Author Topic: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???  (Read 4325 times)

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2021, 02:34:09 pm »
I already have a good selection of gloves, my favourites tend to only cover a narrow range of conditions, it's those that claim otherwise that have been most disappointing, I may take three pairs if I'm out all day and it's changeable.

Agreed. I have a 9l really useful box that contains gloves. Depending on the ride and the season depends what I take with me. But in my saddle bag there is always a pair of merino liner gloves, specifically:

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/socks-gloves-mitts-hats-c151/gloves-c152/womens-forge-gloves-p12243

In summer if there's a cold snap, i wear them under my normal mitts, This can be useful if You've gone up a big hill, and the descent turns out to be cold.

If it's a bit too cold for normal fingerless cycle mitts, then my next step up is a pair of these:

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/st-500-mountain-biking-gloves/_/R-p-301225

If I messed up the temp, I can always put the Merino liners in them to boost the warmth a little.

I tried this combo for my trip to Hell, but as I got further north, it wasn't warm enough, so I picked up a pair of:

https://www.specializedconceptstore.co.uk/product/14962/2019-element-1-0-gloves/

Tho I think it was the previous version. As I got even further north, I added the merino liners to boost it. I bought these out of necessity, they wouldn't be my first choice.

Fullfilling this roll instead now is a pair of "FWE Kennington Windproof Gloves" I got them on a trip to the UK when I got off the eurostar and realised that I'd left my gloves in Amsterdam, Evans was across the road from STP. They've been pretty good, better than the specialised. But I notice Evans don't sell them anymore.

By the time we're into October, I switch to the Altura's:

https://www.altura.co.uk/products/detail/AL18NWA/nightvision-4-waterproof-glove/?ng=157

They aren't waterproof, but they are pretty warm. And with the merino liners, they are pretty good for all day around barely positive temps, and without the liners ok for a training ride at about -2°C.

Then, when it gets really cold, when I'm also breaking out the cold avenger facemask (https://coldavenger.com/collections/face-masks/products/coldavenger-pro-softshell), then I put on the buffalo mitts:

http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/products/hi-vis-mitt/

And when it's even too cold for them alone, i add the merino liners. Which has been fine to -7°C, but I've not tried colder.

One of the advantages of the liner plus glove approach is if you stop and need dexterity, you can take the outer off, and still have some protection. But if it's cold, and you need dexterity, then the Mountain equipment G2 alpine glove is brilliant. I don't tend to use it for cycling, it's not padded right, and it's black*, but on the version I have (which unfortunately they don't make any more), the finger tip is such that you preserve almost all of your dexterity with them on. So much so I can do my shoe laces up while wearing them, something I can't do in any of my fingered gloves apart from the merino liners.

https://www.mountain-equipment.co.uk/collections/womens-head-hands-feet/products/g2-alpine-womens-glove

One thing to remember, and I covered this in my Arrivee article on winter cycling that came out last winter, when you take your gloves off, for any reason, put them inside your jersey or jacket. Do not put them down. There will be an amount of moisture in them from your sweat, and even 20 seconds of them not being on your body in cold temps, when you put them back on you'll have issues getting warmth back into them.

There is no one pair of gloves for all situations, it's a good idea to have a selection to choose from, don't be afraid to stick an extra pair one grade warmer, and maybe even a pair cooler in your saddle bag, and always carry the merino liners, they are brilliant.

J

Disclaimer: I bought all of the gloves mentioned above (and a few pairs that are too crap to even mention), all views my own, etc...

*Nearly all my gloves are hivis yellow with reflective details. I got fed up with motorists claiming I hadn't signalled when I clearly had, that I opted for this approach. Also means if I drop one when I stop in the dark, I can still find them. It's the closest I come to wearing hivis unless legally mandated to (thanks France).
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2021, 02:35:43 pm »
I usually resort to cheap skiing mitts.

Buy roomy enough that you can pull your thumb out of the thumb bit and tuck it in with the rest of your fingers. that makes a huge difference. (of course you can't brake while doing this so choose your road sections).
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2021, 03:50:57 pm »
If you want better value for money and ones that’s do their job then look at mountaineering gloves (or mitts which have a greater warmth to weight ratio).

Here’s some mitts to consider

https://www.montane.com/mens-c1/montane-extreme-mitts-p735 - This will see you from about 3C to -4C, £45

https://www.montane.com/mens-c1/montane-icarus-xt-mitts-p858#attribute%5B3%5D=13 , this will see you from about 0c to -10c, £75 so slightly above price range. Gauntlet style so comes up fore arm.


What you’ll often find is that gloves are snug around the fingers with little air to insulate.  With mitts you get a greater volume of air and shared heat. The fingers are less constricted and have better circulation.

