Author Topic: HS2  (Read 7195 times)

FifeingEejit

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Re: HS2
« Reply #100 on: September 09, 2019, 04:39:12 pm »
People criticise the speed of HS2, but the point of it is not speed per se, but capacity. If you build a conventional line, you'd have to make it four-track rather than two to get the same capacity.

Many are complaining, especially in the Chilterns, that they won't benefit from HS2 but have to bear the intrusion. Well, we all have to bear some intrusion of the nation's infrastructure, but they will benefit from the existing lines being able to provide a better local service, and hopefully less traffic on the roads.

Some Shinkansen trains already run at around 200mph, I've recorded 194mph on the Tohoku Shinkansen, and future trains will run higher speeds. The planned new Tokaido Shinkansen will use Maglev technology and reach around 500mph.

200mph is 320kmh
LGV Est has that as it's maximum operational speed, and apparently LGV Bretagne will be 350kmh
However the french drivers are apparently rewarded for being economical, so stick to the timetable for 300kmh unless running late.

The Maglev appears to be 500kmh rather than 500mph; it is often stated as being the only way to economically go over 300kmh.

One of the advantages of the Japanese system was isolation of network, they are now also working on gauge changers and multi-voltage systems to allow compatibility with their low speed network for some services.
The first Shinkasen only did 135mph...

The French went for the classic compatibility approach HS2 is to start with for good reason and produced a much more versatile network.


Re: HS2
« Reply #101 on: September 09, 2019, 05:13:15 pm »
Wrong units! :facepalm:

The Japanese prototype has reached 603kph (375mph).

Tohoku Shinkansen diverts off the Hokkaido Shinkansen north of Morioka onto what was a conventional JR narrow gauge track, the track was relaid to standard gauge. It runs at slow speed, twists and turns, and at one point has to reverse out of a station. Passengers can turn the seats round as is normally done at terminus stations.

FifeingEejit

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Re: HS2
« Reply #102 on: September 09, 2019, 05:51:43 pm »
The operation of the dual gauge section seems interesting!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokkaido_Shinkansen

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: HS2
« Reply #103 on: September 09, 2019, 08:15:10 pm »

I wonder how the tories plan to handle the fact the EU was funding a large lump of HS2?

J

Magic Money Tree.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: HS2
« Reply #104 on: September 09, 2019, 10:41:46 pm »
The operation of the dual gauge section seems interesting!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokkaido_Shinkansen

Japanese railways show a lot of ingenuity. There is a service starting in Kyoto as a subway train, then passing over a low mountain pass beside a road on quite steep and curving gradients, and finally running along the middle of the street in Otsu like a tram.

More than enough to give the ORR (UK rail safety regulator) apoplexy I should think!

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: HS2
« Reply #105 on: September 10, 2019, 10:25:37 am »
The operation of the dual gauge section seems interesting!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokkaido_Shinkansen

Japanese railways show a lot of ingenuity. There is a service starting in Kyoto as a subway train, then passing over a low mountain pass beside a road on quite steep and curving gradients, and finally running along the middle of the street in Otsu like a tram.

More than enough to give the ORR (UK rail safety regulator) apoplexy I should think!

The Weymouth harbour line is shut isn't it?