Author Topic: Tinned potatoes  (Read 5715 times)

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #75 on: July 26, 2019, 08:58:12 pm »
I remember the little bottle of olive oil. Certainly, no one thought of eating it. I don't even think it was single estate cold-pressed extra virgin. My grandparents ate bread and dripping. Minging.

It's seriously no joke that I didn't taste a herb or spice beyond salt and pepper till I was 18. OK, an honourable exception for Knorr Parsley Sauce.

That first chicken curry Pot Noodle literally blew my mind.
!nataS pihsroW

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #76 on: July 26, 2019, 09:01:48 pm »
Dripping on toast (especially the gravy bit at the bottom) with pepper. Yum.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #77 on: July 26, 2019, 09:06:24 pm »
Those days may be about to return.  ::-)
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #78 on: July 26, 2019, 09:14:05 pm »
Those days may be about to return.  ::-)

We weren’t poor, it was just what one did 60 years ago.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #79 on: July 26, 2019, 09:26:59 pm »
I am not referring to poverty, I allude to lack of choice.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #80 on: July 26, 2019, 11:12:29 pm »
I remember the little bottle of olive oil. Certainly, no one thought of eating it. I don't even think it was single estate cold-pressed extra virgin. My grandparents ate bread and dripping. Minging.

It's seriously no joke that I didn't taste a herb or spice beyond salt and pepper till I was 18. OK, an honourable exception for Knorr Parsley Sauce.

That first chicken curry Pot Noodle literally blew my mind.


Sounds about right.  I don't think I had Chinese, Indian or Italian food until I started going on work nights out when I was 20/21 (84/85).   Spaghetti came in tins.   Garlic was dangerous foreign muck.  There was a deep pan on the cooker full of solidified fat for doing chips.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #81 on: July 26, 2019, 11:32:56 pm »
When  I turned up at my first day at art college, in 1974, I’d just turned 20. I had travelled to the other end of the country (Bromley, Kent) from Stoke, and I had nowhere to live. A caring older student took in myself and another northerner until we could find somewhere to stay. That first night she cooked a veggie meal for us and, being the shy well-raised kid that I was, I complemented her on how she had cooked the tomatoes, as I’d never had them cooked like that before. She explained that they were red peppers.

MikeFromLFE

  • Previously known as Millimole
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #82 on: July 27, 2019, 08:10:29 am »
Before Mrs M and I married (we've just passed the 42 year mark) we went out for a meal to the flat of one of her Irish cousins. I gobbled down this exotic, strange concoction, my fiancee seriously offended her relation by refusing to even attempt to eat spag bog.
It was a source of severe embarrassment, and the family rift never healed.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

Too many angry people - breathe & relax.

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #83 on: July 27, 2019, 09:01:26 am »
When  I turned up at my first day at art college, in 1974, I’d just turned 20. I had travelled to the other end of the country (Bromley, Kent) from Stoke, and I had nowhere to live. A caring older student took in myself and another northerner until we could find somewhere to stay. That first night she cooked a veggie meal for us and, being the shy well-raised kid that I was, I complemented her on how she had cooked the tomatoes, as I’d never had them cooked like that before. She explained that they were red peppers.

Sometime in the early ‘50’s my father was sent to the market to buy red peppers for a recipe my mother wanted to try for the first time. He came home with red chillies. A difference they discovered when attempting to eat said meal  :o
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #84 on: July 27, 2019, 09:04:58 am »
Before Mrs M and I married (we've just passed the 42 year mark) we went out for a meal to the flat of one of her Irish cousins. I gobbled down this exotic, strange concoction, my fiancee seriously offended her relation by refusing to even attempt to eat spag bog.
It was a source of severe embarrassment, and the family rift never healed.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

In comparison to many I think I had quite a broad diet growing up in the ‘60’s. We regularly had curry, spag bol, Spanish ommette, and a “Galloping Gourmet” recipe of pork chops with peaches. And we had Chinese takeaways too, though not Indian, that came much later to deepest Sussex.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #85 on: July 28, 2019, 06:27:35 pm »
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese (and people there, even in these marginally enlightened times, will still go to the 'Chinkies') but it wasn't allowed in our house on account it was suspiciously foreign. My parents still won't eat pasta or rice, it's potatoes or potatoes. That said, my mother mostly stopped eating in the early 90s and now survives on cigarettes and the very occasional cheese cob (as they call a roll thereabouts). My father obsessively avoids garlic and is still going on about the time he inadvertently ate some rocket (about fifteen years ago). The way they cook steak is criminal – for a minimum of 30 minutes in the pan. Everything is overcooked to death. Then when they've plated it, they put it back in the oven to 'make sure it's hot' and give it another 30 minutes cooking.

