Author Topic: [HAMR] Visualizing the OYTT  (Read 171780 times)

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #800 on: October 31, 2015, 12:54:53 pm »
Flying back from Chicago tonight, so there will be a delay before Saturday's graphic.

And in a very tenuous link to visualizing the OYTT, this was what I have been doing in the Windy City...

We Become the City






crowriver

  • Крис Б
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #801 on: October 31, 2015, 03:28:42 pm »
Jo, looks interesting. SAIC: is the event coming from an art perspective, design, technology, or a bit of a mix of all three?
Embrace your inner Fred.

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #802 on: November 02, 2015, 04:46:45 pm »
A bit of all three really. You can see the programme here http://visap.uic.edu/2015/DataImprovisations_Catalog.pdf

(apologies to the OP for derailing this thread... normal service will be resumed soon)

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #803 on: November 02, 2015, 04:54:57 pm »
Day 304 / 85: Kurt's last day in Little Rock is a wet and shorter one, completing 119 miles of the hamster wheel. He will no doubt be happy to see the last of those roads, which he must have ridden many hundreds of times now. A long day for Steve riding to King's Lynn and back, getting home at approaching 2am but with 221 miles on the clock. Miles also has a longer day than usual with 192 miles of bay road riding.


red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #804 on: November 02, 2015, 06:02:54 pm »
Day 305 / 86: Kurt starts flying south for the winter with somewhere between 188-200 miles ridden subject to ironing out a few GPS problems. He ends the day in Louisiana and potentially within a couple of days of passing René Menzies' 1937 record. After yesterday's late finish, Steve does takes it marginally easier with a trip to the Peterborough area and back for 203 miles taking his reboot attempt within a gnat's whisker of Tommy's WR line (to be continued tomorrow...). Miles takes the train out west and rides east back towards Melbourne for 127 miles.


crowriver

  • Крис Б
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #805 on: November 02, 2015, 09:45:31 pm »
A bit of all three really. You can see the programme here http://visap.uic.edu/2015/DataImprovisations_Catalog.pdf

(apologies to the OP for derailing this thread... normal service will be resumed soon)

Great, thanks: looks really interesting!
Embrace your inner Fred.

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #806 on: November 03, 2015, 09:25:39 am »
Day 306 / 87: Kurt continues his migration to Florida heading south through Louisiana towards Baton Rouge. His healthy total for the day of 226 miles puts him within a day of René Menzies' 1937 record. Miles has a shorter 24 hours totalling 84 miles heading north to Seymour.

Steve heads to King's Lynn starting well, but with a short sleep stop towards the end of the day and completing his 215 miles after 2am. The chart doesn't show it yet as the ride finished after midnight, but Steve finished his ride within 2 miles of the ghost of Tommy Godwin riding a steady 8.57mph. Day 307/88 will be a significant one for Steve as he may well surface above that WR pace. And it was on day 88 of his first attempt that he was knocked off by an inattentive moped rider.



Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #807 on: November 03, 2015, 09:54:27 am »
...there will be a delay.....

We scarcely had a chance to notice it! Ongoing thanks to you Jo.

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #808 on: November 04, 2015, 07:28:12 am »
Day 307 / 88: Kurt continues his migration to warmer climes riding though Louisiana to the Mississippi gulf coast for exactly one Godwin. Steve, on day 88 of his reboot with continuing tummy troubles, tickles the WR line ending the day just 1.5 miles behind Tommy's ghost. Miles does a couple of trips north to Seymour before heading off to the west and a 24 hour total of 200 miles.


hillbilly

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #809 on: November 04, 2015, 10:02:41 am »
I suspect there is a psychological boost from tickling the Godwin line at the end of the day. 
But there may be an even bigger one when he starts the day not having dipped under. 
Onwards Steve.

SoreTween

  • Most of me survived the Pennine Bridleway.
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #810 on: November 04, 2015, 10:49:33 am »
Which comes next; Not starting the day below the Godwin line or ending a day above the Searvogel line?
2019 targets: TINAT 160 rough
There is only one infinite resource in this universe; human stupidity.

