Author Topic: picking bits for a new bike  (Read 1401 times)

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2019, 06:25:14 pm »
I’ve had both STIs and bar ends break on me (though the bar ends were easier to bodge for a bit). My biggest complaint was that the STI shifting was uncomfortable, while bar ends felt easy to push. Things may have improved, so I’ll give some a test ride. (At a shop I would buy from if I like the bike.)

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2019, 06:26:40 pm »
The problem isn't STIs, it's drop handlebars.  STIs are merely a symptom.   :P

:D
I’ve got a Brooks bum and drop bar arms.

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2019, 10:00:51 pm »
I bought a Cube Nuroad Race gravel bike, and recommend it. Good points(AFAIK) hydraulic brakes, Shimano 11 speed R 7000 series gears. Aluminum frame takes up to 40mm tyres. Eyelets for mudguards and four point rack. Bombproof build. Cost. I negotiated a discount£1180. Very nice to ride. A good bike for its design brief ie covering a lot of bases fairly well. As I'm from North Herts, the 50:34_11:32 gear ratios are fine. The "latest2020" model his available with a 46:30 chainring. A better bet for hillier areas. Hope this helps.

vorsprung

  • Opposites Attract
    • Audaxing
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2019, 09:55:39 am »
You should spec your bike to be nice to ride rather than worrying about mythical failure modes all the time.  Apart from the shifting awesomeness, most drop bars are also designed to mate to STI levers these days, so it's easiest to get a comfortable hand position.  Go for them, they're the best  :)

So apart from my shite Campag 2007 Centaur shifters which broke in a couple of years, other STI breakages have been a 10 speed LH 105 which broke twice, one time during LEL and a 2nd hand Ultegra which I assume just wore out after a long life of abuse

I do keep spares in the box in the garage deliberately because there will be failures of this sort in the future

But that's no reason to not use STI.  I like the shape of them and they make the layout of what you've got to control the bike neater.  I also have a couple of bikes with bar-end levers and brake only levers.  It's all good and I see STI vs. bar end as diversity
Audaxing Blog follow @vorsprungbike on

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2019, 10:27:15 am »
For anyone losing sleep over the possibility of a STI lever failure while out in the wilderness, or even half way round any ride you want to complete - Carry a friction lever with a cable and you can sleep easy.  It's easier to fit to a frame with bosses, otherwise you need a band on version and you may have to customise that if it's an OS tube, either way it probably takes less time to fit and adjust than it does to fix a puncture.

vorsprung

  • Opposites Attract
    • Audaxing
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #30 on: October 25, 2019, 10:36:37 am »
The problem isn't STIs, it's drop handlebars.  STIs are merely a symptom.   :P
And lo, it came to pass that drop handlebars conquer'd the earth.   All velocipedes everywhere sagged at their bar ends.  And this was good
(Book of Sheldon, Ch2 v12)

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Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #31 on: October 25, 2019, 11:37:05 am »
^^Brucey doesn't like STIs because he's a mechanic …..

Mechanics earn their living by doing this kind of thing. IME they are usually so busy trying to make ends meet that they don't have time to drink cups of tea or post here come to that.  I spend quite a lot of my time messing about with bikes -often other people's- but I don't earn a living at it.

This is really concerning.  You don't get paid for this?  :o  Someone is taking you for a ride, you should seek legal and financial advice immediately

Quote
Punctures of any kind and tyre rips that need a boot/tube are 'mythical failure modes' too, until they happen. Honestly I think so many people ride in or near suburbs, near railways or with the (wifey-driven) sag wagon only a phone call away, that they forget the rest of the world isn't like that. I have had all kinds of things happen in odd places and 'having stuff that you can fix' is quite a high priority -certainly higher than any 'marginal gains' crap-    if you ride (or live in) such places.

I'm fairly sure Dan isn't planning to ride to Antarctica any the soon?  For anywhere week else, most bike tourists are ludicrously overspecced - including you by the sounds of it.

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #32 on: October 25, 2019, 11:52:11 am »

I'm fairly sure Dan isn't planning to ride to Antarctica any the soon?

