Author Topic: Preppers and prepping tendencies  (Read 11020 times)

Re: Preppers and prepping tendencies
« Reply #150 on: May 04, 2020, 02:55:35 pm »
This thread's making me feel under-armed.  (Not in the deodorant sense.)


Heinnie's will meet all of your stabby / choppy requirements.   You can supplement your Mora with a machete or axe......  https://www.heinnie.com       (The Marbles Bolo I bought was very sharp out of the box , but is very ORANGE).


I keep Percy the Precautionary Pickaxe Handle in my hall,  for a less lethal response....       
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Morat

  • I tried to HTFU but something went ping :(
Re: Preppers and prepping tendencies
« Reply #151 on: May 09, 2020, 05:27:50 pm »
I Thought you were all going a bit nuts with the weaponry, until I remembered my 12 bore. I don't normally even see it between Feb 1st and mid November...

I've given in and found a large bag of Strong White Flour, one of Strong Wholemeal Flower and bought two of these food tubs to keep it all in.
If there's a second lockdown, I'll be ready.

In the meantime we're bakers. We haven't bought a single pre-baked item since the lockdown began - home made just tastes better. If we had the time during "normality" I'd keep on baking.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07JHCV1NR/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Proper job!
Tandem Stoker, CX bike abuser (slicks and tarmac) and owner of a sadly neglected MTB.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Preppers and prepping tendencies
« Reply #152 on: May 17, 2020, 07:04:46 pm »
Interesting read here on optimism, selfishness and altruism in prepping communities as well as their rejection of survivalism. Also raises the issue of prepping for what happens when you come out of the bunker – but then frustratingly doesn't explore it.
Quote
Nestled among Kansas cornfields in a landscape devoid of any noticeable natural topography, a verdant mound can be seen from a dirt road. Surrounded by a military-grade chain fence and in the shadow of a large wind turbine, a security guard in camouflage paces the fence line with an assault rifle. If you look closely, you might notice what looks like a concrete pill box perched on the top of the small hill, flanked by cameras. What lies underneath is a bunker that is unassuming, unassailable and – to many – unbelievable.
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...

Re: Preppers and prepping tendencies
« Reply #153 on: May 17, 2020, 07:41:01 pm »
Interesting read here on optimism, selfishness and altruism in prepping communities as well as their rejection of survivalism.
Quote
Nestled among Kansas cornfields in a landscape devoid of any noticeable natural topography, a verdant mound can be seen from a dirt road. Surrounded by a military-grade chain fence and in the shadow of a large wind turbine, a security guard in camouflage paces the fence line with an assault rifle. If you look closely, you might notice what looks like a concrete pill box perched on the top of the small hill, flanked by cameras. What lies underneath is a bunker that is unassuming, unassailable and – to many – unbelievable.


Sounds like a great setting for a J.G. Ballard novel.   
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Preppers and prepping tendencies
« Reply #154 on: May 17, 2020, 08:14:55 pm »
Interesting read here on optimism, selfishness and altruism in prepping communities as well as their rejection of survivalism. Also raises the issue of prepping for what happens when you come out of the bunker – but then frustratingly doesn't explore it.
Quote
Nestled among Kansas cornfields in a landscape devoid of any noticeable natural topography, a verdant mound can be seen from a dirt road. Surrounded by a military-grade chain fence and in the shadow of a large wind turbine, a security guard in camouflage paces the fence line with an assault rifle. If you look closely, you might notice what looks like a concrete pill box perched on the top of the small hill, flanked by cameras. What lies underneath is a bunker that is unassuming, unassailable and – to many – unbelievable.

I wonder if they remembered the hair clippers...

Reading the article I notice no mention of health care. No infirmary, no morgue. Imagine locking yourselves in a 75 person village for 5 years, to sit out the apocalypse, then discovering 4 months down the line someone has had a heart attack, and you have nowhere to put the decomposing body without opening the hatches.

What happens if someone has a child in there? What about all the complications of pregnancy? Do they have anyone trained as a midwife, or are they relying on a some book in the basement library?

Kinda want them all to scramble into the bunker, and then watch it as an experiment... See how many of the 75 people who go in, can make it out in 5 years...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Preppers and prepping tendencies
« Reply #155 on: May 17, 2020, 10:14:40 pm »
Interesting read here on optimism, selfishness and altruism in prepping communities as well as their rejection of survivalism.
Quote
Nestled among Kansas cornfields in a landscape devoid of any noticeable natural topography, a verdant mound can be seen from a dirt road. Surrounded by a military-grade chain fence and in the shadow of a large wind turbine, a security guard in camouflage paces the fence line with an assault rifle. If you look closely, you might notice what looks like a concrete pill box perched on the top of the small hill, flanked by cameras. What lies underneath is a bunker that is unassuming, unassailable and – to many – unbelievable.


Sounds like a great setting for a J.G. Ballard novel.

I think he kind of covered that in his first novel, The Wind From Nowhere. It doesn't end well...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_from_Nowhere (contains plot spoilers, obv.)
"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster.
And when you look long into an abyss, the abyss also looks into you." ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
Re: Preppers and prepping tendencies
« Reply #156 on: May 18, 2020, 11:30:24 am »
Interesting read here on optimism, selfishness and altruism in prepping communities as well as their rejection of survivalism. Also raises the issue of prepping for what happens when you come out of the bunker – but then frustratingly doesn't explore it.
Quote
Nestled among Kansas cornfields in a landscape devoid of any noticeable natural topography, a verdant mound can be seen from a dirt road. Surrounded by a military-grade chain fence and in the shadow of a large wind turbine, a security guard in camouflage paces the fence line with an assault rifle. If you look closely, you might notice what looks like a concrete pill box perched on the top of the small hill, flanked by cameras. What lies underneath is a bunker that is unassuming, unassailable and – to many – unbelievable.

I wonder if they remembered the hair clippers...

Reading the article I notice no mention of health care. No infirmary, no morgue. Imagine locking yourselves in a 75 person village for 5 years, to sit out the apocalypse, then discovering 4 months down the line someone has had a heart attack, and you have nowhere to put the decomposing body without opening the hatches.

What happens if someone has a child in there? What about all the complications of pregnancy? Do they have anyone trained as a midwife, or are they relying on a some book in the basement library?

Kinda want them all to scramble into the bunker, and then watch it as an experiment... See how many of the 75 people who go in, can make it out in 5 years...

J
There's a lot of things they don't mention. Toilets for instance. Do they have a septic tank large enough for five years or do they somehow get it all to soak into the surrounding soil? Or perhaps they have a system where the pee is filtered and sterilised and ends up as clean water (cos they don't mention that either) and the poo is dried and ends up as fuel? But these are technical questions and pretty easy to solve (probably) if you've got $20 million to spend, and a bit dry (not literally... ) for an article that's not about the technical details.

Harder to do is the staff (medical, engineering, etc; are they retaining medics, electricians, plumbers, or just hoping there will be some among the residents? And the social aspects, which he has thought about, but some (same people) you obviously just have to put up with.

And then what will that live feed show on five years plus one day and what will you do upon surfacing?
Days become simply the spaces between dreams, spaces between the shifting floors of time...