Author Topic: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???  (Read 4104 times)

Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« on: January 10, 2021, 01:28:04 am »
I've looking for a pair of gloves for around £50 which will do the job of keeping my hands warm on early morning rides where temperatures will be just below 0°C. I've had a look on Amazon and there is plenty of Chinese garbage for around £15-28 and incidentally if you use a Chrome plugin called Keepa (Amazon historical price tracking) you will see a lot of sellers have upped their prices for the cold spell. So often £17 gloves will be now £25.
Anyways I've also looked at bike site reviews for winter gloves and can't find anything that will reliably do the job for the £50 bracket unless one wants to fork out another £30-40. I've looked at recommendations and looked at reviews only to find most hit the dust when ridden at the temps we're getting now. I'm not too bothered about if they are waterproof or not warmth is the key goal. I can always coat them with something like Fabsil and couldn't care less if they come with silicone inserts and prefer if they didn't.
What I've also noticed is when looking at local reviews on Amazon for winter gloves how many of the reviews are dated back to September 2020!!! Weren't we having a bit of a hot spell then  :facepalm: Jeff Bezos :demon: wants your money

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2021, 02:54:30 am »
I've found Altura Night Vision gloves perfectly adequate down to just sub-zero temps. If it's much colder than that then a pair of thin silk liners paired with the Night Vision sorts me out.
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PaulF

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2021, 07:13:13 am »
Warmest gloves I’ve worn are Bontrager Lobster claws a cross between a glove an a mitten.

Alternatively you could try hotpog pogies which are insulated shield that mount on the bars and you can wear lighter gloves underneath.

Hot Flatus

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2021, 07:17:24 am »
Depends on your hands. Ditto feet. Some people seem to feel it more. 

Gloves are a perennial problem, along with overshoes, in that they are the one piece of kit that never fully delivers. They always seem compromised by something. Pain in the arse.  I got a pair of Rapha Deep Winter gloves 2 years ago from Chain Reaction. They were the 2016 model and they have proved excellent.  The only problem for you is thay if you buy them now they are £140 which is outrageous.  I paid £44.

I can't offer any advice other than but something that looks like a ski glove.  I don't think you can avoid the bulkiness if you want dry warm hands.

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2021, 07:21:51 am »
I've generally got on better with layering rather than one pair of very thick gloves.  I'm currently using Dissent 133, which is a system with four pairs - liner, warm layer, windproof and waterproof overgloves.  It's probably as good as anything else I've used. 

Warm hands is not only about gloves though - keeping core temperature up is also important (and more so if you have Reynauds). 

robgul

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2021, 08:19:42 am »
Whichever gloves you go for - get a pair of very thin silk gloves to wear as inners - makes an amazing difference to warmth
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fboab

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2021, 08:42:43 am »
We never got on terribly well with layering - I say 'we' as it's Mr Smith's hands controlling the bike I'm on!
If you have big hands then you may struggle to get gloves big enough to layer successfully.
I paid a lot of money for his gloves (there's an old thread somewhere describing which models I went for) but not Rapha money - that's ridiculous.
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slope

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2021, 09:17:22 am »
I ordered a pair of Buffalo Mitts yesterday as I suffer greatly from dreaded painful white knuckle cold hands - £44 inc post (as mentioned by quixoticgeek on page 8 in the e-scooter trail thread)

https://www.silvermans.co.uk/products/buffalo-mitts?variant=19774613749814

Will report back in a few days.

I don't use STi or Ergo levers and have up until now been using cheap PlanetX lobster gloves (have tried using with thin liners too - however the PX design isn't really compatible with separate liners, as they already have one built in and an extra liner gets all caught up!). They work ok-ish until hands get sweaty and then cool down considerably - probably takes  <an hour, depending on how low outside temp/wind/rain etc

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2021, 10:14:09 am »
You might also look at industrial gloves.  I had a pair given to me when I temporarily worked in a warehouse cold store, it had to be freezing for them to be comfortable on the bike, lasted well till last year.  Couldn't find anything that looked identical, but I've ordered a couple of other pairs from here to try
https://www.safetygloves.co.uk/freezer-gloves.html?scroll=1800

I already have a good selection of gloves, my favourites tend to only cover a narrow range of conditions, it's those that claim otherwise that have been most disappointing, I may take three pairs if I'm out all day and it's changeable.

