Author Topic: Wearing a watch  (Read 58133 times)

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #500 on: October 17, 2018, 04:46:25 pm »
Barakta uses a Garmin fitness watch to feel Android notifications (seeing as women's clothes don't have pockets and she can't usefully hear ringtones).  Nearly all of them are far too big for her left wrist.

Kim the new FitBit Charge 3 does Android notifications and isnt massive, plus its cheap (compared to an Apple watch) at about £130. Mrs Pcolbeck has tiny wrists and wears a FitBit Charge 2 and that looks fine.

Her Vivosmart whatever it is is a similar size (possibly slightly narrower).  It's not quite small enough for the diameter of her left wrist (there's a gap where the body of the unit is too long to conform properly), but it's close enough for government work.  Being able to know when something happens on her phone when out and about is a game-changer.  As she has titanium pins through her ulna instead of a radius I doubt that anything's going to be better, unless it was designed to fit small children - and those won't have the required features, even if they are available in colours other than camo and PINK.

Good to see that FitBit are now doing notifications properly though.  Last time we looked it was the better Garmins or the full-on smartwatches that could do arbitrary notifications, with FitBit only doing phonecalls and music or something useless.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #501 on: October 17, 2018, 06:31:10 pm »
If you want your watch to be seen, it follows that big is useful. This, alongside the fact that no-one in the microchip age is impressed by the miniaturisation of clockwork (that drove the impossibly small watches of the 1800s), is the reason for the trend. It takes an experienced – not to mention biologically sound – eye to identify what someone is wearing at a few paces. Extend that by 40% and the catchment area of your status symbol doubles.

I can't fault your logic, but my thinking is that this is purely a fashion thing. Despite knowing way less than the next bloke my (advanced) age about fashion, I'm prepared to wager that big watches won't be The Thing in 20 years time.
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #502 on: October 17, 2018, 06:50:52 pm »
If you want your watch to be seen, it follows that big is useful. This, alongside the fact that no-one in the microchip age is impressed by the miniaturisation of clockwork (that drove the impossibly small watches of the 1800s), is the reason for the trend. It takes an experienced – not to mention biologically sound – eye to identify what someone is wearing at a few paces. Extend that by 40% and the catchment area of your status symbol doubles.

I can't fault your logic, but my thinking is that this is purely a fashion thing. Despite knowing way less than the next bloke my (advanced) age about fashion, I'm prepared to wager that big watches won't be The Thing in 20 years time.

TBH, it's not The Thing now - A couple of years ago your footballists and mumble rappers and what not were walking around with dinner plate sized watches, like ridiculously huge, but they're much more conservative now. I.e. Lil Yachtys $100,000 Patek - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwuHHhX10Ec

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #503 on: October 17, 2018, 08:23:30 pm »
We actually saw the opposite with phones. Pre-smartphone mobiles got smaller and smaller as a sign of blingness, until they started sending emails and youtubing and stuff, when we needed bigger screens – so in that case it was small for bling, large for function. Now it's all large and, yes, combines bling and function. If we start watching movies on our watches, they'll end up as big as, well, current phones – probably. But otherwise, I reckon MattC is right and in the swing of fashion they'll get smaller again. And then bigger and then...
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #504 on: October 17, 2018, 08:35:22 pm »

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #505 on: October 17, 2018, 08:36:32 pm »
So the size of watches could be linked to the availability of wrist porn? Oh, hang on...
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #506 on: October 18, 2018, 06:34:59 am »
Would work well for automatic watches

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #507 on: October 18, 2018, 07:41:02 am »
Having spent yesterday staring at wrists, I have deduced the following.

1. Watch size for men tends to correlate with age and apparent financial status (accounting for wishful thinking)
2. Most men wear middling watches. Very few 'smart watches.'
3. Women don't like middling sized watches – it's either very small bracelet watches or oversized ones. Surprisingly, far more women in 'smart' watches – Apple or Fitbity things.

I'm in Paris though, and things might be different here.

I will test my deductions in London. If I don't get arrested first.
!nataS pihsroW

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #508 on: October 21, 2018, 02:51:39 pm »
It seems that there are a lot of "le Locle" style watches about which bear the legend "AUTOMATIC" whereas mine says "POWERMATIC 80". I googled the difference and found a rather interesting piece about watch movements, accuracy and shock resistance. Apparently "Powermatic 80" has only become available since 2012. The claim is that the watch, although automatic, will carry on working for 80 hours without being worn. Apparently Tissot achieved this by means of reducing the number of oscillations of the balance wheel from 4 to 3 per second, so that the single spring can last longer than normal. It wasn't immediately apparent to me why other watches with a lower hertz rating could not also do this, but it seems that it's the first time this has been achieved within this price range.

My watch seems to be losing about 3 seconds a day, which is perfectly acceptable given that it will need a manual adjustment at least 7 times a year - once for every month of less than 31 days, and again for the annual time changes in March and October.

https://quillandpad.com/2016/09/03/measuring-time-seconds-truth-behind-high-frequency-movements/
Homo sapiens - a creature so intelligent it knowingly sowed the seeds of its own destruction and did nothing about it.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #509 on: October 27, 2018, 12:58:12 pm »
Years ago I bought a cheap black plastic Casio watch (would be about £10 now), the strap broke fairly quickly and I haven't worn a watch since then until about a year ago when I bought about 10 analogue quartz watches from Ebay for about £1 to £3 each. All of them work and keep good time.

