Author Topic: Spelling that makes you cringe  (Read 61483 times)

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2010, 12:20:38 pm »
The senior people at work who are "Principle Engineers" or "Principle Consultants".

*snigger*
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

CAMRAMan

  • Formerly A Warwickshire Lad
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2010, 12:25:55 pm »
I defiantly do not like that one...
Haggerty F, Haggerty R, Tomkins, Noble, Carrick, Robson, Crapper, Dewhurst, Macintyre, Treadmore, Davitt.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2010, 12:26:51 pm »
Not sure I ever met a Consultant with principles ;)
Getting there...

red marley

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2010, 12:27:32 pm »
The senior people at work who are "Principle Engineers" or "Principle Consultants".

*snigger*

Maybe you should contact one of the Principle Consultants and tell them that you have a rule to guide your approach problems but you are not sure if it is a tenet, axiom or principle. Could they help? If that proves too difficult, you could ask one of the Principle Engineers to construct your rule in such a way that it is guaranteed to be a principle.

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #29 on: September 23, 2010, 12:39:27 pm »
I did say something along the lines of "Is that like Social Engineering?". The whooshing noise was deafening.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #30 on: September 23, 2010, 12:52:54 pm »
I'm inconsistent and fallible. Like others I admit to being somewhat pedantic about spelling and grammar. Yet no matter how much I proof read my letters/emails etc. it makes me cringe when I see what I've written. So I try (weakly) to assume the errors of others are typos or slips of the keyboard.

On this site I get irritated by
- peddles instead of pedals, and

- breaks instead of brakes.

There, I've said it now; that feels better already.
Ah yes. Indeedy. Now I don't have to mention them.

Spelling can also be a source of hilarity. Isn't that right No2Daughter? Flower, eggs, oboegeen, bluebries, sewing stake. This is why she is the list maker, it's much more entertaining than the real thing. I almost get disappointed when she gets them right after only one correction.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #31 on: September 23, 2010, 09:26:51 pm »
When I was a kid one of my best friends was called Laury. The first time I ever wrote his name (on a birthday card) I spelled it Lorry. That made him laugh.  :D
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Steve Kish

  • World's No. 1 moaner about the weather.
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #32 on: September 23, 2010, 10:00:18 pm »
I once heard a story about the obituary of a WW1 war hero printed by a local paper.  Wounded in many campaigns, due to a typo, he was described as 'battle-scared'.

After his furious widow threatened court action. the paper printed a grovelling apology taking full responsibility for the typo and concluding that '...of course, this should have read 'bottle-scarred' ...'   :D
Old enough to know better!

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #33 on: September 23, 2010, 10:05:53 pm »
I noticed that a review in C+ recently of a new saddle talked about how it relieved pressure in the perennial area.
Getting there...

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #34 on: September 23, 2010, 10:09:58 pm »
Which reminds me of the old one about paying 'per anum'.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Eccentrica Gallumbits

  • Rock 'n' roll and brew, rock 'n' roll and brew...
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2010, 10:22:15 pm »


On this site I get irritated by
- peddles instead of pedals, and

- breaks instead of brakes.

Me too. And curb instead of kerb.

And non-cycling-related, phase and faze are not the same.
My feminist marxist dialectic brings all the boys to the yard.


Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2010, 11:14:42 pm »
But where would we all be without Fatfingers?
   FatFingers - eBay typos, misspelling & spelling mistakes
? ? ? There is almost no article you can think of that someone has not screwed up the spelling in their online listing.

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #37 on: September 24, 2010, 06:33:40 am »
Not a spelling mistake as such, but a Trading Standards woman on "Watchdog"* used "disinterested" last night when she meant "uninterested".  That confusion is so common; more people get it wrong than get it right.


*I know, I'm sorry...but Nicky Campbell seems to have left, which makes it more tolerable.
Never tell me the odds.

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #38 on: September 24, 2010, 08:52:52 am »
I've always thought the grammar thread showed little enough class or manners, but I stayed away away from that argument, but here you all go again. Heaven forbid that there should be people out there oh so slightly less literate than than the middle class morass that fills yacf. What's the matter with you all, why not live and let live?


Are the middle classes so very literate?  Do they form a forum morass?
Sic transit and all that..

red marley

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #39 on: September 24, 2010, 08:53:31 am »
Not a spelling mistake as such, but a Trading Standards woman on "Watchdog" used "disinterested" last night when she meant "uninterested".  That confusion is so common; more people get it wrong than get it right.

Has anyone here ever used the term 'stakeholder'? While many cringe at its jargonistic usage, what seems more problematic is its meaning is almost exactly the opposite of its intended use. A stakeholder is, by definition, a disinterested party - someone who holds the stake in a bet and has no interest in a particular outcome.

rower40

  • Not my boat. Now sold.
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #40 on: September 24, 2010, 09:00:19 am »
Pet hate: the omission of the last two letters from "drawer".

E.g. "Top draw of the filing cabinet"
Be Naughty; save Santa a trip

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #41 on: September 24, 2010, 09:06:44 am »
Slightly off topic because kids' mis-spellings aren't cringeworthy: they are often delightful.

I once had a very exciting story to mark, written by an 8-year-old, which was set in Africa. All kinds of creatures appeared, but my favourite was the austridge.

On another occasion, a colleague and I were responsible for teaching maths to some very challenged 11/12 year olds. We set some homework one day and the following week one lad appeared with a picture of the world's tallest land mammal that he's drawn and a letter from his mum along the lines that she couldn't see what this had to do with mathematics.

We had told them all to draw a graph.
Homo sapiens - a creature so intelligent it knowingly sowed the seeds of its own destruction and did nothing about it.

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #42 on: September 24, 2010, 09:09:55 am »
Not a spelling mistake as such, but a Trading Standards woman on "Watchdog" used "disinterested" last night when she meant "uninterested".  That confusion is so common; more people get it wrong than get it right.

Has anyone here ever used the term 'stakeholder'? While many cringe at its jargonistic usage, what seems more problematic is its meaning is almost exactly the opposite of its intended use. A stakeholder is, by definition, a disinterested party - someone who holds the stake in a bet and has no interest in a particular outcome.
I don't think I've ever heard stakeholder used in that way. Does it have any application outside gambling? Perhaps it could be used to refer to a person or body that holds cautionary deposits - but I don't think it ever is.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2010, 09:15:26 am »
I noticed that a review in C+ recently of a new saddle talked about how it relieved pressure in the perennial area.

While we're on that particular area, what about blokes who have problems with their [sic] prostrate?

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #44 on: September 24, 2010, 09:22:15 am »
While we're on that particular area, what about blokes who have problems with their [sic] prostrate?
I think you meant to type:
blokes who have problems when their* prostrate.

Hope this helps.


[*short for they are, innit?]
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

red marley

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #45 on: September 24, 2010, 09:23:41 am »
I don't think I've ever heard stakeholder used in that way. Does it have any application outside gambling? Perhaps it could be used to refer to a person or body that holds cautionary deposits - but I don't think it ever is.

(Some) lawyers use it routinely. If it wasn't for its widespread misuse I think it could have been a helpful word in everyday language.

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #46 on: September 24, 2010, 10:14:18 am »
We use stakeholder at work quite a lot for people who have an interest in or will be affected by something but who are not directly part of the contract. In our case this often means the people who will end up using our systems but who don't specify or pay for them.

S
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #47 on: September 24, 2010, 10:20:00 am »
Not a spelling mistake as such, but a Trading Standards woman on "Watchdog" used "disinterested" last night when she meant "uninterested".  That confusion is so common; more people get it wrong than get it right.

Has anyone here ever used the term 'stakeholder'? While many cringe at its jargonistic usage, what seems more problematic is its meaning is almost exactly the opposite of its intended use. A stakeholder is, by definition, a disinterested party - someone who holds the stake in a bet and has no interest in a particular outcome.

When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean--neither more nor less."

Sic transit and all that..

CAMRAMan

  • Formerly A Warwickshire Lad
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #48 on: September 24, 2010, 11:04:36 am »
Have we had "lightening" for "lightning" yet?
Haggerty F, Haggerty R, Tomkins, Noble, Carrick, Robson, Crapper, Dewhurst, Macintyre, Treadmore, Davitt.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Spelling that makes you cringe
« Reply #49 on: September 24, 2010, 12:04:11 pm »
Have we had "lightening" for "lightning" yet?
God yes, that one's appalling.
 :-[

Thunderbolts and Lightening very very frightening
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!