Author Topic: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop  (Read 79280 times)

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #175 on: April 22, 2014, 10:01:03 pm »
It mostly started out looking like this:



with gas-taps, sinks, electric sockets still attached.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #176 on: April 23, 2014, 10:30:03 am »
Ace! Good work!

Graeme

  • Priest, Preacher and Prophet
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    • BalancingOnTwoWheels
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #177 on: April 23, 2014, 01:19:45 pm »
As I've arrived late I've made some fresh popcorn for everyone.  But then I ate it all while reading through the eight pages of wobbly craziness.
37. Because travel is the finest educational system of all; and cycling the cheapest, easiest, and most educational means of travel - Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #178 on: April 23, 2014, 05:40:36 pm »
That sounds about right!

BrianI

  • Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's Lepidopterist Man!
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #179 on: April 24, 2014, 05:39:25 pm »
Excellently fettled greenhouse there!   :)

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #180 on: April 25, 2014, 02:07:21 pm »
Has John seen this?

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #181 on: May 05, 2014, 09:47:17 pm »
Has John seen this?

La, La, La, La... not listening.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #182 on: May 05, 2014, 10:02:35 pm »
I thought you might be interested in how I built the greenhouse door using false tenons.

I can do mortice & tenon joints by hand, but the bits of benchtop I had were not quite long enough for tenons on the crossmembers. So, I cut everything to length so that it butted up to each other to make the door the right size.

Then:

1. Made a jig for that fits the thickness of the wood and has a slot for the router bush.



2. Use the router to cut 1/2" wide slot, in stages to the full depth of the long cutter (about 35mm).







3. Offcuts of the benchtop are planed down to 1/2", cut to width, and then the edges rounded on the table router:



4. The table router was also used to cut a housing to take a plywood panel for the bottom section of the door.

If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #183 on: May 05, 2014, 10:12:10 pm »
BTW, I gave my grandson a toy for Easter, rather than a chocolate egg. I built this lorry about 25 years ago for my son, and it needed a little restoration to replace a couple of damaged bits and a fresh coat of varnish.  :smug:



Oak chassis, mahogany bodywork - all scrap wood from furniture being thrown away. The wheels were off scrapped pushchair buggys.  :thumbsup:

(It is based on plans by Richard Blizzard)
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Arellcat

  • Velonautte
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #184 on: May 05, 2014, 11:33:46 pm »
I built this lorry about 25 years ago for my son, and it needed a little restoration to replace a couple of damaged bits and a fresh coat of varnish. It is based on plans by Richard Blizzard.

And somewhere in my house I have a photocopied set of those very instructions which are probably about 25 years old.  Good to see someone actually built it!

I just know I'm now going to end up turning the place upside down to find them.

Ruth

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #185 on: May 05, 2014, 11:37:32 pm »
Wow.  Great toy.  Can you imagine unwrapping the box that came in, on Christmas morning? 

Clazzer, your weekends are taken care of now for at least two years, I reckon.

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #186 on: May 06, 2014, 09:13:03 am »
Oooh, is there some tilt in those front wheels - to maybe help with the cornering and that?

Nice.

There should be some tilt (a factor of the centre point steering and castor angle), but is exagerated in the photos on account of not having any headset bearing in the kingpins.  ::-)
ackerman steering?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #187 on: May 06, 2014, 09:16:31 am »
ackerman steering?

No, I'll be steering it myself.  :P

  ;)
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #188 on: May 06, 2014, 09:26:32 am »
I built this lorry about 25 years ago for my son, and it needed a little restoration to replace a couple of damaged bits and a fresh coat of varnish. It is based on plans by Richard Blizzard.

And somewhere in my house I have a photocopied set of those very instructions which are probably about 25 years old.  Good to see someone actually built it!

I just know I'm now going to end up turning the place upside down to find them.

I made them the ride on car, the 'rocking horse' dog and one of the Landrovers from the same book as well.  :smug:

I still have the book somewhere - and volume 2 as well.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #189 on: May 07, 2014, 12:21:40 am »
Gawd! There ain't 'alf some clever bar stewards on this forum . . .
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #190 on: May 13, 2014, 07:40:38 pm »
A 'work one' from the Wobbly Workshop today  :D

Physicists - they're not very good at setting up oscilloscopes ::-)

"Do I need a flaming 'silliscope' to demonstrate standing waves?"

Well you do now.  :demon:

1.5mm holes were drilled at 15mm intervals along a length of 75mm dia aluminium tube (scrap from a roller blackboard)



Hardwood ends were machined on the CNC router...



...and a thread cut on the connector scavenged from an old bunsen burner.



The connector was bolted in and the closed end fitted, both sealed with silicone.



The other hardwood end cracked, so I remade it in ply. It was then fitted so that it held a latex membrane (god knows what ebay will offer me as 'other items you might be interested in' after buying sheet latex. :facepalm:)



A speaker (unwanted PC speaker) was then fitted over the membrane.



After testing for leaks, connecting the speaker to a signal generator and the tube to the gas tap (and flushing i with gas), we have a 'flaming oscilloscope' for demonstrating resonance!



 Video  8)

http://youtu.be/yx2Ph3SZWSU

Needs a bit of tweeking.  :-\

Edit - connecting the supply to 2 gas taps, via a 'Y' connector worked wonders. :D
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #191 on: May 13, 2014, 07:56:45 pm »
It makes me happy to know that jobs like yours exist.

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #192 on: May 14, 2014, 12:30:29 pm »
Sheer genius.
Rust never sleeps

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #193 on: May 14, 2014, 12:35:58 pm »
Standing waves are so much better with FIRE than the traditional slinky. Though I had assumed that every school had one of these in the science cupboard. Now I'm wondering how many year 8 physicists have been missing out...
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #194 on: May 14, 2014, 01:18:30 pm »
Awsumz
Getting there...

Graeme

  • Priest, Preacher and Prophet
  • @FatherHilarious
    • BalancingOnTwoWheels
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #195 on: May 14, 2014, 03:26:29 pm »
Totally wicked. Makes me wish I'd gone to some physics lessons.
37. Because travel is the finest educational system of all; and cycling the cheapest, easiest, and most educational means of travel - Kuklos' 39 Articles

Marco Stefano

  • Apply some pressure, you lose some pressure...
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #196 on: May 16, 2014, 10:28:59 pm »
Son et lumiere.

JennyB

  • Old enough to know better
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #197 on: May 17, 2014, 07:17:24 am »
ackerman steering?

No, I'll be steering it myself.  :P

  ;)

Always wondered: if the wheels weren't connected but steered independently (steer the outside and let the inside wheel castor) how much braking could you get by turning both in before the tyres came off the rims?   :demon:
Jennifer - walker of hills



Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #198 on: May 17, 2014, 12:08:01 pm »
ackerman steering?

No, I'll be steering it myself.  :P

  ;)

Always wondered: if the wheels weren't connected but steered independently (steer the outside and let the inside wheel castor) how much braking could you get by turning both in before the tyres came off the rims?   :demon:

Depends on how well the big chainring cuts through tarmac...
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Tales from the Wobbly Workshop
« Reply #199 on: June 23, 2014, 11:48:31 am »
Dear Mr Wobble,

While riding along lazily in the sunshine the other day, I got to thinking a question and I realised that you may well have the answer.

We have seen and enjoyed your wobble bikes, and the process behind creating them. Have you ever created a bike with zero castor angle? Is is particularly difficult to ride? One imagines that if nothing else, it will not be a leisurely activity.

Yours sincerely

Curious of Wanstead