Author Topic: Tales from the Lock-Down  (Read 20572 times)

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #525 on: May 26, 2020, 07:19:21 am »
Yes, it's noticeable around here that a large number of the new cyclists ride on the pavements, while a similar percentage of new walkers occupy the middle of the roads and avoid the pavements - not, I think, because of the cyclists but because they think there won't be any traffic.

On a slightly different tack, there has been much talk and understandable, if opportunistic, exhortation about "pop-up" cycle facilities and improvements to cycle routes while the traffic was/is less intense.  Has anyone seen any single piece of evidence of this kind of thing happening - anywhere?

It's happened in a couple of London boroughs that I'm aware of.

There was the promise from the government of money for local authorities to facilitate these changes.... but, surprise, surprise, nowt has been forthcoming from Whitehall.
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #526 on: May 26, 2020, 08:49:55 am »
Was crossing York's Millennium Bridge yesterday.  Crowd density was getting like a rock festival.  Lots of gardenless houses nearby.
Sic transit and all that..

Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #527 on: May 26, 2020, 09:45:25 am »
Was crossing York's Millennium Bridge yesterday.  Crowd density was getting like a rock festival.  Lots of gardenless houses nearby.

Yup, it's been like that every sunny day for the past couple of weeks. Not easy to socially distance on the bridge itself, definitely.

meddyg

  • 'You'll have had your tea?'
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #528 on: May 26, 2020, 12:52:36 pm »
Cardiff has initiated a new cycle lane in front of the Castle; it looks very temporary - a line of cones, and temporary blue/pedestrian cycling signs. An older couple were coming the wrong way' down the lane. They might still paint a pedestrian on the pavement bit and a squashed bicycle on the road - it's a start at least.

I can cycle across Cardiff in bus lanes and pretend it's 1960 ...

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #529 on: May 26, 2020, 01:09:16 pm »
We've just had a town turnout for a luminary who died a week ago. Main street lined, the Silver Band playing, applause as his hearse stopped outside his shop.

Far more than will be able to be at the graveside.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #530 on: May 26, 2020, 04:06:17 pm »

I think the supermarkets may still be getting the hang of their stock control, just been to AH and noticed a lot of stuff is on offer, esp preserved stuff in jars. Annoyingly they had already sold out of the pickled beetroot I was actually looking to buy.

On the plus side, saved me nearly 20% off my shop.

J

--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #531 on: Yesterday at 08:25:19 am »
I think the supermarkets may still be getting the hang of their stock control

It's noticeable in my local Tesco that they have rationalised the range in some sections, so eg instead of 20 different types of spaghetti, you have huge quantities of just one type.

The tinned soups and beans are also notably abundant.

It's like they've worked out it's better to give people what they actually want rather than trying to sell them the myth of choice.

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #532 on: Yesterday at 09:29:14 am »
Yeah, most choice is in fact 'faux choice.' I read an article years ago about the fact that so many of these different brands were basically all made in the same factories with minimal recipe/industrial process changes. The vaunted choice of the local giant supermarket is actually not that much more than a modest high street shop. The shelf space in a bigger store is taken up with brands of the same products. We're just buying our favourite packaging.

I remember when I moved to the US – the cavernous local Big Y had a huge aisle, probably long enough to land the Space Shuttle down, completely dedicated to bagels. US bagels aren't edible, unless fresh, they're just some kind of vulcanized bread-derived product that make a reasonable hockey puck replacement.
!nataS pihsroW

robgul

  • Cycle:End-to-End webmaster
  • . . cyclist, Cytech accredited
    • Cycle:End-to-End
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #533 on: Yesterday at 09:45:19 am »
I think the supermarkets may still be getting the hang of their stock control

It's noticeable in my local Tesco that they have rationalised the range in some sections, so eg instead of 20 different types of spaghetti, you have huge quantities of just one type.

The tinned soups and beans are also notably abundant.

It's like they've worked out it's better to give people what they actually want rather than trying to sell them the myth of choice.

I understand that Tesco rationalised sausages from 64 options to "just" 15 at the start of the mad buying crisis.

Rob

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #534 on: Yesterday at 09:54:39 am »
Yeah, most choice is in fact 'faux choice.' I read an article years ago about the fact that so many of these different brands were basically all made in the same factories with minimal recipe/industrial process changes. The vaunted choice of the local giant supermarket is actually not that much more than a modest high street shop. The shelf space in a bigger store is taken up with brands of the same products. We're just buying our favourite packaging.

I'm in this business.
Sometimes, you're buying exactly the same. Tesco Wine Route = Isla Negra.
If there's a recipe, you're not. 'Brand' recipes are licensed. They're made in the same factory, but the recipe is different. If there is any way to make it cheaper, it will be. Even the difference between Haywards Pickled Onions and Morrison's pickled onions. The spec for the onions is wider, the recipe is cheaper (more syrup, less sugar, more water, less vinegar) and the spice mix is much cheaper- usually through flavour chemicals rather than actual spices. All the packaging is cheaper, cheaper glass, cheaper (less branding) closures, fewer colours in the labels, more generic cases.
Don't get me wrong, I'm always pushing Mr Smith to buy Malt Wheats rather than Shreddies, but I'm not kidding myself they are the same. They very rarely are, as soon as there's any processing. I have no idea why anyone buys Bero flour, though.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #535 on: Yesterday at 10:03:49 am »
Hadn't heard of Bero flour. Someone on ebay is selling 1.1kg for £4.29.  :o

I understand that Tesco rationalised sausages from 64 options to "just" 15 at the start of the mad buying crisis.

Rob
Appropriate phrase.

The vaunted choice of the local giant supermarket is actually not that much more than a modest high street shop.
Which also has (to me) a much more pleasant, less intimidating/scary (in this fear-filled times) atmosphere. As well as being so much quicker to shop in and get to.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #536 on: Yesterday at 10:38:05 am »
Yeah, most choice is in fact 'faux choice.' I read an article years ago about the fact that so many of these different brands were basically all made in the same factories with minimal recipe/industrial process changes. The vaunted choice of the local giant supermarket is actually not that much more than a modest high street shop. The shelf space in a bigger store is taken up with brands of the same products. We're just buying our favourite packaging.

I'm in this business.
Sometimes, you're buying exactly the same. Tesco Wine Route = Isla Negra.
If there's a recipe, you're not. 'Brand' recipes are licensed. They're made in the same factory, but the recipe is different. If there is any way to make it cheaper, it will be. Even the difference between Haywards Pickled Onions and Morrison's pickled onions. The spec for the onions is wider, the recipe is cheaper (more syrup, less sugar, more water, less vinegar) and the spice mix is much cheaper- usually through flavour chemicals rather than actual spices. All the packaging is cheaper, cheaper glass, cheaper (less branding) closures, fewer colours in the labels, more generic cases.
Don't get me wrong, I'm always pushing Mr Smith to buy Malt Wheats rather than Shreddies, but I'm not kidding myself they are the same. They very rarely are, as soon as there's any processing. I have no idea why anyone buys Bero flour, though.

This reminds me of the day I compared the ingredients and traffic lights on a tine of Morrisons "Reduced Salt" Baked beans with a tin of normal Heinz.
It should be no surprise that the Morrisons Beans had twice as much salt in it as the Heinz.

Which leads into the "worse options easier to buy for less money" stuff

Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #537 on: Yesterday at 11:22:34 am »
I did a Christmas holidays stint in Parrs pork pie factory one year. I was on the stuffing line mostly.

Exactly the same stuffing went into Sainsbury's, Tesco and A N Other (can''t remember which) packaging.

But not M&S, standards at Parrs weren't good enough.
Rust never sleeps

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #538 on: Yesterday at 02:48:24 pm »
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #539 on: Yesterday at 03:04:00 pm »
Yeah, most choice is in fact 'faux choice.' I read an article years ago about the fact that so many of these different brands were basically all made in the same factories with minimal recipe/industrial process changes. The vaunted choice of the local giant supermarket is actually not that much more than a modest high street shop. The shelf space in a bigger store is taken up with brands of the same products. We're just buying our favourite packaging.

I'm in this business.
Sometimes, you're buying exactly the same. Tesco Wine Route = Isla Negra.
If there's a recipe, you're not. 'Brand' recipes are licensed. They're made in the same factory, but the recipe is different. If there is any way to make it cheaper, it will be. Even the difference between Haywards Pickled Onions and Morrison's pickled onions. The spec for the onions is wider, the recipe is cheaper (more syrup, less sugar, more water, less vinegar) and the spice mix is much cheaper- usually through flavour chemicals rather than actual spices. All the packaging is cheaper, cheaper glass, cheaper (less branding) closures, fewer colours in the labels, more generic cases.
Don't get me wrong, I'm always pushing Mr Smith to buy Malt Wheats rather than Shreddies, but I'm not kidding myself they are the same. They very rarely are, as soon as there's any processing. I have no idea why anyone buys Bero flour, though.

my wife actually prefers the own brand Waitrose chocolate digestives to the McVities, I have no idea if they are actually different or not, and don't eat enough of them to care.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #540 on: Yesterday at 03:32:18 pm »
Lots of stuff nearly the same in a supermarket.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uexC5wK9rM
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #541 on: Yesterday at 03:50:05 pm »

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #542 on: Yesterday at 04:01:03 pm »
This reminds me of the day I compared the ingredients and traffic lights on a tine of Morrisons "Reduced Salt" Baked beans with a tin of normal Heinz.
It should be no surprise that the Morrisons Beans had twice as much salt in it as the Heinz.

When I was a penniless student oaf, I wrote a feature for the rag comparing the price of a standard shopping basket in the local emporia. Back in those days, one of the favourites was Giant in Kirkstall - a proper pile-it-high-sell-it-cheap place. They sold tins of tomato soup for something like 6p, which was cheap even in the early 90s. Of course, if you took the trouble to investigate the ingredients list, you would see that its tomato content was precisely fuck all.

Some brands really are worth paying more for. My wife complains when I buy Plenty kitchen paper because of the price but I keep telling her the cheap stuff she gets from Aldi is shit and you need a whole roll to wipe up the tiniest spillage.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #543 on: Yesterday at 04:04:00 pm »
Hadn't heard of Bero flour.

The mere mention of Bero gives me a Proustian moment. We had a Bero cookbook when I was a kid, which contained the best ever chocolate cake recipe - it was my signature dish for many years.

I found the recipe on the internet a while ago and tried making it again for nostalgia's sake. My god! It was awful... unbearably sweet.

Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #544 on: Yesterday at 04:33:22 pm »
Went to Tesco for the first time in 6-8weeks; ~1pm.  Queued for ~30mins to get in.   All pretty good, though no lemons at all, and 1 bag of any flour type left; organic spelt, which I nabbed.  Apparently flour delivery everyday, and people limited to three bags.
Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.  EOW.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #545 on: Yesterday at 09:38:24 pm »
I'm in this business.
Sometimes, you're buying exactly the same. Tesco Wine Route = Isla Negra.
If there's a recipe, you're not. 'Brand' recipes are licensed. They're made in the same factory, but the recipe is different. If there is any way to make it cheaper, it will be. Even the difference between Haywards Pickled Onions and Morrison's pickled onions. The spec for the onions is wider, the recipe is cheaper (more syrup, less sugar, more water, less vinegar) and the spice mix is much cheaper- usually through flavour chemicals rather than actual spices. All the packaging is cheaper, cheaper glass, cheaper (less branding) closures, fewer colours in the labels, more generic cases.
Don't get me wrong, I'm always pushing Mr Smith to buy Malt Wheats rather than Shreddies, but I'm not kidding myself they are the same. They very rarely are, as soon as there's any processing. I have no idea why anyone buys Bero flour, though.

You soon learn this when you start having to check ingredients for allergy/intolerance/veganism reasons.  Own brands, in particular, are notorious for sneaking whey powder into things without any obvious sign that the recipe may have changed.

I've been reading a lot of ingredients lists since the Mad Buying Crisis (at arms length, because I'm wearing riding-to-the-shop-and-spotting-things-on-shelves glasses and trying not to touch my face), as the usual brands aren't always available.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Tales from the Lock-Down
« Reply #546 on: Yesterday at 09:47:51 pm »
I've been reading a lot of ingredients lists since the Mad Buying Crisis (at arms length, because I'm wearing riding-to-the-shop-and-spotting-things-on-shelves glasses and trying not to touch my face), as the usual brands aren't always available.
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Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...