Author Topic: Reasons to carry cash  (Read 1905 times)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #25 on: May 28, 2020, 10:00:42 am »
I'm doing shopping for our elderly neighbours, who pay me in cash (a mixture of notes and coins). 

But I've not actually used any cash in the last couple of months so I now have a wallet bursting with notes and a large bowl full of coins...
Bank branches are still open and accepting paying in cash as a valid reason for visiting. Alternatively, you could put it in a charity box somewhere.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #26 on: May 28, 2020, 10:02:44 am »
Fish & Chips.  Most of the chippys I've been in relieve you of cash only.
Along with cake, that has to be the best reason!
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #27 on: May 28, 2020, 10:16:18 am »
One of the pubs in the village is only accepting cash for its take away meals.  They've closed down all their electronics.
Ironically, this is the only pub where I routinely use a card for drinks purchases as it's rather expensive.
It is the only cash I've used since the lockdown started.
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #28 on: May 28, 2020, 10:32:36 am »
The only place we use cash is the launderette, often we have to buy a bag of pound coins for this purpose.

Cash it's a pain, it takes up a load of room, comes in faffy denominations, and is dirty.

I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.
Somewhat of a professional tea drinker.


Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #29 on: May 28, 2020, 10:40:52 am »
Launderettes and coin-operated machines are another one I forgot. Although we have a washing machine, I do very occasionally use a launderette for items too bulky, but that particular launderette is part of a cafe (it also has live music in the evenings – obviously all shut at the moment, but there's a sign outside they're still doing service washes) so getting change (in fact it's a token rather than coins) is not a problem.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #30 on: May 28, 2020, 10:42:15 am »
Launderettes and coin-operated machines are another one I forgot. Although we have a washing machine, I do very occasionally use a launderette for items too bulky, but that particular launderette is part of a cafe (it also has live music in the evenings – obviously all shut at the moment, but there's a sign outside they're still doing service washes) so getting change (in fact it's a token rather than coins) is not a problem.

We use the one in town for the tumble dryers, when we redevelop the kitchen we may buy a tumble dryer removing that need. During the summer we dry things on the washing line in the garden.
Somewhat of a professional tea drinker.


Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #31 on: May 28, 2020, 10:42:34 am »
As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #32 on: May 28, 2020, 12:01:32 pm »
In your extensive list you seem to have missed "spending a penny".   ;)

I am by nature a cash person.  Before lockdown I would shop in small, local shops, use the market and even pay by cash in cafes etc.  Lockdown has forced me to go contactless which is a real pain because I cannot read the screen to know if the transaction has been accepted or declined.  Further, since they upped the contactless transaction limit my card seems to be rejected once a week.  Before that, never.  Perhaps that is mere coincidence though as I haven't been using the cash point.

I did my usual weekly cash withdrawal on the Monday before lockdown and I am still spending it.  A couple of small local suppliers are still accepting cash but it amounts to about a tenner a week on average.

I also keep an emergency wad in the house for those "just in case" moments.  I started doing it 20 years ago when my father became seriously ill.  A taxi ride of 35 miles at 2 in the morning was a distinct possibility.

I cannot wait to get back to proper money and away from the prying eyes of government and the bank.

Feels like so long since I've been to the market, that I'd forgotten that one
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

offcumden

  • Oh, no!
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #33 on: May 28, 2020, 12:05:13 pm »
This thread has made me think. I habitually pay in cash in cafés, which can result in a heavy load of change in my back pocket while out on a ride. I often have a card with me in any case, which would avoid that problem. Furthermore*, there must be a list of 'reasons to carry a card': eg slipping a Yale-type cylinder lock when 'going equipped'.


*Ooh, haven't used that nice word for yonks!  Talking of words, I love Cudzo's 'austeritised'; near enough to 'sterilised' to suggest 'rendered impotent'.

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #34 on: May 28, 2020, 12:24:40 pm »
Further, since they upped the contactless transaction limit my card seems to be rejected once a week.  Before that, never.  Perhaps that is mere coincidence though as I haven't been using the cash point.
That is part of the bank's fraud detection system, the bank wants to check that you still control the card. You can probably reduce the rejection rate by explicitly entering you pin for some payments, or by using a cash point to check your balance.

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #35 on: May 28, 2020, 12:27:08 pm »
I was always a cash person.   I'm down to the last fiver of the 30 quid I had in my wallet at the start of the lockdown.

