Author Topic: Quorn  (Read 9293 times)

Re: Quorn
« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2008, 09:41:40 pm »
One of the great tragedies of the Royal NAvy.


We used to have ships like HMS Terrible, or Dreadnought - names to inspire dread and awe.

Now we have ships named after a food stuff!




HMS Quorn!

Hardly likely to inspire terror in one's enemies!

It's named after the town of Quorn, rather than the foodstuff I think.



There has always been a tradition of Minesweepers and towns, but unless you are in the know - That's not the connection most people make.




Pete

Re: Quorn
« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2008, 12:08:45 am »
Quorn isn't meat and probably isn't going to be accepted as meat substitute by all the throng of meat-lovers out there.

We use it because it nicely complements other non-meat ingredients in a meal.  Sometimes we choose other contrasting ingredients to complement each other in a dish (such as tofu + stir-fry vegetables).  Sometimes we choose quorn and something to go with quorn.  Quorn has its place and we like the flavour for what it is - rather than thinking of it as a substitute for what it isn't.

While we're on the topic of eating animals - well I'm also a wild mushroom devotee.  As any of you who have joined in this fun will know, wild mushrooms are often pervaded by tiny maggots.  If they're big enough and numerous enough to have riddled the mushroom with holes - well then we don't eat it.  We're that squeamish! But if they're smaller and their activities are not yet in evidence - well, why pass up a nice succulent cep?  So maybe I'm as much an animal-murderer as all the carnivores amongst us... :-\

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Quorn
« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2008, 12:20:14 am »
well, why pass up a nice succulent cep?

I'm sure Regulator will be along with a couple of reasons, but in the main, yes, go for it!
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Gandalf

  • Each snowflake in an avalanche pleads not guilty
Re: Quorn
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2008, 07:00:55 am »
Unfortunately in reality Quorn is no more 'animal friendly' than the meat which is purports to replace.  As it contains eggs I can't help wondering how many thousands of day old male chicks have been gassed or macerated alive for being the wrong sex to facilitate its production.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Quorn
« Reply #29 on: October 07, 2008, 11:10:00 am »
...It's not called the Berkeley any more - it's now the Kallisto.
...

Named after that Kallisto Flockhart, no doubt ;D
Getting there...

Re: Quorn
« Reply #30 on: October 11, 2008, 09:50:17 pm »
Before Quorn... there was Pruteen.  Cost of feedstock became a bit of a problem and the project died  ::-).  IIRC, Quorn used all the same fermentation tech (possibly the same bio-reactors) with a different organism and feedstock.

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Re: Quorn
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2008, 08:24:37 pm »
We eat quite a bit of Quorn as my wife will only eat chicken and Quorn. I think their best product is the Swedish Style "Meat" Balls.

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Quorn
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2008, 11:09:45 am »
Quorn is the spawn of Stan.  Revolting stuff  :sick:
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

Pete

Re: Quorn
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2008, 01:19:49 pm »
As well as all the fictional examples ("soylent green", "NU-food"*) there have been several real-life attempts at food synthesis.  This is nothing new.  I remember reading something about "Chlorella", attempts to create a new wonder-food based on algae, in the 1940s and 1950s.  Not sure if this is connected with Pruteen.  Apparently it never caught on... ;D

The difference with Quorn is that, for for all the carping and occasional allergic problems, it is successful.  Most people who try it, eat it with no problems and enjoy it.  If it weren't for that, the major supermarkets would stop stocking it.  Most of the anti-Quorn campaigning stems from this organisation which is an American meat-industry-sponsored lobby group...

*as developed at Grimbledon Down.  For years I have lamented the closure of that excellent establishment.

Clandy

Re: Quorn
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2011, 08:21:07 pm »
First, sorry for the zombie thread!

Second, I was thinking about trying Quorn mince, for the first time, in a chilli next week, but thought I'd get opinion here first (hence the forum search). Now I'm thinking I'll find some soya mince instead.

Re: Quorn
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2011, 08:31:39 pm »
Well, I like quorn, even now I'm not veggie any more: low fat, high protein, and makes better mince (in my opinion) than soy mince.

But then it doesn't make me sick! I don't know - loads of peopel eat it and like it, hence the fact it's in every supermarket.

Julian

  • samoture
Re: Quorn
« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2011, 08:34:46 pm »
I'm quite keen on Quorn mince in chilli / bolognaise / lasagne - it has a more 'real' texture than soy mince which can get rather soggy. 

Clandy

Re: Quorn
« Reply #37 on: February 06, 2011, 08:37:28 pm »
The reason I will now avoid Quorn is I have had C-diff, twice. Anything that has the potential to make me ill like that again, I'm going to avoid like the plague!

