Author Topic: Christmas dinner  (Read 626 times)

Christmas dinner
« on: December 26, 2019, 04:59:03 pm »
Darling grandaughter 8 years old, eats a third of her modest Christmas Dinner, claims she's full up, son in law tells her she's done well.
5 minutes later she's tucking into a huge slab of chocolate yule log. Any comment from me is considered to be unkind. This has repeated itself over many times. She's a bit chubby already.
We brought our children up to eat their dinner /lunch before even considering asking for a sweet.
Am I turning into an old meanie?

hellymedic

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Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2019, 06:16:44 pm »
See my response in Kidstuff.

Actually, getting full on foods with lowish energy density might not be too advantageous for kids with small stomachs.

ian

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Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2019, 09:34:26 pm »
Not really, I had to eat overcooked liver as a child. The trauma is deep and I nearly once lost an eye to a twang of gristly sinew (what the fuck is that shit, I got even odds on some kind of sclerotic artery or deeply entrenched parasite with attitude?). Our kitchen had David Cronenberg as executive chef. Think less Michelin star more Michelin tyre. The one from Duel.

Of course, back then if you didn't eat your dinner, you got it for breakfast. And if you declined breakfast, it would be served for lunch. And then in the evening, it would be there: waiting. It would follow you with the enthusiasm of a demonic clown with a sharp chef's knife and a taste for your eternal soul, preferably julienned (admittedly, that's another story from my childhood). My mother couldn't cook but she didn't actually know she couldn't cook. Stop when it's black and there's a fire engine outside. It was her way or starvation. I watched Live Aid with some kind of perversely misplaced envy.

Parental indulgence of their children seems a modern thing. I don't know a single child who doesn't have advanced dining needs. Poppy can only eat cake. Of course, Poppy is a demon, and she gets cake when she wants it. Other kids get it anyway. Still, think on the bright side, the parental gift of climate change megadeath will probably get them before they drop dead from type 2 diabetes. Famine will get them in slimfits even if you fois gras them with chocolate cake now.
!nataS pihsroW

robgul

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Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2019, 09:47:16 pm »
Being the output of the post-war (2nd if you were wondering) baby boom I was brought up to eat all of the food presented to me - we weren't poor, it was really just a result of rationing* (which was still in force for some time) and not wasting** anything.

* that ended for meat in July 1954
** the waste-not/want-not mantra has followed me through life . . . .you should see the number of patches on some of my inner tubes!

Rob

Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2019, 11:29:23 pm »

T42

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Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2019, 09:57:58 am »
Our capon was crap.  In previous years they have been almost buttery in flavour and full of juice, but this one had wet flavourless flesh like recycled dishcloths. Most of my helping ended up in the dogs' bellies and there's still three-quarters of the thing in the fridge.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2019, 10:56:21 am »
Our capon was crap.  In previous years they have been almost buttery in flavour and full of juice, but this one had wet flavourless flesh like recycled dishcloths. Most of my helping ended up in the dogs' bellies and there's still three-quarters of the thing in the fridge.

Perhaps your previous ones were “proper” (and illegal?) capons, and this one was the modern “big chicken” version we get in the UK.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2019, 11:11:24 am »
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2019, 01:16:59 pm »
Capon is not illegal in the UK. Urban myth.

https://www.theguardian.com/notesandqueries/query/0,5753,-49244,00.html

It in the Guardian so it must be true (or a myth)   ;)


We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

T42

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Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2019, 01:49:58 pm »
Our capon was crap.  In previous years they have been almost buttery in flavour and full of juice, but this one had wet flavourless flesh like recycled dishcloths. Most of my helping ended up in the dogs' bellies and there's still three-quarters of the thing in the fridge.

Perhaps your previous ones were “proper” (and illegal?) capons, and this one was the modern “big chicken” version we get in the UK.

It certainly tasted (or rather, didn't) like a big chicken.  I tried to find out if chemical caponization is legal in France but got lots of results about the chemical industries being castrated by legistlation. Mind you, I didn't try very hard, I'm sick of the whole thing.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Christmas dinner
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2019, 01:55:13 pm »
They can be ordered on line from suppliers various at around the £26 mark.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain