Author Topic: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.  (Read 3128 times)

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
    • CET Ride Reports and Blogs
Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #100 on: June 06, 2019, 10:26:59 pm »
Milk is great for those who like it and can stomach it. It has a significant mineral content as well as its protein, carbs and fats.

Works for me.  The first time I finished the Kernow & SW I had some stomach problems on the second day (lots of descents in cold air, I think) and I got round on diary (milkshakes, ice creams) as that worked.  The temperature warmed up, max 27C, peaking around the time I had to battle the ultra-hilly section at the end.  I got to the finish fine and then immediately felt really weird.  Ian H was quite concerned and asked if I needed anything.  Instinct told me a packet of salt and vinegar crisps - which restored sanity really rapidly - as I'd not really taken any electrolytes in. (But I still find it easier to consume salts in solid food than in tablet - liquid form. 
Eddington Numbers 124 (imperial), 168 (metric) 517 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)

Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #101 on: June 06, 2019, 10:34:21 pm »
If I have to use a McDs overnight on an X rated ride I will often have a milk shake or McFlurry instead of burger and chips which I can't really stomach later on. McFlurry takes longer to consume but powers me along for a fair period.

I usually don't like garage milkshakes as full of sugar but do like the Tesco thick strawberry milk shake. I ought to try ordinary milk on a ride as it won't be full of sugar.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #102 on: June 07, 2019, 01:15:45 am »
Milk is great for those who like it and can stomach it. It has a significant mineral content as well as its protein, carbs and fats.

Stomach yes, digest, not so much apparently.

I've noticed that Frijj has become less easily digestible (more inclined to slosh about in my stomach for hours, which isn't what you want on an audax) since they replaced much of the sugar with sweetener.  Supermarket 'flavoured milk' is much better, as it seems to consist mostly of milk, sugar, flavouring and colouring.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

  • Miles eaten don't satisfy hunger
  • 3x Brimstone ancien 3x Pendle/Tan Hill DNF
    • CET Ride Reports and Blogs
Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #103 on: June 07, 2019, 05:46:01 am »
Milk is great for those who like it and can stomach it. It has a significant mineral content as well as its protein, carbs and fats.

Stomach yes, digest, not so much apparently.

I've noticed that Frijj has become less easily digestible (more inclined to slosh about in my stomach for hours, which isn't what you want on an audax) since they replaced much of the sugar with sweetener.  Supermarket 'flavoured milk' is much better, as it seems to consist mostly of milk, sugar, flavouring and colouring.


CET Junior doesn't digest aspartame, a common artificial sweetener very well.  For quite some time we avoided "no added sugar" products in the supermarkets - they are just as sweet as the ones they replace but have artificial sweeteners.  Without getting into the pros and cons of such subjects I try to avoid "no added sugar" products on Audax rides on the grounds that they've had a valuable source of calories taken out.  (Just the same as avoiding low salt products).  In fact, my Audax diet would probably be enough to give the food police a heart attack.  :smug: :smug: :smug:
Eddington Numbers 124 (imperial), 168 (metric) 517 (furlongs)  111 (nautical miles)

Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #104 on: June 07, 2019, 08:29:49 am »
... so I drank more because it was obvious I was de-hydrated. But my increased fluid intake just resulted in more frequent pee stops. It was most annoying ! It must've been helping to correct my de-hydrated state, but it didn't feel like it was having any effect.

I guess there's a finite rate at which the body can take in fluid to replenish what's been lost ...
If you were peeing then your body had absorbed it. I'm not a medical professional but I'm sure there is no link from the digestive tract to the bladder.

Indeed.  And when people talk about liquids "passing straight through" (which *is* an occupational hazard of drinking too much volume too quickly) that isn't actually what they mean...

Well yes - there isn't a by-pass in there !

My point is that I was peeing more frequently, it was clear and I was still de-hydrated.  It must've been making a difference, but it didn't feel like it at the time and I still took 24 hours to get back to normal.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #105 on: June 08, 2019, 10:04:21 am »
You couldn't have been dehydrated if you were passing lots of clear urine. The main symptoms of dehydration are reduced urine output with darker colour. You were affected/ stressed by the conditions but not dehydrated.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #106 on: June 08, 2019, 11:25:31 am »
You couldn't have been dehydrated if you were passing lots of clear urine. The main symptoms of dehydration are reduced urine output with darker colour. You were affected/ stressed by the conditions but not dehydrated.

Possibly not completely true, depends on state of your blood. Too much glucose in it will cause urination even if its hydration is less than it should be. The same applies to excessive salt and other chemicals, C2H5OH and any other diuretic. Doing hard cycling, i.e. with high heart rate as in near an individuals max, these are unlikely becasue carbo absorption through the digestive system is limited with most ofthe blood going to the muscles and consumption of glucose by the muscles is high. For lower efforts with innappropriate eating and lower muscle use, a higher glucose level is possible if ones insulin systems are struggling.

With correct training or ample caffeine, low effort cycling can be powered largly by fat. We don't need to consume any extra fat on a short event like an Audax :-) Eating fat also restricts digestive speed but not a problem if riding at lower effort where carbs are not required.  I suspect using water or water with a small amount of salt if sweating hard would be best for hydration.

I find 80miles on just water(1L unless hot) is doable but am ready for the finish. I do this often as training. Sometimes the water has 30-50% fruit juice. The hunger bonk hits a few miles before the finish which is usefull for training for fat burning.
 
Mentally I require 1.5L with 30% fruit juice mix + ~5 muesli bars for a 200Km. If I eat too much I will piss more and need more fluid. If I eat too too much, normally a mental problem for me, I will start getting acid feeling in digestive system. When riding to a start I often end up going at max because I'm late, heart rate is 85% max for 1.5 to 3 hours(30-56 miles), I eat nothing during the ride out, drink only a few mouthfulls but arrive at the start in reasonably good condition. Here I believe I solve the mental "I want to eat syndrome" by worrying about the organiser may have dissappeared from the start by the time I arrive. I will have eaten some limited cereal or pasta and drunk coffee before departure.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #107 on: June 08, 2019, 12:43:59 pm »
The exceptions are just that. For most people and most instances, it is true.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Rehydration in Hot Weather on Audaxes.
« Reply #108 on: June 08, 2019, 02:43:17 pm »
The issue is that water needs to be sufficient in all the body 'compartments' for optimal hydration and these compartments are not equal in any way.

Water is needed in the blood, in the cells of the tissues and between the cells of the tissues.

Having lots of water in the blood might not necessarily mean there is enough in the muscles.

Factors affecting water transfer can be complex.