When the first one stopped working, I put that aside and got the next one out and wore that. After I got to the fifth one, I bought some new batteries and all the ones that stopped working are now working after a change of batteries.

On the other hand the cheap Casio copies I got from Ebay were crap.

I know someone on min wage and works 12 hours 6 days a week who got a Tissot watch for about £300, it stopped working, took it back to the shop, stopped working again, couldn't find the receipt, and AFAIK it's still not working.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/oct/19/luxury-watch-industry-survive-digital-age

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jan/26/swiss-watch-sales-fall-10-per-cent-china-corruption-crackdown

Samuel D

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #510 on: October 27, 2018, 01:12:41 pm »
I'm in Paris though, and things might be different here.

I will test my deductions in London. If I don't get arrested first.

You’ve left us on tenterhooks. What is the fashion in London?

By the way, I have a standing offer to anyone to join me for a few laps of Longchamp (on a bicycle, not a horse) if they’re visiting Paris and have some time to kill.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #511 on: October 27, 2018, 10:01:13 pm »
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/oct/19/luxury-watch-industry-survive-digital-age
Quote
As one of Tom Stoppard’s characters put it in his 1982 play The Real Thing, “It looked all over for the 15-jewel movement. Men ran through the marketplace shouting ‘the cog is dead!’”
The cog is dead, long live the sprocket!
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #512 on: October 27, 2018, 10:56:39 pm »
I also like that the watch Jose Mourinho was given was called the Special One!
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #513 on: October 28, 2018, 07:05:31 am »
I wonder, does anyone else here recognise The Omega Incabloc Oyster Accutron 72? (without Google, that is)

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #514 on: October 28, 2018, 08:58:33 am »
It's the only wristwatch for a drummer.

Clive James lyric for Pete Atkin.

Blodwyn Pig

  • what a nice chap
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #515 on: October 28, 2018, 03:37:24 pm »
IMG_0320 by mark tilley, on Flickr

watch #1 CWC 'L'


IMG_0322 by mark tilley, on Flickr

watch #2, Pulsar kinetic, (special'Guardian readers offer watch, ..........its never wrong, and it has 2 LEFT hands). Now 18 years old, and extreemly battered, but keeps perfect time.Still available, now £70ish

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #516 on: October 28, 2018, 05:32:42 pm »
I had the mechanical version of this model. It looked too small on my wrist, so I eventually sold it.
I like the simplicity of the dial.


Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #517 on: October 28, 2018, 09:35:06 pm »
It's the only wristwatch for a drummer.

Clive James lyric for Pete Atkin.

I suspected I wouldn't be quite alone here. I sometime wonder what would have happened if I discovered him only recently, I suspect it wouldn't have as much impact as it did finding him in my 20s

For those that are in blissful ignorance, I give you a few lines of a verse that often runs through my head when I'm on a bike

Quote
Perfect Moments
Perfect moments have a clean design
Scoring edges that arrest the flow
Skis cut diamonds in the plump of snow
Times my life feels like a friend of mine

Perfect moments wear a single face
Variations on each other's theme
Renoir's mistresses in peach and cream
Rembrandt's mother in a ruff of lace

Perfect moments bear a single name
They're placed together though they never meet
Charlie Chaplin policing Easy Street
Charlie Parker playing My Old Flame

Perfect moments should redeem the day
Their teeming richness ought to be enough
To take the sting out of the other stuff
A perfect bitch it doesn't work that way



(Clive James/Pete Atkin

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #518 on: October 28, 2018, 09:49:43 pm »


That's my Tissot.

I've decided that it's too expensive to risk a nasty crash on the bike, so I've also bought a cheap Casio F-91W for £5.99 off Ebay. That should arrive tomorrow or Tuesday.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112668886151
Homo sapiens - a creature so intelligent it knowingly sowed the seeds of its own destruction and did nothing about it.

Mr Larrington

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Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #519 on: October 29, 2018, 12:46:29 pm »
Prodded the buttons to make my G-Shock go back an hour.  The digital bit did as it was told, but no amount of button-jibbling has yet persuaded the hands to point to the correct time.  I have had to set the digital side ten minutes slow, so now it goes "beep" at ten past the hour.
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Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #520 on: November 03, 2018, 02:32:16 pm »
A few of my Ebay specials:



£1-3 each. All quartz.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Homo sapiens - a creature so intelligent it knowingly sowed the seeds of its own destruction and did nothing about it.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #522 on: November 11, 2018, 12:09:59 am »
So it didn’t go to the moon.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #523 on: Today at 09:42:36 am »
So it didn’t go to the moon.

Nope. NASA famously used Omega Speedmasters from the Gemini days through to the Space-shuttle. You can still buy them new from Omega today. A really nice watch and functional not flashy like that Rolex.

I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Wearing a watch
« Reply #524 on: Today at 10:19:49 am »
these were NASA issue whereas the Rolex is a personal watch. he would have bought it back in the day prob overseas when on deployment. these luxury watches were a lot cheaper back in the 60s as there wasn't the same cachet on branding. Rolex Submariners were standard issue to RN divers for a while and in the US Navy, Tudor or Rolex were issued or were available from the P/X