Author Topic: Fabric Glue  (Read 486 times)

CommuteTooFar

  • Inadequate Randonneur
Fabric Glue
« on: January 28, 2020, 11:15:11 am »
I want to repair the coat hook which detached itself earlier this year.

The coat hook is attached to a piece of fabric 10 x 10 cm. So there is a good area to attach it to the coat.

Requirements of Glue. 
  Works on fabric (which is not perfectly clean)
  Flexible
  Strong enough to support coat and careless handling

A quick google for fabric glue was not successful.  It showed two types. The first is used for tacking so no strength.  The second group are used for light work such as attaching glitter and beads to clothes.

What would you use?

Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2020, 11:31:59 am »
The Bostik has worked for me. Even for AUK Badges. There is another (Evostik??) but that isn’t as good. Both Bought on eBay.

Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2020, 11:39:13 am »

What would you use?
For cosmetic stuff, probably Copydex (or similar) maybe Evostik impact adhesive - both of which remain flexible when cured.
For structural stuff, stitches.
Every time.

Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2020, 11:41:12 am »

For structural stuff, stitches.
Every time.

^^This.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2020, 12:54:45 pm »

For structural stuff, stitches.
Every time.

^^This.

There's a Rule According To Kim that states that if you're using adhesives, then you're probably doing it wrong.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...


bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2020, 02:56:55 pm »
Stitch it on. Anything that's load-bearing in any way won't last with glue. By contrast stitches go on and on and on, especially with quality line like waxed cotton.

I've even stitched tyres and happily done hundreds of kms on them (with a patch on the inside).

YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2020, 04:13:14 pm »
Stitch it! Half a dozen other yacfers can't ALL be wrong!

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2020, 04:51:45 pm »
Glue it *and* stitch it.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2020, 05:45:34 pm »
You could do. Most glues do not tolerate the stretch and movement to which coat loops are subject and will come adrift, especially if the substances glued are not quite clean, as suggested in the OP.

There has to be a reason why clothing manufacturers stitch their loops.

A pop-rivet or cable tie could do the job but would be hell to wear. I certainly would not like stiff plastic abutting the nape of my neck!

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2020, 05:57:47 pm »
You could do. Most glues do not tolerate the stretch and movement to which coat loops are subject and will come adrift, especially if the substances glued are not quite clean, as suggested in the OP.

Glue will spread the load, stitching will prevent the glue from peeling.


Quote
There has to be a reason why clothing manufacturers stitch their loops.

It works well enough, and they're already stitching other things.  You don't introduce another step to the manufacturing process unless you have to.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2020, 09:13:49 pm »
You can get proper fabric glue. I used some as seam on hood of of a goretex jacket that has elastic through came apart. Repair place said too thin to sew. Too plastic to wonder web. Glue took a few days to cure but worked fine.

Re: Fabric Glue
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2020, 09:31:20 pm »
I often see 'tether' points on tents, rucksacks, kit bags, etc. which are most definitely glued or bonded.  I wonder how that works?