I have other gloves / mitts in my mountaineering collection but these are the ones I’ve been using on the bike of late.

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2021, 04:04:23 pm »
Mitts and STI/Ergo/Di2 don’t, IME, mix very well. I don’t possess any bikes that are fixed/ss/ or that have bar end or downtube shifters. Plus I tend to brake with one or two fingers, so lobster gloves are the end of the line for me.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2021, 04:08:39 pm »
Mitts and STI/Ergo/Di2 don’t, IME, mix very well. I don’t possess any bikes that are fixed/ss/ or that have bar end or downtube shifters. Plus I tend to brake with one or two fingers, so lobster gloves are the end of the line for me.

The buffalo MIT's work fine with the tiagra 10 speed shifters. And fine with the TT bar di2 shifters


J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2021, 04:10:01 pm »
Mitts and STI/Ergo/Di2 don’t, IME, mix very well. I don’t possess any bikes that are fixed/ss/ or that have bar end or downtube shifters. Plus I tend to brake with one or two fingers, so lobster gloves are the end of the line for me.

The OP makes no mention of their shifting setup as far as I can see. When I had STI levers no probs using mitts but I agree other shifting arrangements are far better.

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #31 on: January 10, 2021, 04:39:32 pm »
I don't find shifting on Tiagra STIs easy with mitts, but manage ok.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #32 on: January 10, 2021, 05:00:21 pm »
After many years of experimentation, I determined that there are no gloves that are adequate in proper cold. 
Why isolate each tiny digit? Keep them together in mitts or pogies.

Buffalo mitts really are as good as the hype for keeping warm. But they are also very flexible so fine for brakes and shifters, especially as in winter conditions you are probably not pushing things to the limit. They have long cuffs - important to keep wrists warm, and available in hi-viz if needed. Lightweight, dry quickly, wind proof but not totally waterproof. Stick them up your jacket when you take them off.

Pogies are also great (HotPogs made in Nottingham of the sort of material Carradice use for saddlbags.)
But only for flat bar bikes.  I did buy some for drop bars but they made the bike uncontrollable in the slightest breeze.
You can wear gloves or mitts as well.

Disposable hand warmers (teabag type) work much better in mitts than gloves as you can get the heat where you need it - at your fingers. But I haven't needed them since I got the Buffalo mItts!

Brakes and shifters are so much easier on a flat-bar bike that you might consider using one in the winter if funds permit.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2021, 05:13:46 pm »

Buffalo mitts really are as good as the hype for keeping warm. But they are also very flexible so fine for brakes and shifters, especially as in winter conditions you are probably not pushing things to the limit. They have long cuffs - important to keep wrists warm, and available in hi-viz if needed. Lightweight, dry quickly, wind proof but not totally waterproof. Stick them up your jacket when you take them off.

Exactly, it's the flexibility they provide you, I've not found it in any other mitts.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #34 on: January 10, 2021, 05:51:08 pm »

Buffalo mitts really are as good as the hype for keeping warm. But they are also very flexible so fine for brakes and shifters, especially as in winter conditions you are probably not pushing things to the limit. They have long cuffs - important to keep wrists warm, and available in hi-viz if needed. Lightweight, dry quickly, wind proof but not totally waterproof. Stick them up your jacket when you take them off.

Exactly, it's the flexibility they provide you, I've not found it in any other mitts.

J

The montane ones are pretty good as they have a flexible pertex outer just like the Buffalo ones. Montane have also been a purveyor of pertex pile combinations for some time.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2021, 06:18:38 pm »
Mitts and STI/Ergo/Di2 don’t, IME, mix very well. I don’t possess any bikes that are fixed/ss/ or that have bar end or downtube shifters. Plus I tend to brake with one or two fingers, so lobster gloves are the end of the line for me.

The OP makes no mention of their shifting setup as far as I can see. When I had STI levers no probs using mitts but I agree other shifting arrangements are far better.
Isn't this going to depend to some extent on individual shifting and braking style? I tend to brake with index and middle finger, and shift with either one or the other of those two, depending on bar and shifter layout and whether I'm shifting up or down (on STIs), but if you habitually use all four fingers or only one (or maybe three?) then it could be different.

Flat bar controls do seem to be much easier in this respect.
Faster than a walk, slower than a train, often slightly higher than a person. (David Byrne)

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #36 on: January 10, 2021, 07:00:40 pm »
Mitts and STI/Ergo/Di2 don’t, IME, mix very well. I don’t possess any bikes that are fixed/ss/ or that have bar end or downtube shifters. Plus I tend to brake with one or two fingers, so lobster gloves are the end of the line for me.

