Author Topic: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike  (Read 696 times)

Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« on: November 11, 2019, 09:25:55 pm »
Not sure if this is page appropriate but my brother has just announced he's getting married in Italy next Summer (end of August) and I am considering challenging myself to not fly and travel there and back with minimal carbon footprint via bike and train.
I need to get to just outside Rimini near San Marino and also thankfully close enough to Cesena birthplace of Marco Pantani and home to the museum in his memory which I shall be making a pilgrimage to.
Travelling solo and not sure whether to bunk/hostel/camp then buy some wedding outfit when I arrive.
Anyone got any links to any trans-European cycle route planner sites etc or any tips on train-bike trips of this sort
Yes I know it's a long way but I am never shy of a challenge and always have the trains to pick up the slack. Plus my brother is the one who should be more scared!
Was thinking about Mcr - Dover - then Belgium - Luxembourg - Germany - Switzerland - Italy
NB Plus if anyone is stupid enough to want to join me I am sure I can wangle you an invite to the wedding.
Grazie mille in advance Peeps

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2019, 09:54:25 pm »
Start at https://www.seat61.com/
There is a bike on train page that is pretty comprehensive.

It shouldn’t be too hard to get there and back (trivial with a Brompton).
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2019, 11:02:12 pm »
What’s your time limit and what’s your intended ratio of train to bike? Same route both ways?

If you want to make your channel crossing low carbon you can use the Eurotunnel bike service*:

https://www.eurotunnel.com/uk/travelling-with-us/vehicles/bicycles/

(* they’ll no doubt collect you in a diesel van)

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2019, 11:02:52 pm »
If you re keen to ride all the way, how about;

Trans-Pennine Manchester to Hull

Overnight ferry to Rotterdam

Eurovelo route EV15 Rotterdam to Basel

EV5 basel to Piacenza

EV8 Piacenza to Mantua

EV7 Mantua to Bologna

Then find a route from Bologna.

Littlewheelsandbig's suggestions sre good. If you want to take a full size bike by train, look up  rinko.

The main problem with train travel is the luggage size limit on Eurostar (maximum 85cm...), but it looks like that shouldn't affect you.

Unfortunately, I haven't done this route; I looked it up with the idea of riding to see my sister who lives in Emilia-Romagna.

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2019, 11:23:54 pm »
Eurostar now allow bikes on the main routes. ie London to Paris/Brussels/Amsterdam. Either a complete bike, or boxed. Though limited spaces on each train, so have to book in advance.
https://www.eurostar.com/uk-en/travel-info/travel-planning/luggage/bikes

Could be worth checking coaches as well. Flixbus have routes across Europe, some with bike racks.

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2019, 11:34:13 pm »
The Deutsch Bahn website can give you a decent idea of the trains even though you have no need to go near Germany.

Trains if you set off at 0610 tomorrow:
Picadilly -> Euston
St Pancras -> PAris Nord - With Eurostar Ball aches
Gare de Lyon -> Torino Porta Susa - TGV probably not possible to carry a bike
Torino -> Parma
Parma -> Bolonga
Bolonga -> Rimini

The Bike carriage possible option only reallt works in germany, but they will tell you who operates each train so you can mash your head off the website of the companies.

You can also tell it what trains you don't want to use so can turn off HS by deselecting ICE..
But Eurostar is an HS Service, SouthEastern HS isn't.

You can also cover most TGV routes on a combination of TER, IC, ICN and EuroCity classed trains which makes bike carriage possible; around about this point it's worthwhile looking at InterRail passes...
A global pass lets you travel to and from port (international rail, sea or air) in country of residence; which is pretty handy!

Code: [Select]
Calais Ville dep 13:35 TER42615 Train Express Regional Direction: Boulogne Ville
2nd class only
Operator: SNCF
Boulogne Ville arr 14:11


Boulogne Ville dep 14:36 TER 2026 Train Express Regional Direction: Paris Nord
2nd class only
Operator: SNCF
Paris Nord arr 17:29


Paris Gare de Lyon dep 19:15 EN 201 EuroNight Direction: Venezia Santa Lucia
Sleeper and couchette train , Global price , Couchettes , Bordrestaurant
Operator: Thello
Milano Centrale arr 06:00

Milano Centrale dep 06:50 IC 583 Intercity Direction: Napoli Centrale
Global price , space for wheelchairs
Operator: Trenitalia
Bologna Centrale arr 09:14


Bologna Centrale dep 09:32 R 2891 Regionalzug Direction: Rimini
Number of bicycles conveyed limited , 2nd class only
Operator: Trenitalia
Rimini arr 11:05


quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2019, 12:49:06 am »

Use the bahn.de website or their app, and select "bike carriage required" and you can plan routes with relative ease.

