Author Topic: Home Gym Equipment  (Read 768 times)

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Home Gym Equipment
« Reply #25 on: November 19, 2020, 08:39:54 pm »
Our garage is home to a Concept II rowing machine, which we acquired about 9 years ago and has been put to more use this year than in the previous 8 combined.  We also have free weights with an olympic bar (we were well advised to pay more for a robust set of weights).  You can get adjustable dumbells - they come with a stand and you twist the grip to attach or detach weights - giving a range of 2kg to 20kg - which is much more compact than the traditional racks of weights you see in gyms.  We also have a Swiss Ball, bench and Bosu balance board, and a stepper - all of these can be tucked away into quite a small space.  These were all acquired about 5 years ago.  The only addition since has been squat stands.  We thought about a machine but it would have been more constraining than the weights which can all be stacked in a corner if we need the space for something else (like when we had our kitchen redone).

Although we looked on-line, (sadly not practical at the moment), spending an hour or so in a retail outlet really helped us to make choices that suited us - we could play around with kit and the staff knew a lot about the products.  The only thing that is a bit marginal is the squat stands.
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 175 (metric) 529 (furlongs)  112 (nautical miles)

Re: Home Gym Equipment
« Reply #26 on: November 19, 2020, 10:10:14 pm »
I've got a mostly desk/office job but I'm often on the shop floor. Since coming back from furlough it's been all hands on deck. I've been working on the shop floor with the directors too at times. It's about fewer people doing the same amount of work as before but occasionally that doesn't work so wen get stuck in. It's been more and more lately. As a result what you called functional fitness has started to kick in. TBH it's partly learning how to lift the heavy or irregular stuff? Bending over, dragging, pushing, etc. Don't tell HSE but at times it's simply easier to lift the heavy stuff on your own than finding someone free to help you. I've lifted 38kg+ of large and difficult to grip objects and lift it over a metre high, even once onto my shoulder. You can feel your strength improving but at least part is technique in lifting such things.

However despite that physical work leisure activity doesn't become easier. I'm no better at walking up a steep hill because of functional exercise through work. Wrong kind of training I guess.

What I need is CV exercise, core exercises and strengthening major muscle groups for general health and for outdoor activities we do. It is why I like good rowers and this versaclimber because they provide excellent CV training but also a degree of physical strength training with it. You're using major muscle groups, which raises your heart rate,  but you're moving in a way that also uses secondary muscle groups that work with the main group. It's similar to functional training because that uses other muscles that work in a stabilizing way with the main muscles being exercised.

It's why resistance pulley type of weights machines are a bit flawed because they focus too much on a small muscle group. Whereas lunges with weights provide a dynamic strength training that works your core muscles with your leg and arm muscles because they stabilise you giving you balance. Or that was kind of what the trainer told me years ago when she got me onto my last reprogram before I left the gym. I didn't give up because it was so much harder but because I decided not to waste my money on membership as in used it less and less.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: Home Gym Equipment
« Reply #27 on: November 20, 2020, 09:56:01 pm »
You are right about technique.  My Kawai piano weighs in at 280Kg, which is strong man territory.  The two professional piano movers who delivered it to my living room would have weighed about 140Kg between the two of them, but they knew exactly how to lift and shift it around corners.

When I'm strength training my cycling suffers, but it picks up more as soon as I stop the strength work.  I don't have a physiological explanation for it - but after a winter of good strength work I'd do better in the subsequent summer.
Eddington Numbers 125 (imperial), 175 (metric) 529 (furlongs)  112 (nautical miles)

Re: Home Gym Equipment
« Reply #28 on: November 23, 2020, 07:00:54 pm »
http://www.versaclimber.co.uk/products/versaclimber-home/

This is the one I've been looking at. Apparently this one offers the user a wider range of resistance levels? Indeed most other versions of this don't have the ability to adjust the resistance levels.

Apparently it's a very good CV exercise that works almost all muscle groups and you can change body position or hand grip positions to work more areas or focus on certain areas for me effect. Kind of like spinning with bikes but a lot better and more efficient.

These are excellent and very hard work.  They are very underrated.

I used one in a local gym in the late nineties as part of my rehab after a broken leg /dislocated ankle.