Author Topic: Help with frame related questions  (Read 142131 times)

Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #425 on: December 28, 2016, 06:45:37 pm »
worth doing if you have Pompino.  They rust like buggery from the inside.  I did mine and the one I sold to Mr Endon, and had a load of Waxoyl left.  I got my Waxoyl on t'internet, with an applicator.  Enough for 5 or 6 frames I'd think so maybe worth sharing with other forrummers

Does the Pompino rust from the inside any more than other similar frames?
On-One say "Our tubing (DN6) comes from a company called Founderland in Taichung, Taiwan. Off the same lines, the same material, the same dies, everything, Reynolds have Founderland put the same tubing into boxes with "Reynolds 520" on it." So surely any bike similarly tubed would rust as badly?

Dave_C

  • Trying to get rid of my belly... and failing!
Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #426 on: January 02, 2017, 05:43:09 pm »
My turn to ask a question, if I may. I have bought a s/h Cotic Bfe frame and plan to move everything over from my Spec Rockhopper to the Cotic. They are both straight headtube so hopefully no problems there. It needs a new headset, so I may see if I can stretch to a Hope as I'll never really need to fit another in my lifetime.

But the frame brake line guides look like they are for cable and I have hydraulic brakes. Any suggestions? I don't want to butcher the guides but there are slotted guides for tie wraps so this may be a possibility.

Anything else I should be aware of? I have a circa 2010 Rockhopper as a donor which has 9 speed Deore crank which should fit but I have been told that unlike road bikes the crank may need shims or spacers to make the crank fit the bb? Can anyone elaborate please? Other than that I hope the transplant will be a quick and painless affair.

Cheers, Dave C

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Zipperhead

  • The cyclist formerly known as Big Helga
Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #427 on: January 03, 2017, 02:19:06 pm »
But the frame brake line guides look like they are for cable and I have hydraulic brakes. Any suggestions? I don't want to butcher the guides but there are slotted guides for tie wraps so this may be a possibility.

I used these when I converted my tandem to hydraulic brakes - Magura brake hose guides

They bolt into the existing cable guide and the brake pipe clips into them.
Our son does know who Boz Scaggs is, we've done ok as parents.

Dave_C

  • Trying to get rid of my belly... and failing!
Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #428 on: January 03, 2017, 11:02:37 pm »
Thanks Zipperhead! I recall seeing something like these before. Thanks for the help! :D

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Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #429 on: January 03, 2017, 11:04:28 pm »
You can just cable-tie the hose on and use the existing stops as guides. It won't be that neat, but it'll work.


Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #431 on: January 05, 2017, 08:31:13 pm »
I have to say my experience of those is less than sub-optimal.

Cleaned paintwork then degreased with solvent, dried and warmed the surface. Stuck for about 20 minutes. I think the manufacturers know this, that's why they come with zip ties, it's a tacit admission that they dont work...

ETA. Six anna half quid for three bits of plastic is scandalous!
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #432 on: June 07, 2017, 08:06:05 am »
Having  crashed  through  a few potholes on a  600K perm on the  T T* machine this weekend and having broken a pair of Longstaff tandem forks in the past**  I  am thinking  of  taking them out of the frame and giving  them the 'ding and ring' test.

Having only seen this being done once by D.Y.  how hard and where should I ding and how do I preserve the paint? is this test, with my cloth ears worth it?

These are nice flexible forks. as  G.L. said to me 'these are yer front suspension'  you can see the blades flexing over bumps. However due to 'modern roads' the 28C tyre will be replaced with a 35C for LEL.

*some of this parish will know I  mean tandem trike not time trial  :)
** To be fair in that  instance the blade was not properly brazed into the crown - 'twas mostly held in with flux. Compare this with Georges overbuilt frame fillets... :-[



LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #433 on: June 07, 2017, 01:10:40 pm »
You shouldn't be hitting the fork hard enough to chip paint off (or hitting the fork crown). Basically make a tink or ding sound up high (mostly) on the fork blades and be concerned if there is a noticeable difference between one fork blade and the other. If you are tone-deaf, there must be a smartphone app that recognises pitch. I know there are ones for guitar tuning.

Look really hard at the paint over brazed joints too.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

fd3

Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #434 on: August 06, 2017, 10:53:39 am »
Query about bikes for light riders:
As most bikes are made for "the generic" rider with an addition to avoid liability, you often get posts on forums from powerful heavier riders looking for a frame to replace the series of frames that they have destroyed through being mighty and massive.
On the flip side, if you are a tall 65kg rider, might it make sense to have a bike built for you instead of for the heavier masses? (I know it's not that much lighter than average, but it is for say a 6'+ rider).
Would you get a bike that is not overly stiff out of it?
Would the bike be lighter?
Or is it a theoretical thing that wouldn't happen as it is too dependent on the narrow choice of tubing available?
Thanks.

Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #435 on: August 06, 2017, 12:11:23 pm »
Aluminium is cheaper and sometimes lighter.
Carbon is usually expensive and lighter. Carbon soaks up vibration and bumps better than aluminium.

don't obsess over the material. Test ride some bikes and buy the one that feels right.

Close clearances are pointless, IMO.
I suspect you are associating them with snappy handling that feels fast.


Hi mrcharly. I personally have never ridden a Carbon frame - and my pension would not support such frivolous fashion.
Carbon is known for being a severe ride and very little kindly to the skeleton as a quality steel frame is.
Carbon is also known for sudden and inexplicable failures as it is also known for crushing if one is a little heavy-handed with Spanners and or Allen Keys.
Whether it be 531 single or double butted or even Columbus tubing - there is a comfort level that really does take some beating.

Rider weight and Saddle choice has a great-deal to do with rider comfort and as does bar/stem choice and the appropriate wrappings of bar-tape.

My road bike is a Steve Goff Columbus tubed - Designer Select - three different Columbus tubes chosen by Steve Goff for their particular attributes.
I have just built a Bianchi Via Nirone 7 Alu Carbon (Carbon Forks and Carbon Seat Stays) as a Flat-bar Road Hybrid on Campagnolo Veloce levers.
At almost 72yrs young the blend of 7000 Alloy and very little carbon is about as much as my old bones will tolerate on our crappy roads and with the comfort of the Flat-bars for a leisurely and upright ride.
Your ears are your rear-end defenders,keep them free of clutter and possibly live longer.

Re: Help with frame related questions
« Reply #436 on: November 06, 2017, 07:18:48 pm »
Help needed , shim material for Airnimal telescopic seat tube reducing from 30.2 mm to 30mm . I thought s/s sheet epoxy resin glued in , but can only seem to buy in China . Any thoughts ?


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