I found cash easier to budget, taking out enough coffee and snack money to last me the week.   I found it a lot easier whilst riding as well. although you do end up with a pocket full of change.

I'm always stood behind someone in a queue at a coffee shop whose contactless/phone/watch won't scan so they can buy their decaff soya latte.   At times I feel that new technology is not necessarily better.

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #36 on: May 28, 2020, 01:02:06 pm »

  • For use in small shops that still don't take cards
  • For small purchases in shops with a card minimum


I don't think there is a car minimum any more (I could be completely wrong...) but the local Gifte Shoppe for trinkets, geegaws and cards prefers contactless. And the local farm shop too has removed it's £5 minimum for cards.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #37 on: May 28, 2020, 08:59:53 pm »
I'm doing shopping for our elderly neighbours, who pay me in cash (a mixture of notes and coins). 

But I've not actually used any cash in the last couple of months so I now have a wallet bursting with notes and a large bowl full of coins...

I have ordered groceries from Sainsbury's online on my account for my Ancient Parents, who have repaid me with cash. This is useful when I'm taking many taxis but now I have a rather full wallet.

My parents like Nice Foods and have had several consignments...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #38 on: May 28, 2020, 09:57:12 pm »

  • For use in small shops that still don't take cards
  • For small purchases in shops with a card minimum


I don't think there is a car minimum any more (I could be completely wrong...) but the local Gifte Shoppe for trinkets, geegaws and cards prefers contactless. And the local farm shop too has removed it's £5 minimum for cards.
I was surprised to find, early in lockdown, that the local Korean shop was still applying its £5 card minimum. So I bought more tofu and noodles.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #39 on: May 28, 2020, 09:58:31 pm »
*Ooh, haven't used that nice word for yonks!  Talking of words, I love Cudzo's 'austeritised'; near enough to 'sterilised' to suggest 'rendered impotent'.
Thank you, but I don't think I invented it. Nor had the similarity to sterlised occurred to me, though it is very appropriate.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #40 on: May 28, 2020, 11:30:34 pm »
When I worked for a certain cash machine manufacturer in their R&D there was always the need to convince people that cash will always be useful, and so to therefore would cash machines.
I don't know what the people that went to the trade shows actually told customers what future cash might have, but the behind the scenes comments about what might still need to be paid for in cash in future isn't in that list...

It was their major fear, if cash is no longer required, what purpose the ATM?
So all the work relating to contactless I did was "defensive" i.e. how does our machine still have a purpose in a cash free world.

Never really envisaged the rise in honesty box shops tbh.
I guess the behind the scenes comments refer to:
I give Clif bars to beggars, the way I'm not feeding anybody's drug/alcohol habit.
And I guess even there, it only applies at street level, with the mister bigs channelling the money through front business and so on.

Nah that's quite tame.
You need to get closer to the gutter.

I imagine the behind the scenes comments were referring to a baser, and much older trade.

That was one of them, my slip ups of referring to Coca-Cola as Coke in France is the subject of another other.
Joint bank accounts were also seen as a reason people might not want to spend by card in certain places.

Fish & Chips.  Most of the chippys I've been in relieve you of cash only.

My local one has finally started taking card payments, they started around I think February.

One of the pubs in the village is only accepting cash for its take away meals.  They've closed down all their electronics.
Ironically, this is the only pub where I routinely use a card for drinks purchases as it's rather expensive.
It is the only cash I've used since the lockdown started.

That's a bit odd, cash is a vector being passed between people, a card machine can be wiped down between usages.

I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.

It's likely that physical cards will end up being phased out in favour of virtual things in phones.
One less thing for the banks to have to pay for and manage.

As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...

Sounds like Gemalto.
There's plenty of things they can put their RFID chips into, including the active ones in phones...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemalto

Think it was their predecessor Gemplus we kind of worked with a bit, I can't remember if they were pushing the transition from sticking RFID chips in the back of Nokia 3330 cases to the active chips going in the phones electronics though. It was nearly around 18 years ago after all...


I don't think there is a car minimum any more (I could be completely wrong...) but the local Gifte Shoppe for trinkets, geegaws and cards prefers contactless. And the local farm shop too has removed it's £5 minimum for cards.

The idea was that the banks would charge less for card payments than the costs of banking money both in terms of cost at the bank and in personnel time to cash up and take it to the bank.
Having walked through the city centre with 3 grand of notes I'd cashed in order to buy change and walk back to the shop with considerably less than 3 grand in coins, I understand their aim.


Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #41 on: May 28, 2020, 11:43:31 pm »
I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.

It's likely that physical cards will end up being phased out in favour of virtual things in phones.
One less thing for the banks to have to pay for and manage.

As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...

Sounds like Gemalto.
There's plenty of things they can put their RFID chips into, including the active ones in phones...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemalto

Think it was their predecessor Gemplus we kind of worked with a bit, I can't remember if they were pushing the transition from sticking RFID chips in the back of Nokia 3330 cases to the active chips going in the phones electronics though. It was nearly around 18 years ago after all...
Not Gemalto. This was a firm that makes the physical cards (and various ID systems for eg governments), when asked if they were worried about this part of their business declining due to the move to phones eSIMs, they said no, cos "the movement is from cash to card, not from card to phone." Which might be bluster or might be true, on a global basis; though I'm sure there will be parts of the world where the movement is from cash to phones with no intervening plastic cards.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #42 on: May 29, 2020, 12:03:57 am »
I’m quite sure that the ladies that asked me “Djuwaantbuzness” in Blythswood Square would have professed a desire for cash over card.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #43 on: May 29, 2020, 09:46:05 am »
I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.

It's likely that physical cards will end up being phased out in favour of virtual things in phones.
One less thing for the banks to have to pay for and manage.

As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...

Sounds like Gemalto.
There's plenty of things they can put their RFID chips into, including the active ones in phones...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemalto

Think it was their predecessor Gemplus we kind of worked with a bit, I can't remember if they were pushing the transition from sticking RFID chips in the back of Nokia 3330 cases to the active chips going in the phones electronics though. It was nearly around 18 years ago after all...
Not Gemalto. This was a firm that makes the physical cards (and various ID systems for eg governments), when asked if they were worried about this part of their business declining due to the move to phones eSIMs, they said no, cos "the movement is from cash to card, not from card to phone." Which might be bluster or might be true, on a global basis; though I'm sure there will be parts of the world where the movement is from cash to phones with no intervening plastic cards.

There's actually a large number of places in the UK you are forbidden to have a mobile device with you, that also have shops, cafes and the like. I don't imagine other countries are dissimilar. Surprisingly some of those places don't take cash either.
Somewhat of a professional tea drinker.


Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #44 on: May 29, 2020, 09:57:33 am »
I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.

It's likely that physical cards will end up being phased out in favour of virtual things in phones.
One less thing for the banks to have to pay for and manage.

As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...

Sounds like Gemalto.
There's plenty of things they can put their RFID chips into, including the active ones in phones...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemalto

Think it was their predecessor Gemplus we kind of worked with a bit, I can't remember if they were pushing the transition from sticking RFID chips in the back of Nokia 3330 cases to the active chips going in the phones electronics though. It was nearly around 18 years ago after all...
Not Gemalto. This was a firm that makes the physical cards (and various ID systems for eg governments), when asked if they were worried about this part of their business declining due to the move to phones eSIMs, they said no, cos "the movement is from cash to card, not from card to phone." Which might be bluster or might be true, on a global basis; though I'm sure there will be parts of the world where the movement is from cash to phones with no intervening plastic cards.

There's actually a large number of places in the UK you are forbidden to have a mobile device with you, that also have shops, cafes and the like. I don't imagine other countries are dissimilar. Surprisingly some of those places don't take cash either.

Apart from prisons/detention centres, I'm struggling to think of places where mobile phones are now banned in the UK.
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

nicknack

  • Hornblower
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #45 on: May 29, 2020, 10:09:52 am »
Before the lockdown I was virtually always paid in cash (music teaching and gigging). Most of that cash went back to pubs. Since the lockdown I've had no income and no visits to pubs so the cash that was in my wallet at the start (£155 as it happens) is still there. I'm looking forward to spending it sometime.
There's no vibrations, but wait.

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #46 on: May 29, 2020, 10:16:59 am »
I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.

It's likely that physical cards will end up being phased out in favour of virtual things in phones.
One less thing for the banks to have to pay for and manage.

As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...

Sounds like Gemalto.
There's plenty of things they can put their RFID chips into, including the active ones in phones...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemalto

Think it was their predecessor Gemplus we kind of worked with a bit, I can't remember if they were pushing the transition from sticking RFID chips in the back of Nokia 3330 cases to the active chips going in the phones electronics though. It was nearly around 18 years ago after all...
Not Gemalto. This was a firm that makes the physical cards (and various ID systems for eg governments), when asked if they were worried about this part of their business declining due to the move to phones eSIMs, they said no, cos "the movement is from cash to card, not from card to phone." Which might be bluster or might be true, on a global basis; though I'm sure there will be parts of the world where the movement is from cash to phones with no intervening plastic cards.

