Author Topic: Snowpics  (Read 13088 times)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Snowpics
« Reply #100 on: February 03, 2011, 08:54:58 am »
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Mind you, I don't think even my snow tyres could have coped with that.
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fungus

  • SO @ T
    • Tamworth cycling club
Re: Snowpics
« Reply #101 on: February 10, 2011, 04:42:44 pm »
A few from my Snowdon walk last March  :)


Snowdon range from Llynnau Mymbyr.


Crib Goch.


Trig point at summit.
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Re: Snowpics
« Reply #102 on: March 06, 2011, 10:18:36 pm »


My brother sent me this photo this morning. His words:

Quote
Here's a remarkable thing; this disc of ice, c 2m across, was rotating slowly and steadily in the brook. I have a rather jerky video but it's too big to attach to an email

We saw my uncle today and he gave me a copy of said video. It was 195.6MB coz his camera took it at 720p ;D Now on YouTube at:

YouTube - Rotating ice disc

The video isn't jerky - my guess is that his computer just wasn't up to playing every frame.

Re: Snowpics
« Reply #103 on: March 06, 2011, 10:29:20 pm »
Far out!

Re: Snowpics
« Reply #104 on: March 06, 2011, 10:34:53 pm »
A frozen whirlpool amazing !
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Rhys W

  • I'm single, bilingual
    • Cardiff Ajax
Re: Snowpics
« Reply #105 on: March 07, 2011, 11:30:21 am »
Interesting that Dez's youtube video has many examples of the same phenomenon in the "related" column!

The only think I can't understand about it is how does the ice break free into an almost perfect disk? The only thing I can think of is the depression in the centre of a whirlpool coupled with faster flowing water at the outer edge would wear away/melt the ice at the outer edge much faster than at the centre. Interesting.

Re: Snowpics
« Reply #106 on: May 11, 2011, 05:03:48 am »




This is the deposition from an avalanche that ran a few miles from my house on Saturday afternoon, 7 May. For those of you who know Colorado, this happened next to Interstate 70, between Frisco and Copper Mountain ski area. The flat topped mound of snow on the right side of the second picture is the bicycle path from Frisco to Copper Mountain Ski Area and onward to Vail Pass. It might be a while before it's rideable this year...

This area is fairly deep in the canyon and west facing, so it gets very little sun all winter long, so very little of this winter's snowfall had melted. We had a series of heavy, wet snowstorms at the end of April to pile on a last good load of snow, then things finally warmed up a few days before this happened. A few days of warm temperature to melt the snow and lubricate the ground underneath the snow, some strong sun all day Saturday that finally loosened up the snow, and here's the result.

Rhys W

  • I'm single, bilingual
    • Cardiff Ajax
Re: Snowpics
« Reply #107 on: May 11, 2011, 10:38:05 am »
I went to Keystone for a conference years ago. I took a mountain bike with me and after 3 days acclimatising over the conference I spent 10 days exploring the area, based in a motel in Frisco. I'd get a stack of pancakes with blueberries and head off for most of the day. I had one epic day when I went over one of the highest passes in the area, Looking down on Breckenridge and just mountaintops everywhere in the distance. There were large pockets of snow there, in August.

That was a great couple of weeks - thanks for reminding me!

Re: Snowpics
« Reply #108 on: May 11, 2011, 10:42:55 am »


My brother sent me this photo this morning. His words:

Quote
Here's a remarkable thing; this disc of ice, c 2m across, was rotating slowly and steadily in the brook. I have a rather jerky video but it's too big to attach to an email

Cool (no pun intended).

Due to friction, the water nearer the banks moves slower than the water in the middle of the stream, so anything in a stream of water will tend to rotate as the bit near the middle of the stream is pushed faster than the stuff nearer the bank.

There's some free OU videos available on iTunes regarding grad, div and curl about this (part of the MST209 course I did last year): http://itunes.apple.com/jm/itunes-u/grad-div-curl-for-ipod-iphone/id380228199

No idea how they form in the first place though. There are lots of other examples in the 'related videos' links on the right of your video, so it's not just a one-off and looks like an entirely natural phenomenon.
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