Author Topic: Bat in the house!  (Read 1059 times)

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Bat in the house!
« on: August 22, 2012, 09:40:47 pm »
Just had a shriek from Mrs. F.
Smallish rodent-like thing on the carpet in the hall.

It's a young bat, just sat there, all scared.
I attempt my normal spider-method of a dish over the top, then a sheet of paper under to capture.
But the dish provided did not have a flat rim profile, and the bugger crawled out, after emitting some displeased shreiks.

Now, I have a bat darting about in my hallway.

Throw open the front door, turn on the outside light, turn off all inside lights.
No, the bugger goes up the stairs.
Throw open the top-of stairs velux, and ask for assistance to close the other upstairs doors.
Too late.   It's in our bedroom.

Close the bedroom door to contain the situation.
Throw open the balcony doors and veluxes whilst dodging the creature which is zooping around frenetically.
Eventually, through brownian motion, it flies out the balcony doors.

How improbable is that?
Time for a nice hot cup of tea.

R


Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2012, 10:27:59 pm »
Ooof, that sounds stressful - well done on getting it out eventually! Did it, err, make a mess as it flew about?

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2012, 10:31:41 pm »
Did it, err, make a mess as it flew about?

Not that I've noticed so far.

That's the second bat we've had in this house.

A price, perhaps, of the semi-rural location.

a lower gear

  • Carmarthenshire - "Not ALWAYS raining!"
Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2012, 11:16:40 pm »
Having been passed by half a dozen bats in a flat-out crawl half a mile into a cave, and having watched them darting back and forth through the branches of a tree waving about in a good stiff breeze, nothing about where bats can get to can surprise!

Flying mice. Brilliant, fascinating creatures.

tonycollinet

  • No Longer a western province of Númenor
Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2012, 11:23:06 pm »
I love bats. And their echo location system means they are pretty good at flying about without hitting stuff - including windows.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2012, 12:17:06 am »
Bats do dry(er) poos, unlike birds.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

RJ

  • Droll rat
Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2012, 09:26:39 pm »
Bats do dry(er) poos, unlike birds.

Probably because bird poo is also bird pee  ;)

Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2012, 09:26:13 pm »
I love bats. And their echo location system means they are pretty good at flying about without hitting stuff - including windows.

I remember David Attenborough telling a story about when he had to go a piece to camera at the mouth of a cave, from which millions of bats were flying out for the evening hunting. He told how thanks to their incredible echo location, they could all exit through the narrow cave mouth, without hitting each other. The director called 'cut!' and a bat flew straight into Attenborough's face....
If I had a baby elephant, it could help me wash the car. If I had a car.

See my recycled crafts at www.wastenotwantit.co.uk

Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2012, 09:41:42 pm »
Eventually, through brownian motion, it flies out the balcony doors.
That's not brownian motion.

Time for a nice hot cup of tea.
That's brownian motion.

(Is browninan motion named after someone called brown? If so, it really could have been called brown motion. Except, really, it couldn't.)
L'enfer, c'est les autos.

Re: Bat in the house!
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2012, 08:44:12 pm »
Eventually, through brownian motion, it flies out the balcony doors.
That's not brownian motion.

Time for a nice hot cup of tea.
That's brownian motion.

(Is browninan motion named after someone called brown? If so, it really could have been called brown motion. Except, really, it couldn't.)

A biologist called Robert Brown who was studying the motion of pollen grains suspended in water.
“There is no point in using the word 'impossible' to describe something that has clearly happened.”
― Douglas Adams