Re: Quorn
« Reply #38 on: February 06, 2011, 08:41:07 pm »
I ate quorn before I was veggie, and continue to now (not veggie for animal welfare reasons). It's very convenient, albeit I am just as happy with sosmix, TVP, etc. However, it's not cheap, so we mostly eat lentils and beans with our veg.

Julian

  • samoture
Re: Quorn
« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2011, 08:47:37 pm »
The reason I will now avoid Quorn is I have had C-diff, twice. Anything that has the potential to make me ill like that again, I'm going to avoid like the plague!

Understandable!

I'd probably use lentils rather than soy mince though.  I find soy mince claggy.  Although I can't guarantee the state of anybody's insides if they make a chilli with lentils and kidney beans.  ;D

Clandy

Re: Quorn
« Reply #40 on: February 06, 2011, 08:50:24 pm »
I'm not going veggie, I just wanted to try Quorn to see what it's like. I will get some soya mince instead. I remember it was used in some of our school dinners and was quite nice.

border-rider

Re: Quorn
« Reply #41 on: February 06, 2011, 08:52:59 pm »
I prefer Quorn.  We eat quite a lot of it - once or twice a week, typically -  and never had C. Diff or anything like that

Clandy

Re: Quorn
« Reply #42 on: February 06, 2011, 08:54:50 pm »
and never had C. Diff or anything like that

Hope you never do. In eight days I lost two stones in weight. When I was admitted to hospital my blood pressure was 80/40, and my kidneys had shut down through dehydration.

Re: Quorn
« Reply #43 on: February 06, 2011, 08:59:48 pm »
and never had C. Diff or anything like that

Hope you never do. In eight days I lost two stones in weight. When I was admitted to hospital my blood pressure was 80/40, and my kidneys had shut down through dehydration.

And you're sure it was due to the Quorn? I mean, perhaps so, but food poisoning can come from all sorts of places.

(EDit - sorry, I think I misunderstood.. It wasn't Quorn that made you sick...)

(Edit, edit... sorry, I'll shut up :-) But I don't think you need be more nervous of Quorn than anything else, then - gazillions of people eat it without problems!)

Re: Quorn
« Reply #44 on: February 08, 2011, 12:00:39 am »
I'm not vegetarian, but am a bit parital to the meat-free products [which I think had improved a lot over the years]. Made a smoked spanish paprika chilli thing the other day with beans and Sainsbury's own brand mince.
It's been a while, but I thought the mince was pretty good. Will definitely use again.
Garry Broad

Martin

Re: Quorn
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2011, 12:07:07 am »
what I like about Quorn is that it enables me to continue enjoy some foods I used to eat, I would not use it for original vegetarian recipes though

eg chilli, sausage / bacon doorstep sandwiches,  toad in the hole with onion gravy, sausage casserole, fajitas etc. In all of these the "meat" is a minor part of the meal

Re: Quorn
« Reply #46 on: February 08, 2011, 05:04:58 pm »
I cooked with Quorn regularly throughout my teenage years due to a vegitarian younger sister. We never had a problem with it, making chillies, pasta dishes etc. or with the 'fillets' or kiev equivilents.

We still have to do one of the roasting joints at christmas for her.

vorsprung

  • Opposites Attract
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Re: Quorn
« Reply #47 on: February 09, 2011, 11:58:20 am »
The wikipedia entry says that the patent on mycoprotein has recently expired

I don't eat Quorn after reading about how it is made.  It is highly processed and I am dubious about stuff like that.  It is kinda the opposite to organic food.

It is odd that vegetarians who are normally so fussy about the quality of what they eat don't mind guzzling this chemical waste
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Clandy

Re: Quorn
« Reply #48 on: February 09, 2011, 12:23:52 pm »
The wikipedia entry says that the patent on mycoprotein has recently expired

I don't eat Quorn after reading about how it is made.  It is highly processed and I am dubious about stuff like that.  It is kinda the opposite to organic food.

It is odd that vegetarians who are normally so fussy about the quality of what they eat don't mind guzzling this chemical waste

I've been doing some research too… and I've decided against eating the stuff. <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8Sp-VFBbjpE&rel=1" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/v/8Sp-VFBbjpE&rel=1</a>...

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Quorn
« Reply #49 on: February 09, 2011, 12:29:58 pm »
I quite like Quorn - much nicer than TVP/soya mince.

I use the Quorn mince in all sorts of things and if I'm making chilli or bolognaise, then I chuck in one of the Knorr Beef Stock Pots and it then taste just like beef.
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor