Author Topic: Buying a trailer (whats best)  (Read 4405 times)

Buying a trailer (whats best)
« on: June 15, 2011, 09:21:05 pm »
I am thinking of buying a trailer. Main uses will be weekly shopping trips and maybe some camping/touring.
I know quite a few forumers use a trailer so thought i would ask here first for general advice.
I like the look of this one so opinions encouraged.
Tia

Buy ROSE luggage trailer - single-track - online

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2011, 10:00:30 pm »
Looks like the generic "TW Bents" trailer. This is sold by a number of companies and retailers.

My only comment is that a two wheel trailer is easier to manage and load around shops etc.


Wowbagger

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2011, 10:06:16 pm »
If you want to try one of those, there's one in my garage!

Actually, it's another "Yakalike" bought from "Square Wheels" bike shop, Strathpeffer, via Ebay. I'm sure I got it for a lot less than £186. From memory I think it was about £100.
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Wowbagger

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2011, 10:09:18 pm »
There's one ten on ebay now as a "buy it now" for under £80!

NEW CARGO Bicycle Bike Trailer Single Wheel SILVER | eBay UK

Compare to a genuine Bob Yak from SJS.

BOB YAK XL LUGGAGE CYCLE TRAILER WITH YAK SAK 11848 | eBay UK
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jogler

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2011, 10:11:04 pm »
Having loaded the Cannondale up like a pack mule(2x front panniers:2x rear panniers:bar bag:Camper Longflap saddle bag) for the recent yacf camping trip to Cannock Chase & "enjoyed" the interesting aspects of handling the beast my mind has turned to the acquisition of a trailer in due course.
Therefore I shall follow this thread with interest.
atm I have a preference for a single wheel trailer;believing that it would track the bike more faithfully & roll better over unsealed roads.

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2011, 10:12:27 pm »
ditto on 2 wheeled trailer being easier to walk round the shops.
I have a small Y-frame carryfreedom (with walking handle) which gets used at least once a week. Usually with a carrying box adapted from a plastic toy crate bolted on - but taking this off leaves a flat bed which can be useful to carry other types of load:
eg
-large metal trunk
-40 x 30 inch morris sticks
-logs
sacks of compost

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2011, 10:15:28 pm »
I'd quite like a cheap-but-functional two-wheeled trailer at some point.  Mainly for comedy shopping / confusing the people at the tip, and not at all for collecting pre-loved machine tools bought at bargain prices on eBay.  Something that can be made flat for storage would be good.

I appreciate that such things don't handle that well for touring, but that's what over-engineered german recumbents that take four full-size panniers are for.  Two wheels are also trike-compatible.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2011, 10:18:05 pm »
 Two wheels are also trike-compatible.

Discuss....(Philosophy degree question)

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2011, 10:18:48 pm »
The best type of trailer depends exactly on what you're going to be doing with it.

A single wheeled trailer, like you've linked to, works well for things like touring.  In that sort of case you often aren't carrying a vast amount of volume or mass, so it's adequate, and the advantage of this trailer design is that it's relatively narrow, so if you can get your bike through generally the trailer will fit as well.

A two wheeled "flat-bed" trailer (which may or may not have some sort of box on it), like a Carry Freedom Trailer, can generally transport bulkier and heavier objects than a single wheeled trailer.  The single wheeled trailers which are mounted on the rear axle, don't generally like a lot of mass too high up, they tend to want to make the entire bike and trailer assembly tip over, which can make loading and low speed handling difficult.

Some two wheeled trailers, can be reasonably compact, if they are just a flat structure, and the wheels are removable.  If it's a box construction with permanently fitted wheels, then it can be a bit bulky.  Most of the one wheel trailers are reasonably compact, but don't shrink too much (if at all), so you'll need somewhere to store them.

The big potential downside to a two wheeled trailer (aside from storing it, possibly), is that it's much wider on the road.  You have to take some care when passing things, and with narrow bicycle routes (ie collision with kerbs, barriers etc).

I've got a Yak Bob (which is similar to the Rose one), which can take a moderate amount of load.  I've used it for some camping, and it had plenty of room for a large tent, and all the rest of my kit, probably more kit than I could carry in four panniers.  It works OK for shopping, but I normally bungee a plastic box onto the back, which helps to keep the groceries constrained.

I've considered getting a Large Carry Freedom as well, since it'll take a lot larger load than the Yak Bob (The Carry Freedom comes in two different sizes).

I've taken heavy loads of recyclables along using the Yak Bob, but it made the handling uncomfortable, and it was difficult to keep the bike upright when stationary.
Actually, it is rocket science.
 

rwa.martin

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2011, 10:21:22 pm »
Take a look at the Carry Freedom website.  http://www.carryfreedom.com. On the info page is a summary of the pros and cons for the different options for load carrying. In their view 2 wheels is better for on road whilst 1 wheel is better off. I've a Y frame small and I'm very pleased with it. If you're local to Pembrokeshire you're welcome to give it a try.
Rich.

Charlotte

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2011, 10:56:13 pm »
I have a large CF Y frame and it rocks.  I can get two standard B&Q/Wilco foldy-crates onto it (and two more stacked on top depending on weight) or one big office-removals crate.