The big issue you're gonna have is the alps. If you're like me and have an aversion to climbing, then following the Rhine as far as Basel, then taking a train to Milan and continuing from there is worth considering.

Every summer for the last 7 years a bunch of neural networks have been trained to find the best route across the alps (within certain constraints), so it may be worth looking at what routes TCR riders have tried...

I took a combination of trains, cycling, a bus, and hitchiking to get back from Bulgaria this summer, if you have specific questions, gimme a shout.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2019, 11:00:45 am »
If you want an amazing train journey through the alps, do this:
https://www.seat61.com/BerninaExpress.htm
the only problem being that I have no idea if you can take a bike on that train. If you can, then I'd thoroughly recommend it. The scenery and experience was amazing. We took the advice from the Seat61 website.

We went to Arezzo in Tuscany using that route - Eurostar to Paris, on to Zurich, night in Zurich. Then Zurich - Chur - Tirano - Milan and on to Tuscany. As I said, no bikes.

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2019, 01:02:02 pm »
There's this route, which we rode in 2017

https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=105227.0

Seat 61 has rumours the night sleeper to Munich will start from Brussels in the new year, one train per week so you may not have to faff around through Holland getting to Dusseldorf like we did, although it was part of the adventure so I'm happy we did that part.

I was happier putting the bikes on the night sleeper, although it is more expensive (reclining seats though, don't cost anything like a compartment) as daytime travel on trains which allow bikes seems to involve an awful lot of changing trains.

ETA the Munich/Innsbruck night sleeper is confirmed on Seat 61 as having two trains per week starting in Brussels
Duct tape is magic and should be worshipped

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2019, 01:34:57 pm »
If you want an amazing train journey through the alps, do this:
https://www.seat61.com/BerninaExpress.htm
the only problem being that I have no idea if you can take a bike on that train. If you can, then I'd thoroughly recommend it. The scenery and experience was amazing. We took the advice from the Seat61 website.

We went to Arezzo in Tuscany using that route - Eurostar to Paris, on to Zurich, night in Zurich. Then Zurich - Chur - Tirano - Milan and on to Tuscany. As I said, no bikes.

I don't remember seeing any bike carriage on the MGB or RHB lines but the websites indicates there is
https://www.rhb.ch/en/service-souvenirs/rail-bike
https://www.matterhorngotthardbahn.ch/en/summer/offers/bike-rail/

Edit: I'm talking pish actually, there was a load of riders got on one of the trains at I think, Oberalp having ridden a sportive.

I did opt to go straight for the old carriage on the back with the pull down windows and the window onto the track for a bog...
There's limited advantage to paying for the tourist train over the normal service trains.

The Steam Railway over the Furka Pass is brilliant too.

The InterRail and SwissPass deals and validity differ through out Switzerland; the Swiss pass was particularly good as it got me a hefty discount and circular route from Interlaken to JungfrauJoch, up via Grindelwald and back by Luterbraunen IIRC. S

yorkie

  • On top of the Galibier
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2019, 01:39:10 pm »
If you want an amazing train journey through the alps, do this:
https://www.seat61.com/BerninaExpress.htm
the only problem being that I have no idea if you can take a bike on that train. If you can, then I'd thoroughly recommend it. The scenery and experience was amazing. We took the advice from the Seat61 website.

We went to Arezzo in Tuscany using that route - Eurostar to Paris, on to Zurich, night in Zurich. Then Zurich - Chur - Tirano - Milan and on to Tuscany. As I said, no bikes.

A quick scan through the Rhätische Bahn timetables on their website
 https://www.rhb.ch/en/service-souvenirs/timetable/printed-timetables

 informs me that the bad news is that the Bernina Express doesn't take bikes. The good news is that there is a perfectly adequate hourly train service along the same route that does take bikes and is cheaper than the Bernina Express. The only downside is that there's 2 changes between Chur and Tirano, although the first at Samedan is cross platform and the second at Pontresina is more than long enough. (Plus this is Switzerland with guaranteed connections, etc...)

There's also an hourly service from Zürich Hbf to Chur, most of which take bikes (the exceptions are in the peak) and an hourly service on from Tirano to Milano Centrale.

Another alternative is the InterRegio service from Zürich Hbf to Milano Centrale, which goes the scenic route over the Gotthard Pass, unlike the InterCity/EuroCity service which goes through the new base tunnel.

Edit: X-post with FE above.
Born to ride my bike, forced to work! ;)

British Cycling Regional Track Commissaire
British Cycling Regional Circuit Commissaire

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2019, 02:00:03 pm »
If you have a decent connection time at Chur I'd recommend a ride up to Arosa and back.
When I was there I managed to time it in coincidence with the hillclimb, which despite checking I missed was on so all I managed to see of the hillclimb was a Blower Bently going up the hill from the train and a couple of Porsches arriving at the top between trains...
the natural scenery and railway engineering on the line is stunning; as is the  Albula line (Thusis - St Moritz)
Arosa and St Moritz on the other hand are clearly winter holiday tourist traps.

Tirano is really nice, the railway runs down the road into town, past the church and stops next to the Trenitalia station, it was €19 to get to Milan but I spent the evening in Tirano with a nice hotel for about €30.

I'll get photo links to my one drive later

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2019, 03:23:26 pm »
There is an overnight train from Paris that splits at Milan and goes on to Venice. The Thello. May not take your bike. I suspect any of these super express things dont - you will be relying on smaller stopping trains. there is a station at Rimini (from Bologna or Venice)and Cesanatico (Venice)

yorkie

  • On top of the Galibier
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2019, 04:38:36 pm »
Sadly, Thello only take bikes when fully dismantled and in a case/bag:

https://www.thello.com/en/paris-venice/luggage/
Born to ride my bike, forced to work! ;)

British Cycling Regional Track Commissaire
British Cycling Regional Circuit Commissaire

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2019, 04:47:21 pm »

There is an IC service that runs from Frankfurt via Innsbruck on to Venice, that does take bikes.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2019, 04:50:19 pm »
Not an ideal option but I know people who have succeeded with blagging a blablacar booking, while taking a bike, either on a bike rack or if in a van, sticking it in the boot. One of my friends got herself and her bike from Bonn to London for something like £40. Not as leg-stretchy as a train, of course.
YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2019, 05:18:51 pm »
I took my touring bike* on two German ICE trains and Eurostar last week by packing it rinko style.

(* a completely ordinary 700c road bike with full length mudguards and a pannier rack)

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2019, 06:53:31 pm »
I took my touring bike* on two German ICE trains and Eurostar last week by packing it rinko style.

(* a completely ordinary 700c road bike with full length mudguards and a pannier rack)

Please elaborate on what "rinko style" means.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2019, 07:49:59 pm »
I took my touring bike* on two German ICE trains and Eurostar last week by packing it rinko style.

(* a completely ordinary 700c road bike with full length mudguards and a pannier rack)

You can take a bike on some ICE services, specifically those that use the ICE 4 stock. Reservation is required.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2019, 08:23:18 pm »
Bike area on an ICE 4 set
https://www.vagonweb.cz/fotogalerie/foto/201902/IMG_20190503_194755.jpg
https://www.vagonweb.cz/fotogalerie/foto/201902/IMG_20190503_194848.jpg

DBs idea of limited capacity seems to be significantly more than National Rail's concept of bike capacity...

ICE-T's also seem to have 3 bike spaces

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2019, 08:42:02 pm »
Please elaborate on what "rinko style" means.

Like this.

Except that says you need to buy lots of Rinko specific gear, whereas I used none. Instead of the stand, I used a block of chipboard in the drop-outs with a hole drilled through for the skewer. And instead of the bag, I acquired a couple of cheap black blankets from a Berlin €1 store and bungeed them round, which worked ok, but would have been a bit bulky to carry while riding.

Re: Manchester - Rimini by train and bike
« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2019, 10:40:44 am »
Ta.