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2021, 10:15:12 am »
I’ve got a pair of Castelli Extreme something or other - they were 80 quid and are good in cold, but less so in sustained rain. I’ve some older waterproof gloves that I layer for that.

Cudzoziemiec

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2021, 10:23:14 am »
I've never tried pogies (bar mitts) for cycling but back when I had a motorbike, they made far more difference, and far more cheaply, than any pair of gloves. I think it's basically because they act as a windshield and allow your hands to create their own little microclimate. So if you can get some that fit on drop bars and allow control of brakes and shifters (if you're using flat bars it's easy) I'd try those.
Faster than a walk, slower than a train, often slightly higher than a person. (David Byrne)

TimC

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2021, 11:31:10 am »
I really suffer with cold extremities, and I haven't found a clothing solution to it. I've taken to using chemical warming pads if I'm going to go out and ride a decent distance in winter. They're a waste for a short ride, as they last for ages once activated. I do do the layering thing, and I use Altura Night Vision gloves as recommended above, but they aren't enough - for me - on their own.

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2021, 11:36:19 am »
Whichever gloves you go for - get a pair of very thin silk gloves to wear as inners - makes an amazing difference to warmth
Silk liners never worked for me.

FifeingEejit

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2021, 11:39:34 am »
I use DeFeet wool or coolmax gloves under MTB gloves when I remember it's cold enough to want an extra layer over the fingers.
I've always found proper winter thick gloves compromise my ability to operate the controls far too much, even more than forgetting it's cold enough and using the DeFeets under Mitts and having my fingertips near frozen off.

Also means I can still operate a camera  ;D

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2021, 11:45:31 am »
Like TinC I get cold extremities. This winter I’ve splashed out. For gloves GripGrab Optimus for a 5 fingered version, ok down to freezing for me with liners. That lot was £127 from Wiggle.  For lower temps still, the GripGrab Nordic Lobster. Those I got (just) pre-Brexit from LordGun in Brescia, Italy. They’re listed as £48 now, but only the XL available and no idea if they’ll ship to UK.

For me feet the Lake MXZ304 boots, more like ski than cycling boots, but effective on my perennially cold feet. Not toasty all day sub-zero effective, but ok for me for 1 1/2 sub-zero hours. A snip at (gulp) £237 from Saltdog cycling.
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Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2021, 12:05:23 pm »
Whichever gloves you go for - get a pair of very thin silk gloves to wear as inners - makes an amazing difference to warmth
Silk liners never worked for me.
They didn't work for me either, though mine were artificial silk.

One other point – don't think it's been mentioned yet – you can lose a lot of heat through your wrists and a jacket sleeve always lets some cold air in, so a glove that comes a decent length up the wrist is a good idea.
Faster than a walk, slower than a train, often slightly higher than a person. (David Byrne)

Kim

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2021, 12:31:29 pm »
I find silk liners are excellent, because they keep wet hands warm.  They're also small and lightweight, so a prime candidate for carrying on the bike in case you need an emergency glove upgrade.

I suspect there are people whose hands don't end up sodden just because they're riding a bike, who are going to benefit more from gloves that keep the moisture out than ones that stay warm when wet (which is more about windproofing).
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2021, 01:34:55 pm »
I find liners help a little but if your gloves are already a snug fit on the fingers then their benefit is reduced somewhat as there is less room for air spaces.

Has anyone tried adding a thin outer layer, rather than a liner?

I have been toying with getting this combination, outer + knitted wool glove:

Outer shell:
https://www.endurasport.com/Adrenaline-Shell-Glove/p/E0130-Black

Main glove:
https://showerspass.co.uk/collections/mens-gloves/products/crosspoint-waterproof-knit-wool-gloves


FifeingEejit

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2021, 01:56:37 pm »
I find liners help a little but if your gloves are already a snug fit on the fingers then their benefit is reduced somewhat as there is less room for air spaces.

Has anyone tried adding a thin outer layer, rather than a liner?