It's well made, the hitch is good and the wheels pop off on QR buttons so it stores flat.  Brilliant bit of kit.
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arabella

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2011, 10:24:31 am »
I have a re-purposed burley child trailer - remove the canvas and have a sheet of chequerplate instead so now flat bed.  If I need 'walls' then I put back the sides of the original frame.  Without these it's flattish but the wheels always there (?12")
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interzen

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2011, 10:31:39 am »
I'm looking at getting an ExtraWheel (Extrawheel | bicycle trailer advert trailer mobile billboard cycle touring single wheel trailer) for when I do my Australian Desert Special in a couple of years time - my main reasoning is that it can function as a spare wheel transportation device, will take a 26" wheel (handy for outback roads which are more than blessed with things like bulldust and the occasional pothole) and the fitting system plays nice with the Alfine hub gear.

My only real gripes with the ExtraWheel are the cost (it ain't cheap) and that they've changed the design, moving away from mesh side pockets to what basically amounts to a couple of low-rider racks attached to the frame.

microphonie

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2011, 06:57:56 pm »
Buying a trailer is something I've been looking at for a while too. I ordered one of these a couple of years ago but sent it back when the lacquer started to peel off when assembling it for the first time. A few people commented on the hitching method & cornering ability, so I think I got away with it...

The Avenir/Raleigh/Phillips Mule is a popular low-cost 2-wheeler. Seen plenty of these around so think they should be ok.

I've also had this from KMS bookmarked for a while. Not so sure about the quality of these though but it's probably the cheapest model I've seen anywhere.
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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2011, 07:03:54 pm »
+1 for the CF Y frame. I have a small one (insert your own joke here) and it's excellent. Though I did once roll it after clipping a kerb ...

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2011, 07:06:01 pm »
I think we are going to go for the two wheeled version, this one
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Bicycle-Bike-Cycle-Trailer-Luggage-Camping-Fishing-NEW-/110680873866?_trksid=p4340.m8&_trkparms=algo%3DMW%26its%3DC%26itu%3DUCC%26otn%3D6%26ps%3D63%26clkid%3D691659439376573061
I was convinced the one wheeled type was the one, but for all round use I am starting to think a two wheeler is going to be a better buy and much more versitile.
Also these are just down the road from us in Wickford.

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2011, 07:22:18 pm »
I like the idea of the Large Carry Freedom Y-Trailer, simply because of it's huge weight capacity.  They rate it at being capable of carrying 90kg, which would be enough to carry me!
Actually, it is rocket science.
 

Panoramix

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Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2011, 07:23:22 pm »
Assuming it is only touring and "normal" shopping (ie the "Tesco run") I would seriously consider this one: Extrawheel | bicycle trailer advert trailer mobile billboard cycle touring single wheel trailer

Obviously it wouldn't work to carry really bulky or heqvy stuff but i think that this one is really a case of less is more.
Chief cat entertainer.

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2011, 07:49:06 pm »
One thing the trailer really needs to be able to carry is a couple of bags of compost from time to time  :)
I thought about using a trailer for camping, but tbh having spent £££ buying waterproof panniers is it really worth it  :-\

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2011, 08:13:05 pm »
 Two wheels are also trike-compatible.

Discuss....(Philosophy degree question)

Very basically....

One wheel trailer tips with bike when cornering,but on a trike it cannot do so -as a truly when it tries to it puts a twisting stress on the frame.

That is why some trike manufacturers specify two wheel trailers


Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2011, 08:32:09 pm »
  Two wheels are also trike-compatible.
Discuss....(Philosophy degree question)
Very basically....

One wheel trailer tips with bike when cornering,but on a trike it cannot do so -as a truly when it tries to it puts a twisting stress on the frame.

That is why some trike manufacturers specify two wheel trailers

Many years ago, I tried towing my Yak Bob behind my 2nd gen Trice.  It worked OKish.  When I put panniers on the Trice as well, the twisting force of the trailer on the Trice made it unridable, it was so unstable.  Either the panniers or the trailer worked, although made things a little less stable than an unloaded machine, but both together was a nono.

... Large Carry Freedom Y-Trailer ... capable of carrying 90kg ...
Just make sure that the load on the trailer is not heavier than the rider as the bike's rear wheel can lift off the ground when braking, leading to jack-knifing.

At a guess, weight in panniers on the rear rack would help offset this effect, at the cost of making the load even heavier!

Ideally you'd have additional brakes on the trailer, configured to take their braking impetus from the tow hitch, so that they'd automagically compensate for this type of behaviour.  Obviously this would make for a substantially more complex design however.
Actually, it is rocket science.
 

rdaviesb

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2011, 12:51:25 pm »
I have a large CarryFreedom Y frame that you can put obscene weight on. Highly recommended for utility cycling. For touring I prefer to use an Extrawheel, as it tracks better and hasn't as much impact on the bike handling. Both are excellent bits of kit.

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2011, 02:12:24 pm »
is there any specifics, like do you need a hollow axle for one type of trailer or can they be fitted to bikes with a solid axle ???

rdaviesb

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2011, 03:05:37 pm »
The CarryFreedom has a hitch which fits over a solid or QR axle. The Extrawheel is attached to its own dedicated skewer, which has hitch points at either end (the trailer is attached at either side of the axle). Alternatively you can buy Extrawheel hitches which you can bolt onto mudguard eyes, if you have a bit with a solid axle.

Re: Buying a trailer (whats best)
« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2011, 06:47:41 pm »
Many thanks all, have gone for a two wheeled one I linked to up thread. Picked up from Wickford today.
Got a spare hitch, one for 2_Flat_Erics and one for me, and we have both had a go around the block.