My breakout food was really Pot Noodles and Beanfeast when I arrived at university. Then, of course, the student staples of kebab and extra chilli sauce and, best of all, fish and chips and curry sauce at 3am on a Saturday morning from the chippy in Chinatown. I really don't think I sat down in an actual restaurant until I was into my early twenties.

I'm a bit more culinary cultured these days but I confess, having eaten at a fair number of Michelin starred and similar places, but I'm happiest with a crisp sandwich.
!nataS pihsroW

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #86 on: July 29, 2019, 11:39:34 am »
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese
Glanced at this, read it as "Chelsea". We had Chelsea buns, they were pretty exotic. No one talked about Chelsea boots though.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #87 on: July 29, 2019, 08:13:33 pm »
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese
Glanced at this, read it as "Chelsea". We had Chelsea buns, they were pretty exotic. No one talked about Chelsea boots though.
Chelsea smile?

caerau

  • SR x 3 - PBP fail but 1090 km - hey - not too bad
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #88 on: July 29, 2019, 09:08:47 pm »
I think the only ethnic food we had growing up in the eighties was Chinese (and people there, even in these marginally enlightened times, will still go to the 'Chinkies') but it wasn't allowed in our house on account it was suspiciously foreign. My parents still won't eat pasta or rice, it's potatoes or potatoes. That said, my mother mostly stopped eating in the early 90s and now survives on cigarettes and the very occasional cheese cob (as they call a roll thereabouts). My father obsessively avoids garlic and is still going on about the time he inadvertently ate some rocket (about fifteen years ago). The way they cook steak is criminal – for a minimum of 30 minutes in the pan. Everything is overcooked to death. Then when they've plated it, they put it back in the oven to 'make sure it's hot' and give it another 30 minutes cooking.

My breakout food was really Pot Noodles and Beanfeast when I arrived at university. Then, of course, the student staples of kebab and extra chilli sauce and, best of all, fish and chips and curry sauce at 3am on a Saturday morning from the chippy in Chinatown. I really don't think I sat down in an actual restaurant until I was into my early twenties.

I'm a bit more culinary cultured these days but I confess, having eaten at a fair number of Michelin starred and similar places, but I'm happiest with a crisp sandwich.


Sounds like my brother-in-law and he's quite young (well about 40). My sister is nearly as bad - though her food fussiness is mostly attention seeking as far as I can tell. And it's not like he grew up in a deprived or working class family - his dad owns a palatial pad in the countryside near Luton Dunstable and his two sisters have about three thoroughbred horses each.  He'll do pizza but that's about as exotic as it gets.  What makes me laugh is that he 'can't stand foreign muck' - 'what's wrong with English food' - and spends as much time as he possibly can on holiday abroad - usually somewhere like Mexico. Bet he's pleased about the all inclusive thing  ::-)
It's a reverse Elvis thing.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #89 on: July 30, 2019, 10:15:57 am »
I confess I've never understood 'all-inclusive' holidays. Why?
!nataS pihsroW

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #90 on: July 30, 2019, 10:51:00 am »
I bought some of that, it isn’t cheap, and was underwhelmed, it was quite greasy. Perhaps I should try again, in the interests of science of course.

Greasy, it's cassoulet of coarse it's greasy !

Okay, I shall try again and report back.

Continuing the off-topic theme, I tried Ham's recommendation for preparing cassoulet and accompanied it with a red, hopefully pcolbeck considers it sufficiently robust.  The combination was excellent but TCMR still isn't convinced:






Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #91 on: July 30, 2019, 11:34:17 am »
 :thumbsup:

Excellent attempt, lost a point or two not allowing it to brown, but frankly that is always a inherent issue of internal tension of opposing forces, and improves the cleanability of the pan. Some crispy bits are in evidence on the sides, so a good compromise.

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #92 on: July 30, 2019, 12:50:13 pm »
I didn’t allow it to brown as I was so anxious to eat it!

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #93 on: July 30, 2019, 12:55:53 pm »
I didn’t allow it to brown as I was so anxious to eat it!

...internal tension of opposing forces....

'sactly ;)

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #94 on: July 30, 2019, 12:56:48 pm »
Dont tell the French you put cheese on the top of cassoulet, there will be an international incident !
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #95 on: July 30, 2019, 01:00:32 pm »
Actually, I'm certain that method of serving tinned cassoulet was one I learned in France.

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #96 on: July 30, 2019, 01:12:43 pm »
Actually, I'm certain that method of serving tinned cassoulet was one I learned in France.

Perhaps there is a special dispensation for tinned cassoulet. It does sound like a good idea.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #97 on: July 30, 2019, 03:35:11 pm »
It was chuffin’ lovely.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #98 on: July 30, 2019, 06:06:44 pm »
Do not read if hungry.

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If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Tinned potatoes
« Reply #99 on: July 30, 2019, 10:21:40 pm »
Macedoine salad, in France in the 80s.

Vomit.