There's actually a large number of places in the UK you are forbidden to have a mobile device with you, that also have shops, cafes and the like. I don't imagine other countries are dissimilar. Surprisingly some of those places don't take cash either.

Apart from prisons/detention centres, I'm struggling to think of places where mobile phones are now banned in the UK.

Most government buildings
Somewhat of a professional tea drinker.


Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #47 on: May 29, 2020, 10:22:39 am »
I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.

It's likely that physical cards will end up being phased out in favour of virtual things in phones.
One less thing for the banks to have to pay for and manage.

As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...

Sounds like Gemalto.
There's plenty of things they can put their RFID chips into, including the active ones in phones...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemalto

Think it was their predecessor Gemplus we kind of worked with a bit, I can't remember if they were pushing the transition from sticking RFID chips in the back of Nokia 3330 cases to the active chips going in the phones electronics though. It was nearly around 18 years ago after all...
Not Gemalto. This was a firm that makes the physical cards (and various ID systems for eg governments), when asked if they were worried about this part of their business declining due to the move to phones eSIMs, they said no, cos "the movement is from cash to card, not from card to phone." Which might be bluster or might be true, on a global basis; though I'm sure there will be parts of the world where the movement is from cash to phones with no intervening plastic cards.

There's actually a large number of places in the UK you are forbidden to have a mobile device with you, that also have shops, cafes and the like. I don't imagine other countries are dissimilar. Surprisingly some of those places don't take cash either.

Apart from prisons/detention centres, I'm struggling to think of places where mobile phones are now banned in the UK.

Most government buildings

Really?  I've been in and out of the MoD and a number of bases (most recently DNRC Stanford Hall), the DHSC and the Cabinet Office in recent months.  I've been through security in each and never been asked about my mobile phone.

The only places in the last five years where I've had to surrender my phone were a prison and an immigration detention centre.
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #48 on: May 29, 2020, 10:27:04 am »
I know a place where mobiles are not allowed. If I contact my friend that works there, I know I won't get a reply until after work.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Reasons to carry cash
« Reply #49 on: May 29, 2020, 10:28:51 am »
I've not jumped on the phone tap pay thing yet as I tend to work in places I can't have my phone, but contactless bank cards are a win for me, I went from a hulking great wallet to a tiny thing with 3 cards in it.

It's likely that physical cards will end up being phased out in favour of virtual things in phones.
One less thing for the banks to have to pay for and manage.

As for the phone pay thing, I heard a while back a French manufacturer of bank and sim cards claim they are not worried about the growth in phone and online payments. Which can be interpreted in many ways...

Sounds like Gemalto.
There's plenty of things they can put their RFID chips into, including the active ones in phones...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemalto

Think it was their predecessor Gemplus we kind of worked with a bit, I can't remember if they were pushing the transition from sticking RFID chips in the back of Nokia 3330 cases to the active chips going in the phones electronics though. It was nearly around 18 years ago after all...
Not Gemalto. This was a firm that makes the physical cards (and various ID systems for eg governments), when asked if they were worried about this part of their business declining due to the move to phones eSIMs, they said no, cos "the movement is from cash to card, not from card to phone." Which might be bluster or might be true, on a global basis; though I'm sure there will be parts of the world where the movement is from cash to phones with no intervening plastic cards.

There's actually a large number of places in the UK you are forbidden to have a mobile device with you, that also have shops, cafes and the like. I don't imagine other countries are dissimilar. Surprisingly some of those places don't take cash either.

Apart from prisons/detention centres, I'm struggling to think of places where mobile phones are now banned in the UK.

Most government buildings

Really?  I've been in and out of the MoD and a number of bases (most recently DNRC Stanford Hall), the DHSC and the Cabinet Office in recent months.  I've been through security in each and never been asked about my mobile phone.

The only places in the last five years where I've had to surrender my phone were a prison and an immigration detention centre.

The bits you went to.

There is quite a lot of government buildings, and some contractor buildings were the same rules apply. Sometimes you leave it a reception sometimes you have to leave it in the car park. The firm I work for make us leave them in lockers in reception because the government accreditors say that is what we must do, always have to check the rules before visiting a site.
Somewhat of a professional tea drinker.