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #811 on: November 04, 2015, 06:32:16 pm »

Has Steve in fact already broken the Godwin Line on his 2nd attempt?

I'm going to put my head above the parapet and suggest that Steve has actually reached the Godwin line and exceeded it by a little over 4 miles at the end of Day 88.

The UMCA Total from official Spreadsheet up to and inc 16/10/2015 = 14364.7 miles

The data is on there as well up to and inc 29/10/2015 but has not been totalled up due to an error on the spreadsheet = 2687.1 miles

Add that to the data for the days up to and inc 3/11/2015 directly from Strava = 1050.3 miles

Total for Steve = 18102.1 miles

Tommy after 88 days is (75065/365) x 88 = 18097.9

that would make Steve 4.2 miles up on the Godwin Line at close of play Day 88.

I could be wrong of course so please check the data/calculations.






hillbilly

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #812 on: November 04, 2015, 06:36:01 pm »
I was a bit confused by this as well, given Steve's line on the day 88 chart ends above the horizontal axis. 
I thought I was missing something obvious so didn't mention it. 
But now someone has cast mathemagic...

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #813 on: November 04, 2015, 06:54:35 pm »
Yesterday, Steve peaked (above the Godwin line) at around 11:30pm when he finished the ride. In the remaining half hour once Steve had stopped for the night, the steady ghost of Tommy Godwin continued his 8.6mph riding so Steve's position began to fall down again. As it does through the night when he's not riding.

There is some minor graphical rounding and some error on the year's GPS totals which means in reality, I wouldn't want to call it to within 50 miles or so at this stage. It's more of a symbolic position at this level of detail. Based on recent progress, I am expecting Steve to be able to continue to edge upwards as he averages over 205.7mpd in the coming days, so he should emerge more unambiguously above the line.

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #814 on: November 05, 2015, 09:00:17 am »
Day 308 / 89: Kurts spends a day at the gulf coast doing steady laps to accumulate 201 miles. Having passed Rene Menzies' total, his next targets will be  100,000km and then Ozzie Nicholson's 1937 record, both of which he should achieve within a week. Steve starts a little later heading on another NE loop at his normal speed, but begins to slow towards the end of the day, eventually finishing around 2am with 206 miles. Little activity from Miles, who completed his night ride from the previous day with 67 miles.


red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #815 on: November 06, 2015, 06:46:37 am »
Day 309 / 90: Kurt continues with loops along the Mississippi gulf coast in high temperatures and humidity accumulating 220 miles for the day. A 217 mile Thetford Forest loop for Steve takes him above Tommy's WR pace for a while, but another finish after midnight means he is yet to end the 24 hour period comfortably above the line. Very little riding for Miles with only 2 Melbourne miles logged.


SoreTween

  • Most of me survived the Pennine Bridleway.
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #816 on: November 07, 2015, 09:41:09 am »
To answer my own question...
The Godwin line is 205.7 mpd
The Searvogel line is 207 mpd currently
The difference between the two is 1.3mpd
Today is Steve's day 92.
92*1.3=119.6, that's how far ahead of Tommy Steve needs to be to catch Kurt today.
Since this is less than a days progress Steve will end a day above the the Searvogel line before he begins a day ahead of Tommy's ghost.

Unless Steve or Kurt change their daily habit of course.
2019 targets: TINAT 160 rough
There is only one infinite resource in this universe; human stupidity.

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #817 on: November 07, 2015, 12:18:57 pm »
Day 310 / 91: Kurt spends another day based at Waveland on the Mississippi gulf coast passing a significant milestone – 100,000km in 301 days. Steve has a challenging day in blustery conditions, heading south and west for the first time in many months including the first visit to Marsh Gibbon since June 12th. He finishes with an early night and 141 miles ridden, leaving him 58 miles below the Godwin line. No ride posted by Miles today.


