Author Topic: Moulton identification to I bought a moulton  (Read 1174 times)

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Moulton identification to I bought a moulton
« on: September 26, 2019, 08:25:17 pm »
How do I identify a moulton, I know it is a pashley built 531 any other identifiers?

Look at one that came up on fb it is a 16 speed 531 tube full suspended bike, but not splitable.

Anything I should be looking at?

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2019, 08:28:40 pm »
Probably an APB variant like the FX8. The exact model doesn’t particularly matter since most of the time it was the same frame with different components.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Gattopardo

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  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2019, 06:23:54 pm »
Am now a moulton ATB owner..

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2019, 06:37:04 pm »
Really, an ATB? There weren’t that many of them made and several of those were converted to tandems.

I’m sure you’ll enjoy riding it. I prefer a fair amount of fork damping for out of the saddle riding but others prefer less, for the magic carpet effect.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

DaT

Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2019, 07:26:22 pm »
Really, an ATB? There weren’t that many of them made and several of those were converted to tandems.

I’m sure you’ll enjoy riding it. I prefer a fair amount of fork damping for out of the saddle riding but others prefer less, for the magic carpet effect.
The race spring does wonders.

Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2019, 07:34:08 pm »
Welcome to the ATB club! Bought mine in 1989, and six years ago had a (removeable) tandem insert made by Doug Pinkerton, and a Rohloff hub gear fitted. Three years ago had an ARCC electric assist added.

It's the most rugged Moulton spaceframe model and takes the largest section tyres, it's my main bike in solo form for off-road riding.

Alex Moulton himself told me only about 100 were made, before the jigs went to Pashley to make the APB, and subsequently the TSR.

DaT

Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2019, 07:35:28 pm »
It does have a very high BB though. Guess it's good for off road.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2019, 07:38:17 pm »
The ATB is separable with the lower frame link (or whatever it is called) detaching at both ends.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2019, 07:55:02 pm »
Sorry brain fart APB not ATB.  This is a pashley built one.

It's this one:


My confusion as All Terrain Bike and All Purpose Bike. 

EDITed as I got it mixed up again.

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2019, 08:17:33 pm »
Good choice, the APB allows lots of options to suit your preferences e.g. narrow or wide tyres. Looks like a separable frame.

Many folk find that a standard bidon rubs the inside of their legs. I use an aero bidon for clearance.

Keep an eye on your brakes. That combination of brake levers and V-brakes is sensitive to pad wear.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

DaT

Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2019, 09:03:38 pm »
Not seen a brake booster in the rear before. Is that a stock part or just painted to match?

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2019, 09:25:44 pm »
Not seen a brake booster in the rear before. Is that a stock part or just painted to match?

No idea, I thought that is how the bike came as it is a one owner bike and the booster is the same colour as the bike.
Good choice, the APB allows lots of options to suit your preferences e.g. narrow or wide tyres. Looks like a separable frame.

Many folk find that a standard bidon rubs the inside of their legs. I use an aero bidon for clearance.

Keep an eye on your brakes. That combination of brake levers and V-brakes is sensitive to pad wear.

It is a separable frame, so far no issues with leg rub but not ridden the bike far.

Brake wise I should replace the pads with some koolstop salmons.  Minimise rim wear.

Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2019, 10:05:36 pm »
Looks nice. What tyres is it should with?
If you don’t make time for exercise now, sooner or later you’ll need to make time for ill health.

Re: Moulton identification to I bought a moulton
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2019, 01:23:07 pm »
It's a different suspension design to the TSR (its successor), I see.  Not a unified rear triangle. 
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

DaT

Re: Moulton identification to I bought a moulton
« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2019, 03:03:03 pm »
It's a different suspension design to the TSR (its successor), I see.  Not a unified rear triangle.
At least it doesn't have the self imploding offset pivot the TSR does.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: Moulton identification to I bought a moulton
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2019, 05:13:26 pm »
It's a different suspension design to the TSR (its successor), I see.  Not a unified rear triangle.
At least it doesn't have the self imploding offset pivot the TSR does.

Oh what is that.

DaT

Re: Moulton identification to I bought a moulton
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2019, 05:25:59 pm »
The bushing isn't big enough for the offset load so it loosens itself and if not checked deforms the hole and you end up with play. They fixed it on the SST but still sell the faulty design on the TSR.

I love Moulton's but the bikes aren't good quality.

APB suspension is too low, can lead to seat tube collapsing.
Series 1 rear forks not being strong enough.
Early series 1 front forks where not brazed correctly. It is common for the steerer to detach from the forks while riding where the brass hasn't fully flowed.
Paint on new models come of if you sneeze near them.
Moulton TSRs didn't have bump stops large enough at some point (don't know years that where effected), this meant that the forks banged into the leading link plates damaging the forks. This happened to me and Moulton refused to warranty them until I threatened legal action. IMO the damage that happened to my forks and them knowing it was a design fault that could lead to sudden failuer should result in complete recall and replacement.
Stainless steel New series rusting through.
£500 stems that go rusty in a year
Faulty rear flexitor on New Series that was leant to Bicycle Quarterly and ended up with a bad review. Moulton only fixed on proviso that the owner wouldn't lend out for review again...
Rear suspension on pivot on TSR is a faulty design. Is fixed on the SST still selling the TSR.
Early AM fork where too weak so they changed the design so there wasn't any taper.
Bridgestone Moulton rear forks can break at the pivot. I guess this is because the aluminium can't take the flex.

Almost every bike they have made has issues.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Re: Moulton identification
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2019, 03:29:22 pm »
Looks nice. What tyres is it should with?

The front is a haro hpt tyre, suspect an older one as it runs at 60psi not 100psi of the current ones, and the rear is a vredestein s.licks tyre.  Believe that the rear is original and have a spare haro tyre and 3 inner tubes.