True. England for now, Scotland soon, Europe I hope. Mostly on my own.
If I get steel it isn’t because I can get it welded in some far flung place. But if one approach is more easily fixed (for a dangerous failure mode) than another then that’s an advantage when I weigh them up - not the only factor, but in there.

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2019, 12:41:54 pm »
Drop bars and STIs?  I can count on less than one hand the number of times in the last 2 years I've used the drops.

My next bike will be specced with flat bars with bar-ends and a rohloff
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2019, 01:16:53 pm »
I'm fairly sure Dan isn't planning to ride to Antarctica any the soon?

You definitely don't want STIs for Antarctica.  They'd look silly on the USS bars.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2019, 08:54:47 pm »
Drop bars and STIs?  I can count on less than one hand the number of times in the last 2 years I've used the drops.

My next bike will be specced with flat bars with bar-ends and a rohloff

I thought you were going to suggest flat bars with bar end shifters for a moment :D

The inbred I’m selling is partly the product of me trying that. Still for sale if you’re looking for n+1 ... not a rohloff but easy enough to convert ;)

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2019, 11:34:33 pm »
.................

Frame choice, I think these would all work (give or take finding my size - standover 785mm max, effective top tube 560mm give or take):
Alpkit Sonder Camio Al

Not sure there's any available, they were discounting them last month, which made me wonder if there's a new model on the way.
If it's still on the shortlist the V3 Sonder Camino is now available as a bike and I understand it'll be available as a frameset shortly. I don't know what the differences to the V2 are, but Alpkit are helpful enough if you ring or email and ask.  They also do hire bikes if you wanted to try before buying, the hire cost is refunded if you buy.

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #37 on: October 26, 2019, 12:15:52 am »
If it's still on the shortlist the V3 Sonder Camino is now available as a bike and I understand it'll be available as a frameset shortly. I don't know what the differences to the V2 are, but Alpkit are helpful enough if you ring or email and ask.  They also do hire bikes if you wanted to try before buying, the hire cost is refunded if you buy.
Looks like the V3 is thru axles front and rear, flat mount disc brakes, and a bit more tyre clearance. And more mounts for racks and bottle cages? And a nice mint green colour.
The GRX 1x11 build looks good (I'm not convinced about SRAM).

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2019, 08:06:35 am »
Drop bars and STIs?  I can count on less than one hand the number of times in the last 2 years I've used the drops.

My next bike will be specced with flat bars with bar-ends and a rohloff

I thought you were going to suggest flat bars with bar end shifters for a moment :D

The inbred I’m selling is partly the product of me trying that. Still for sale if you’re looking for n+1 ... not a rohloff but easy enough to convert ;)

See the Folders thread, Airnimal are just up the road from me and I fancy one of those with 26" wheels to bung in the car when I'm doing UK work. All depends of course on payout from my SMIDSY last year. Current road bike would then be given over to turbo duties.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Re: picking bits for a new bike
« Reply #39 on: November 10, 2019, 10:51:58 am »
A quick update, as you were all so helpful with suggestions above...

I've had a ride round the bike shop carpark on a Tripster AT, with SRAM gears. Very nice. The shifters felt comfortable to use, once i got the idea of pushing further for the other direction. But, I really don't think that 1* gears work for the range of uses I'm after. I'd end up compromised on either "quicker" road rides or rough hills, or both.

I had a go on current Shimano Tiagra shifters in a shop. I still don't like the ergonomics of pushing the brake lever over - it just doesn't suit my hands as well as the alternatives.

I also had a go on some electronic shifters at the Rouler Classic. They make a lot of sense for ergonomics, and the SRAM ones I tried had batteries that could realistically be carried as a spare. But they're deeply spendy so really not an option yet!

I think that puts me back into cable discs. Digging about on the forum, I spotted some positive comments about the Juin Tech brakes, which are cable operated by hydraulic in the brake - and sound fairly easy to adjust. So I've added them to the shortlist.

I had a go at pricing up the bits for building based on the tripster, XT gears and moderate shiny other bits. It came to a little more than I want to spend. Which makes the next thing good news :)

And, today I see that the new version Sonder is available as a frame. So I might pop them an email about chainlines and whether they're interested in a non-standard build.