Author Topic: A random thread for cycling things that don't really warrant their own thread  (Read 24560 times)

bludger

  • Randonneur and bargain hunter
I would advise weighing them down with some ballast though - some old paving blocks do the trick in the family's!

I just came off the phone with East Midlands rail to reserve a bike space for a return trip to Sheffield in May for All Points North. I'd already decided which trains I wanted to use.

The call took 26 minutes.

FFS.
YACF touring/audax bargain basement:
https://bit.ly/2Xg8pRD


Cudzoziemiec

  • Waking up now, put the kettle on!
My son has destroyed what were I think my first pair of cycling-specific full-finger gloves. It would have been the winter of either 2000/01 or 01/02 I bought them. In addition to whatever I put on them, they've served him two winters of paper round, so I'm satisfied.
I do not ride a great big Mercian, gangster tanwalls, fixed cog in the back.

Rode along with a tandem crew  for a couple of minutes , just before Traquair village ( nr Peebles ) .The pilot looked at my bike and said " oh i see you have Spa cycles chain rings fitted I work for them " .I replied " I Though Spa cycles were one of the last decent tourist cycle shops left . He thanked me then we parted . Dear God  He must live on carrots to spot that  or if you don a VC167  Top  do you get super human powers .
Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the soul  three wheels Nurses !!!


Bugger !!! I was hoping he was called " The Bicycle Repair man " , and  would vanish in to a phone box at the mere sight of a broken touring bike . Don the VC167 Top  and be able to fix   knackered   rohloff hubs with only gaffer tape and  choice words . I should stop eating foreign food it do weird things to my head .That Scots pie and Iron brew at  Selkirk was a bad choice , tasty but bad .   
Four wheels move the body, two wheels move the soul  three wheels Nurses !!!

A usanian bike mechanic mate has a blog and recently wrote this, in relation to bike engineering, which I thought might chime with a few here

Quote
....looking back over my life I realize that I have lost every war I was ever in. The industry sold its soul to planned obsolescence in the 1990s, and the addicts who depend on it live in a world viewed through their perceived need.

MiniDisk and Betamax never took off outside of people who needed to use them for a living, either.

Kim

  • Timelord
Objection: Minidisc was a successful consumer product, for the few short years between its 1996 renaissance and Moore's Law rendering it obsolete.  Just not in the way the record companies hoped.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Still use minidisc... In the car.

Sent from my BKL-L09 using Tapatalk


Objection: Minidisc was a successful consumer product, for the few short years between its 1996 renaissance and Moore's Law rendering it obsolete.  Just not in the way the record companies hoped.
I always thought Minidisc was the size (or slightly smaller than) the size CDs should have been. if the apocyphal sony boss had preferred a shorter classical piece:
given that Sony made the cassette tape walkman which fitted nicely in (most?) human hands  it seems a pity they did not consider the size of portable players: a five inch wide player is just awkward:
if a even 4in disc could have done 45-50 mins..... perhaps the BBC could have licenced them a 16bit 48khz nicam?

and if all the studio equipment used 48khz then use 48khz sample rate on CD....

The story I'd heard was that the CD was intended to go into the slot for a standard car radio.
Don't think anyone had even thought about making them portable.
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

Obligatory link to the pocket size Sony CD player:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AowJGns66_4

44.1 KHz was derived from early systems that stored digital audio on video tapes. I think 48 KHz came later.

Obligatory link to the pocket size Sony CD player:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AowJGns66_4

44.1 KHz was derived from early systems that stored digital audio on video tapes. I think 48 KHz came later.

We had a couple of those, they had recording capability, too, along with astonishing run time off a single AA

Objection: Minidisc was a successful consumer product, for the few short years between its 1996 renaissance and Moore's Law rendering it obsolete.  Just not in the way the record companies hoped.

Objection overruled. The Minidisc never got much traction in the consumer market, although it was ubiquitous in the pro market, much in the way Betamax fared. I suspect (?) that the consumer Betamax peak (which almost certainly exceeded the Minidisc market share) probably occurred earlier in your life, making it less evident? Only a suggestion.

Kim

  • Timelord
Objection: Minidisc was a successful consumer product, for the few short years between its 1996 renaissance and Moore's Law rendering it obsolete.  Just not in the way the record companies hoped.

Objection overruled. The Minidisc never got much traction in the consumer market, although it was ubiquitous in the pro market, much in the way Betamax fared. I suspect (?) that the consumer Betamax peak (which almost certainly exceeded the Minidisc market share) probably occurred earlier in your life, making it less evident? Only a suggestion.

I didn't even have a telly until Betamax had failed.  One of my brother's friends parents had one, which was considered a tragic novelty.

But in my teens I watched Minidisc go from a convenient alternative to Fidelipac and hand-spliced open reel tape for theatre and radio, to the preferred portable music format amongst my peers[1].  What was notable was that (outside the studio) this was almost entirely portables[2], and I think I saw a pre-recorded Minidisc in the wild once.

That may not have been reflected in overall market share, but I expect it would have replaced cassette, with cheap recorders becoming ubiquitous, if MP3 and flash memory hadn't rendered them irrelevant in the early 2000s.  It was a good tech, with natural consumer appeal.  The main barrier was price (not least because you effectively needed a CD player to go with it).  I had a conversation recently with a friend (a few years younger than me) who called me 'retro' for having a cassette walkman in secondary school - I think she straddled the transition from MD and mainstream CD-R to MP3 players.

(AIUI Sony shot themselves in the foot by making the data version deliberately incompatible with the music discs; they might otherwise have scooped up the Zip disk market too.)


[1] Tech-savvy middle class teenagers.  A few were unfortunate enough to have already invested in portable CD players.  Cassette remained popular amongst those who weren't that interested in music, had access to a car, or didn't want an expensive walkman.
[2] I knew a couple of people at university had integrated sound systems with a MD recorder, and then a playback-only walkman.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Rode along with a tandem crew  for a couple of minutes , just before Traquair village ( nr Peebles ) .The pilot looked at my bike and said " oh i see you have Spa cycles chain rings fitted I work for them " .I replied " I Though Spa cycles were one of the last decent tourist cycle shops left . He thanked me then we parted . Dear God  He must live on carrots to spot that  or if you don a VC167  Top  do you get super human powers .

Jan and I hired a Thorn tandem in that area from a guy called Christopher Rainbow quite a few years ago. I think it was before we bought our Thorn, so that would probably have been the summer of 2006. I wonder if he is still in business? I think he also used to make dulcimers and was a postman in his spare time.

Edit: https://cyclescottishborders.com/attraction/christopher-rainbow-tandem-and-bike-hire/

He still has a web presence!
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

.... I watched Minidisc go from a convenient alternative to Fidelipac and hand-spliced open reel tape for theatre and radio, to the preferred portable music format amongst my peers

And there you have it. It reflects well on you showing your somewhat exclusive perspective, but I'd have a shilling on the side that there are close to zero readers* who even knew that Fidelipac was a thing. QED.

*outside of those involved in broadcast of some nature

Kim

  • Timelord
.... I watched Minidisc go from a convenient alternative to Fidelipac and hand-spliced open reel tape for theatre and radio, to the preferred portable music format amongst my peers

And there you have it. It reflects well on you showing your somewhat exclusive perspective, but I'd have a shilling on the side that there are close to zero readers* who even knew that Fidelipac was a thing. QED.

I don't see what that proves:  For my peers, Minidisc was something new that was invented in 1996.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
One of my ex-bosses was still having minidisc players installed into his BMW company cars as an option in or around 2006, just so he didn't have to throw his collection away
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens