Author Topic: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house  (Read 4153 times)

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #75 on: February 11, 2021, 12:56:59 pm »
Pinky and Perky the pointing duo are using lime mortar for the repointing.



The boxwork around the gallows brackets turned into a faux fireplace along with a cast insert for £5 off Gumtree and a free oak surround off Facebook. (And yes, before you ask, there will be a couple of noggins for the boarding at the top, but not 4x2)


Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #76 on: February 11, 2021, 01:07:33 pm »
Gallows brackets ???
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #77 on: February 11, 2021, 01:48:48 pm »
The "old style" way of removing fireplaces was to support the remainder of the stack (once having removed the lower part) with an angle iron bracket with a brace (hence, gallows)



I really don't like them, and would prefer to remove the stack all the way to the top but that would be a substantial additional effort  and require building control. So, I took a deep breath and made up the faux fireplace, ignoring the c.5cm the wall leans outward at the top, as that seems very historic (there's an OLD wall tie that looks as if it was intended to address that) and best left well alone. (you can just see the bottom of the brackets at the top)

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #78 on: February 11, 2021, 05:27:40 pm »
You're quite right to 'really not like' gallows brackets.  I would avoid specifying a gallows bracket solution at virtually all costs.  Especially where the chimney breast is on a party wall, where the adjoining property may well do something similar, and you end up with two chimney breasts precariously balanced either side of the wall...  :o

The best solution is a ceiling-level steel in line with the front of the breast, and little 'needle' beams to support the cheeks.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #79 on: February 11, 2021, 05:55:20 pm »
Everyday is a school day...
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #80 on: February 11, 2021, 06:15:53 pm »

The best solution is a ceiling-level steel in line with the front of the breast, and little 'needle' beams to support the cheeks.

Isn't the best solution to take out the whole stack, top to  bottom and make good? In my simple mind the buttress effect of the stack is overwhelmingly negated by the torsional effect of a couple of tons of brick stuck out 18"?

It's a flank wall, and they took out both fireplaces. I'd leave the rear one which is smaller. They also buggered with the bay, but the relief arch is just about still in place. It looks like the centre of the front has dropped, and the flank wall is all about the place but - apparently - stable. I put little weight behind the original works being done under building control, but as it was done  >20 years ago, it is likely stable now.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #81 on: February 12, 2021, 09:52:01 am »
Oops..  My neighbours have just had the chimney breast replaced with gallows brackets.  I think I might nip round there later and tell them we are planning to do the same :demon:
Sic transit and all that..

nicknack

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #82 on: February 12, 2021, 10:12:52 am »
Our old house (we left 7 years ago) was in the family since 1969. A fairly standard 30s two storey detached house with a chimney in the middle between the two downstairs living rooms. When we moved in, dad (a builder and decorator by trade) removed the chimney breast in one of the downstairs rooms and the bedroom above it. The section in the loft he left unsupported. As far as I know it's still like it.
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #83 on: February 12, 2021, 11:33:37 am »
The best solution is a ceiling-level steel in line with the front of the breast, and little 'needle' beams to support the cheeks.
Isn't the best solution to take out the whole stack, top to  bottom and make good? In my simple mind the buttress effect of the stack is overwhelmingly negated by the torsional effect of a couple of tons of brick stuck out 18"?
Yebbut sometimes you don't have the luxury of being able to do that (e.g. where the chimney stack is shared, or where the purlins bear onto the shoulders of the chimney at roof-level).
...dad (a builder and decorator by trade) removed the chimney breast in one of the downstairs rooms and the bedroom above it. The section in the loft he left unsupported. As far as I know it's still like it.
:o  It's amazing what does stand up.  I often see things like masonry first-floor walls built directly off timber joists, or (this morning) a purlin propped off a ceiling binder :facepalm:.