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #93 on: May 13, 2019, 09:09:22 pm »
Nobody does that in Aussie schools. So they take time away from scholastic subjects to teach this sort of thing here? Whatever floats your boat.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #94 on: May 13, 2019, 09:15:12 pm »
Well, when I bought it, it was sub-£100 (£70 comes to mind?) and it is now £140 - according to the blurb it is compatible with routers, although I can't see the cutouts I have (circle centre with four radial tracks to secure the device) if it does still work for that, it is really worth having.

I got mine to replicate some victorian mouldings, so it paid for itself. It isn't perfect, but it is bloody good, and with the addition of a clamp behind the guides (to avoid any play) it can be a precision bit of kit, and it folds down. One of the nicest aspects is the PROPER on/off control you get with it.

I have 2 circular saw tables in my garage - I bought one for £30 then I managed to obtain a better one that was destined for a skip (for free). My table router was £32 and before I had them, I had a Workmate style table with drop-in circular saw and router plates - I think it cost me £5  :demon:

I splashed out £50 on a unused Makita sliding compound mitre saw  - still boxed and complete with folding table (Closed bid auction and nobody else bid on it  ;)), and also £50 on my Drummond metal lathe, which is over 100 years old!  :o
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #95 on: May 13, 2019, 09:19:20 pm »
Nobody does that in Aussie schools. So they take time away from scholastic subjects to teach this sort of thing here? Whatever floats your boat.

Isn't there legal impications about fitting your own plugs in Aus?
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #96 on: May 13, 2019, 09:31:01 pm »
Indeed, Aussies are much less tolerant than Brits regarding dodgy DIY of stuff that can kill the next (unsuspecting) owner.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Tim Hall

  • I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #97 on: May 13, 2019, 09:59:59 pm »
Indeed, Aussies are much less tolerant than Brits regarding dodgy DIY of stuff that can kill the next (unsuspecting) owner.
Sockets in bathrooms are what made me twitch when I was in Sydney.
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #98 on: May 13, 2019, 10:06:41 pm »
They are installed properly and earth leakage devices have been mandatory since 1991. It seemed really odd to me that Brits didn't insist on reliable wiring and that charging of toothbrushes and shavers has to be done outside the bathroom.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Confessions of a tool junkie
« Reply #99 on: May 13, 2019, 10:22:21 pm »
Plug fitting is still taught on most Science sylabusses. CLEAPSS - the school science safety advisors, say that you should bend the earth pin so that it cannot be plugged in, if students are wiring plugs.

I remember a set of those lurking in the physics prep room when I was doing my A-levels.  The dangling end of the cable was properly insulated, too.  Seemed like overkill compared to just turning the power off in the classroom, as they did when I was taught, but never underestimate the power of year 9s armed with stupidity.

My main memory of the domestic electricity part of the syllabus was the teacher (who was, admittedly, a bit rubbish) failing to come up with a convincing reason for ring mains.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...