The OP makes no mention of their shifting setup as far as I can see. When I had STI levers no probs using mitts but I agree other shifting arrangements are far better.
Isn't this going to depend to some extent on individual shifting and braking style? I tend to brake with index and middle finger, and shift with either one or the other of those two, depending on bar and shifter layout and whether I'm shifting up or down (on STIs), but if you habitually use all four fingers or only one (or maybe three?) then it could be different.

Flat bar controls do seem to be much easier in this respect.

What mitts were you wearing when you had problems with your STIs? Unless the mitt has a very stiff fabric you should be able to move individual fingers just fine when operating controls.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #37 on: January 10, 2021, 07:06:03 pm »
That's a question for rafletcher, not me, just to be clear.
Faster than a walk, slower than a train, often slightly higher than a person. (David Byrne)

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #38 on: January 10, 2021, 07:17:49 pm »
That's a question for rafletcher, not me, just to be clear.

I’m replying to your isn’t that going to depend post.  So assuming you also are speaking from experience.  Which all the mitt users so far, are.

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #39 on: January 10, 2021, 07:49:15 pm »
About 10 years ago when we had that really cold winter I borrowed some buffalo mitts from work and they were the only thing that I had tried that would keep my hands warm and yet still allow me to use brakes and gears.
Anyone who has buffalo mitts, how accurate did you find the sizing guide (someone with 19cm round the knuckles, so I guess 'medium')?
And if anyone has found a stockist with the hi viz ones in stock at the moment I'd be very grateful to know.

Thanks
Mike

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #40 on: January 10, 2021, 07:55:55 pm »
Mitts and STI/Ergo/Di2 don’t, IME, mix very well. I don’t possess any bikes that are fixed/ss/ or that have bar end or downtube shifters. Plus I tend to brake with one or two fingers, so lobster gloves are the end of the line for me.

The OP makes no mention of their shifting setup as far as I can see. When I had STI levers no probs using mitts but I agree other shifting arrangements are far better.
Isn't this going to depend to some extent on individual shifting and braking style? I tend to brake with index and middle finger, and shift with either one or the other of those two, depending on bar and shifter layout and whether I'm shifting up or down (on STIs), but if you habitually use all four fingers or only one (or maybe three?) then it could be different.

Flat bar controls do seem to be much easier in this respect.

I brake and shift as you do, so gloves or lobster fingers work for me, but mitts wouldn’t.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #41 on: January 10, 2021, 08:03:52 pm »
That's a question for rafletcher, not me, just to be clear.

I’m replying to your isn’t that going to depend post.  So assuming you also are speaking from experience.  Which all the mitt users so far, are.
Okay, I see your thinking. But no, I was wondering out loud. "Isn't that going to depend?" rather than "That's going to depend". Extrapolating from the observation that I sometimes use one, sometimes two fingers, but never all four, so if all four are moving together in one mitt, it's presumably going to alter the way I and others who shift with less than four fingers would use them.
Faster than a walk, slower than a train, often slightly higher than a person. (David Byrne)

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #42 on: January 10, 2021, 09:08:39 pm »
That's a question for rafletcher, not me, just to be clear.

I’m replying to your isn’t that going to depend post.  So assuming you also are speaking from experience.  Which all the mitt users so far, are.
Okay, I see your thinking. But no, I was wondering out loud. "Isn't that going to depend?" rather than "That's going to depend". Extrapolating from the observation that I sometimes use one, sometimes two fingers, but never all four, so if all four are moving together in one mitt, it's presumably going to alter the way I and others who shift with less than four fingers would use them.

You’re making the mistake of assuming a mitt constrains you to having to move all four at once. It does not, unless very stiff outer. Certainly no harder than thick gloves.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #43 on: January 10, 2021, 09:52:03 pm »
That's a question for rafletcher, not me, just to be clear.

I’m replying to your isn’t that going to depend post.  So assuming you also are speaking from experience.  Which all the mitt users so far, are.
Okay, I see your thinking. But no, I was wondering out loud. "Isn't that going to depend?" rather than "That's going to depend". Extrapolating from the observation that I sometimes use one, sometimes two fingers, but never all four, so if all four are moving together in one mitt, it's presumably going to alter the way I and others who shift with less than four fingers would use them.