StevieB

  • I'm an embarrassment to my bicycle!
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #818 on: November 08, 2015, 10:07:41 am »
or 301 days at 332 km per day, average
or 301 days and the numbers are still staggering
It may be self-flagellation, but it still hurts

red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #819 on: November 08, 2015, 12:32:52 pm »
Day 311 / 92: More Waveland loops for Kurt who cuts things a little short (for him) at 195 miles when the Mississippi rain gets a bit much. Steve, starting from St Neots, has miserable wet and windy weather and some ongoing tummy troubles to contend with and makes it back home with 200 miles on the clock, 25 of them after midnight. Miles has a 65 mile night time ride to Seymour.


red marley

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #820 on: November 09, 2015, 07:21:15 am »
Day 312 / 93: Kurt battles strong crosswinds and rain along the Mississippi coast managing 154 miles but passing Ossie Nicholson's 1937 record. He only has two more to pass now – Bernard Bennett's and Tommy Godwin's 1939 milages.  Steve also has some windy weather looping through Thetford Forest and another 2am finish for 214 miles. This leaves him 55 miles below the Godwin line. No ride posted from Miles, who is now around 2750 miles behind pace.


LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #821 on: November 09, 2015, 10:46:17 am »
Instead of looking at graphs, to visualise Steve's amazing achievements, on Saturday I set off at 04:30 and rode 326km due North to Stockport.

By the time I got there it was past 11pm.  The weather was dark/windy, dark/rainy, very rainy, very windy, even more windy, even more rainy, windy, sunny, dark, cold, foggy, very cold and then very dark, foggy and cold.

It's not the first time I've ridden such a distance but it's the first time I've done it at this time of year.  What I noticed:

1 - It's dark just as much as it's light.  Night riding is slower and you certainly get a lot of night riding in November.

2 - It's full of weather.  It took lots of concentration to deal with buffetting from wind and rain. Lots of stopping to change into appropriate clothing for the conditions.

3 - It's messy.  The smaller roads and lanes were close to off-roading conditions at times.  soggy leaves, branches, gravel-strewn and often flooded.  Add darkness to that and some of my descending was at walking pace.  How I didn't puncture is a mystery.  It was very hard to keep up any sort of pace.

4 - Food.  I was much hungrier, more often.  Even though it started out mild I was soaked early on and then it got cold.  It takes a lot of extra calories to stay warm, extra calories you don't need in July.


People who don't cycle think that Steve's challenge is hard.  "Wow!", they say, "200 miles a day, that's a lot". But they really don't have a clue.

People who cycle think that Steve's challenge is very hard. "Wow!", they say, "I've done London-to Brighton and that was really tough.  I can't imagine 200 miles". They have a slight clue.

I think that, to fully appreciate what Steve is attempting, you really need to try a day in Steve's (cycling) shoes.  My (already high) respect for Steve went higher when I was about 250km into the ride and feeling weather-beaten and, quite frankly, bored of riding in the dark on my own.
When it's dark at 6pm, thinking to yourself "Just another 100km" is actually fairly depressing when you are on your own, in the middle of Nowhere, Nowhereshire.

I can sort of, possibly, maybe, perhaps, imagine getting to a place when 320km a day isn't physically too demanding but the mental aspect of banging out the miles, relentlessly, in the dark, is totally beyond me. 
I have always struggled, and always will struggle, to get any enjoyment out of riding dull miles in the cold & dark.

Amazing stuff Steve... Keep on going mate.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #822 on: November 09, 2015, 10:53:04 am »
Points very well made Lee!

(And you still managed a time for a 300 which would be respectable even in summer.)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #823 on: November 09, 2015, 06:46:05 pm »
You didn't try hard enough, Lee! 326km is below 1 Godwin!

Seriously, great respect. Jan and I jacked it in after 34 miles yesterday and got the train home. We could have done a more miles but we were due in Maidstone for babysitting purposes.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

simonp

  • Omnomnomnipotent.
Re: Visualizing the OYTT
« Reply #824 on: November 09, 2015, 07:28:03 pm »
I'm doing all my cycling training in the garage. I'll be cycling outside again next year.