I have been toying with getting this combination, outer + knitted wool glove:

Outer shell:
https://www.endurasport.com/Adrenaline-Shell-Glove/p/E0130-Black

Main glove:
https://showerspass.co.uk/collections/mens-gloves/products/crosspoint-waterproof-knit-wool-gloves

Hm, that looks like a variation on what I've been doing, might get a pair of those shell gloves, and those crosspoints look warmer than my defeets

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2021, 01:56:53 pm »
Main glove:
https://showerspass.co.uk/collections/mens-gloves/products/crosspoint-waterproof-knit-wool-gloves
I have two pairs of SP waterproof knit gloves (2nd pair were a free gift with another order), the previous wool version and the synthetic (Links below) they're both generally good.  Fairly warm, though not warm enough for the conditions in the OP.  I have the largest size and would benefit from them being a little larger.   They slip on easily enough at home, but if it's the sort of ride where they'll be on and off several times they get progressively harder, if my hands are already cold and damp it's too much of a struggle to put them on.

https://showerspass.co.uk/collections/waterproof-gloves/products/crosspoint-waterproof-knit-gloves

https://showerspass.co.uk/collections/waterproof-gloves/products/crosspoint-waterproof-knit-wool-gloves-2019

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2021, 02:01:44 pm »
I've found Altura Night Vision gloves perfectly adequate down to just sub-zero temps. If it's much colder than that then a pair of thin silk liners paired with the Night Vision sorts me out.

I agree. I have been using them down to about -2°C without issue. But they haven't been waterproof in a long time, even tho they are sold as such.

When it gets really cold I deploy these:

http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/products/hi-vis-mitt/

and when it gets really really cold, I add a pair of these inside them:

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/socks-gloves-mitts-hats-c151/gloves-c152/womens-forge-gloves-p12243

J
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quixoticgeek

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Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2021, 02:04:26 pm »
I've generally got on better with layering rather than one pair of very thick gloves.  I'm currently using Dissent 133, which is a system with four pairs - liner, warm layer, windproof and waterproof overgloves.  It's probably as good as anything else I've used. 

Warm hands is not only about gloves though - keeping core temperature up is also important (and more so if you have Reynauds).

Oh I do like the look of that. Tho it does appear they are out of stock until the end of July...


https://dissent133.com/products/dissent-133-ultimate-pack-3-layered-glove-system

J
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http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2021, 02:18:11 pm »
I've been very impressed with my Defeet Dura Wool gloves in temperatures down to freezing.  Normally I would have to wear at least two pairs of synthetic gloves (long finger riding gloves + windproof fleece outers) but the Dura Wool are just fine on their own, even in wet and windy conditions.  I reckon that with a thin liner for very cold weather and a shell glove/mitt for prolonged heavy rain they'd be perfect all winter.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2021, 02:22:30 pm »
There's a thread on the Dissent gloves here: https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=117604.0
Experiences seem mixed. Jiberjaber's comment seems pertinent, especially noting that DeFeet woollen gloves have already been mentioned in this thread.
Yes - I have a set from the original launch. (Oct 2017?)  They are OK but not really living up to the hype & price.  You still get cold fingers / hands with them...

You could probably make up a similar set yourself with defeet gloves, some silk liner gloves and then your water/windproof glove of choice as an over glove. 

That said, I am still using the woolen gloves (Defeet gloves branded Dissent) and the waterproof outers.

Whichever way you go, multiple silk liner gloves changed often is the way forward to comfort as they are light and take up little room plus a change of liner removes the cold damp part of the glove.

I've had a quick glance at the website and looks like they are using different materials for teh outershel now and the thermal inner (which was defeet) might be by a different supplier)
Faster than a walk, slower than a train, often slightly higher than a person. (David Byrne)

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2021, 02:29:55 pm »
I have two pairs of SP waterproof knit gloves (2nd pair were a free gift with another order), the previous wool version and the synthetic (Links below) they're both generally good.  Fairly warm, though not warm enough for the conditions in the OP.

Thanks, I’ve seen a few reviews suggesting they might not be warm enough, so I am still dithering. Still think the general idea of adding a shell might have merit, albeit with a different glove.