You’re making the mistake of assuming a mitt constrains you to having to move all four at once. It does not, unless very stiff outer. Certainly no harder than thick gloves.
Well, that's kind of why I was doing the wondering out loud. And, probably relevant to mitts v gloves but not necessarily to warmth of hands, I (personal experience now!) find the feeling of having a little bit of unfilled finger (ie the finger of the glove is longer than my finger – this only happens IME when putting gloves on wet or damp hands and the inner sticks) really annoying.
Faster than a walk, slower than a train, often slightly higher than a person. (David Byrne)

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #44 on: January 10, 2021, 10:10:39 pm »
Supplies of Buffalo mitts always seems a bit hit and miss.
Been trying to buy a pair for OH so he doesn't keep pinching mine.
Could not find the hi-viz ones anywhere.
I've just ordered Black medium from Outdoor GB - not used them before, so fingers crossed.
Top price, sad to say.
Previous pair were from AbsoluteSnow - on discount and very fast delivery, but don't have what I want this time

As L Phil says, you can actually use fingers independently as the mitts are so flexible (I have quite severe arthritis in my hands).
And as the owner of wide hands and stubby fingers, I really agree with the comment about finger length on gloves being annoying...

fd3

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #45 on: January 10, 2021, 11:22:12 pm »
Every year I suffer worse with the cold and find myself using winter gloves for longer.  PX Lobster mitts are a right bargain - they don't have a removable liner and they have the feature (design flaw) that the inner is actually a glove so fingers can't huddle together for warmth.
Looks like I will spend most of winter in lockdown, but in 2022 I shall buy some mitts - so thanks for all the advice!
And we know the flag of love is from above/And we can force you to be free

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #46 on: January 11, 2021, 01:19:13 am »
We never got on terribly well with layering - I say 'we' as it's Mr Smith's hands controlling the bike I'm on!
If you have big hands then you may struggle to get gloves big enough to layer successfully.
I paid a lot of money for his gloves (there's an old thread somewhere describing which models I went for) but not Rapha money - that's ridiculous.

This one?

https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=77214.msg1582657#msg1582657

It's 8 years old now - no idea if those gloves are available now.

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #47 on: January 11, 2021, 02:46:37 am »
Thank you for all the great replies folks sounds like I'm not the only one suffering with cold hands.  :thumbsup:

I think I've actually got something like the Altura Night Vision but a different model but I've also got a pair of silk like gloves (a Lidls buy) which I could layer with the Altura, and they just about fit. Maybe I'll give that a try before forking out. Many people mentioned Motorcycle Handlebar Muffs but not sure the I like the idea of this on a bicycle. I used to use them when motorcycling in the depths of winter so know they can be good though at the speeds I was going at, and temps I was riding in I still needed heated grips and even then my hands were only barely warm.
The lobster claws just don't win me over, it's that look. Someone mentioned wearing up to 4 layers, called Dissent 133, now that sounds very interesting and it's something I'd be interested in. Like the idea you can layer up according to the conditions, brilliant and they are designed to work together. Being able to buy the individual layers separately when the inners get worn out sounds great. Well if the inners combined with my Altura's don't work out then I'm going to have to have a serious look at the Dissent's.
Heated gel pads won't work for me as it's the tips of my fingers that seem to suffer. I've looked at the Grip Grab but again it looked like you'd have to pay almost Rapha price to get something decent.
The other top suggestion for me anyway would either be the Montane Extreme Mitts or Buffalo mitts, not sure how well these would stand up to the rain but I imagine could be waterproofed easily as few seams. As they are a mitt it would also be easy to wear a silk liner if need be and the fact the fingers are not separated means they'd be warmer. My gears are twist & trigger shifter on respective bikes and I'm sure I could adapt if required, any thoughts would be appreciated, brakes are straight handlebar type.


Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2021, 07:45:20 am »
You don't waterproof buffalo mitts - quite honestly, they are best not waterproofed. For the days when it is siling down, I have a pair of waterproof mountaineers overmitts. Absolutely huge, they are meant to go over thick gloves.

Best place for buying buffalo mitts is Needle Sports https://www.needlesports.com/Catalogue/Clothing-Footwear/Technical-Clothing/PertexPile-Systems-Buffalo/Buffalo-DP-Mitts

I have a so-called summer buffalo sleeping bag - it has been ok for me down to sub-zero temp (I wear a montane pertex and fleece jacket inside it at those temps).

Pertex and pile is a bit of a change in mindset. If I could justify the expense, I'd buy a full set of the gear.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Gloves capable of coping with freezing conditions???
« Reply #49 on: January 11, 2021, 02:52:52 pm »
Worth keeping an eye on the Reynauds Soc  (SRUK - the uk site, not the USA one that will pop up if you google)

At least they recognise that giving up cycling and sitting in front of the fire is not an option!!
Basic info that you should already know:
https://www.sruk.co.uk/raynauds/managing-raynauds/raynauds-and-sport

But for you macho folks - note the bit about getting severly cold (frostbite) can trigger Reynaulds. 
And if it does, you will regret it for the rest of your days.
https://www.sruk.co.uk/raynauds/managing-raynauds/raynauds-and-cycling/